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The Other Voice

In Early Modern Europe

 Co-Editors: Margaret King (marglking@gmail.com) and Albert Rabil, Jr. (arabil@nc.rr.com)
Co-Editor, English Texts: Elizabeth H. Hageman (ehageman@cisunix.unh.edu)

 Series Bibliography

A Comprehensive English-Language bibliography related to Women in Early Modern Europe

Opening Statement       Primary Sources     Secondary Studies: Books

Secondary Studies: Edited Books     Secondary Studies: Journal Articles  PDF Files

12/18/2012  (to be periodically updated)

 

 

This bibliography attempts to keep current with scholarly publications in English by and about early modern women (ca. 1400–1700) throughout Europe and other areas where relevant. The date may be expanded forward for some traditions (German, Russian) for which the early modern period is later than for England, France, Italy, and Spain.

The bibliography has several divisions. Primary sources are all listed in one bibliography. But secondary sources have been divided into three bibliographies. One lists single (or double) authored books on one or more writers (or period or area of interest). A second lists edited books (alphabetically by title) together with their tables of contents. A third lists stand-alone articles published in journals, or, in some cases, books in which only one or two essays are relevant. The following journals have been systematically scanned for the years stated (back from 2009 or 2010):

Colonial Latin American Historical Review 11 yrs
Colonial Latin American Review 16 yrs
Early Modern Literary Studies 15 yrs
Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal 4 yrs
English Literary Renaissance 11 yrs
Fifteenth-Century Studies 4 yrs,
Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 14 yrs
Journal of Women’s History 21 yrs
Letras femeninas 21 yrs
Magistra 14 yrs
Renaissance and Reformation 6 yrs
Renaissance Quarterly 40 yrs
Seventeenth Century 9 yrs
Sixteenth Century Journal 30 yrs
Studia Mystica 23 yrs

Coverage outside these journals is sporadic, and we encourage additions from colleagues both of other journals that should be scanned and occasional relevant essays that have thus far escaped our attention.

Lists within three of the four sections of the bibliography are alphabetical by author. In the case of authors whose names include “de” or variants, practice varies. The following conventions are used here. Marguerite de Navarre (a queen) will be listed under Marguerite, just as her brother, a king, is listed as Francis I, and Elizabeth Tudor as Elizabeth I. When any one of the prefixes (de, des, von, etc.) is capitalized, the listing will be with the prefix. Thus “Des Roches, Madeleine and Catherine” will be listed under “d”. When the prefix is not capitalized, the listing will be under the name following the prefix.

On early modern English women a much more exhaustive bibliography covering the period 1500-1640, compiled by Betty S. Travitsky, is available by subscription at www.itergateway.org.

On women and health, Monica Green’s bibliography of books and articles in a number of languages on mostly medieval women also includes entries that extend into early modern Europe. See http://www.sciencia.cat/english/libraryenglish/publicationssc.htm.

Extensive bibliographies on works by and about early modern Italian women can be found at http://home.infionline.net/~ddisse/index.html and the Italian Women Writers Project at the University of Chicago http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/efts/IWW/.

The following websites are also related to ours: the SIEFAR website: www.siefar.org and the Journal of Seventeenth Century Studies out of Scotland: www.maney.co.uk/index.php/journals/sfs/

Attention should also be called to the existence of an annual journal dedicated exclusively to early modern women: Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal. Thus far 4 issues have appeared, 2006–2009. The journal contains articles, a forum, and book reviews, with special attention to websites, exhibitions, and publications in selected fields.

This bibliography, like the series editors’ introduction, is included on this website in several pdf files (one for each section), so that anyone who wishes may print them out. The files are of course searchable, which should increase the usefulness of the list of essays in edited volumes. The bibliography will be regularly updated.

Primary Sources

Agnesi, Maria Gaetana, Giuseppa Eleonora Barbapiccola, Diamante Medaglia Faini, Aretafila Savini de’ Rossi, and the Accademia de’ Ricovrati. The Contest for Knowledge. Ed. and trans. Rebecca Messbarger and Paula Findlen, introd. Rebecca Messbarger. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005.

Agrippa, Henricus Cornelius. Declamation on the Nobility and Preeminence of the Female Sex. Ed. and trans. Albert Rabil, Jr.  The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996.

Alberti, Leon Battista. The Family in Renaissance Florence. Trans. Renée Neu Watkins. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1969.

Ana de San Agustín. The Visionary Life of Madre Ana de San Augustín. Ed. Elizabeth Teresa Howe. Rochester, NY: Tamesis, 2004.

Andreini, Giovan Battista. Love in the Mirror. Ed. and trans. Jon R. Snyder. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe: Toronto Series, 2. Toronto: Iter/CRRS, 2009.

Andreini, Isabella. La Mirtilla: A Pastoral. Trans. Julie Campbell. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2002.

———. Selected Poems of Isabella Andreini. Ed. Anne McNeil, trans. James Wyatt Cook. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, 2005.

Ana de San Bartolomé. Autobiography and Other Writings.. Ed. and trans. Darcy Donahue. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008.

Anne of France. Lessons for my Daughter. Trans. Sharon L. Jansen. Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2004.

Aragona, Tullia d’. Dialogue on the Infinity of Love. Ed. and trans. Rinaldina Russell and Bruce Merry, introd. Rinaldina Russell. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1997.

———. Sweet Fire: Tullia d’Aragona’s Poetry of Dialogue and Selected Prose. Ed. and trans. Elizabeth Pallitto. New York: Braziller, 2006.

Argula von Grumbach: A Woman’s Voice in the Reformation. Ed. and trans. Peter Matheson. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1995.

Askew, Anne. The Examinations of Anne Askew. Ed. Elaine V. Beilin. Women Writers in English, 1350–1850. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996.

Astell, Mary. The First English Feminist: Reflections on Marriage and Other Writings. Ed. and introd. Bridget Hill.  New York: St. Martin's Press, 1986.

——— and John Norris. Letters concerning the Love of God.. Ed. E. Derek Taylor and Melvyn New. The Early Modern Englishwoman 1500–1750: Contemporary Editions. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2005.

Aubespine, Madeleine, de l’. Selected Poems and Translations: A Bilingual Edition. Ed. and trans. Anna Kosowska. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007.

Aughterson, Kate, ed. Renaissance Woman: Constructions of Femininity in England: A Source Book. New York: Routledge, 1995.

Autobiographical Writings by Early Quaker Women. Ed. David Booy. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2004.

Bacon, Lady Anne Cooke. Anne Cooke Bacon. Ed. Valerie Wayne. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2000.

Barbaro, Francesco. On Wifely Duties. Trans. Benjamin Kohl. In The Earthly Republic,, edited by Kohl and R. G. Witt, 179–228. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1978. Translation of the Preface and Book 2.

Battiferra degli Ammannati, Laura. Laura Battiferra and her Literary Circle. Ed. and trans. Victoria Kirkham. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006.

Behn, Aphra. Love Letters between a Nobleman and His Sister. Ed. Janet Todd. New York: Penguin, 1996.

———. Oroonoko. Ed. Joanna Lipking. Norton Critical Edition. New York: W. W. Norton, 1997.

———. The Rover.  Ed. Anne Russell. Peterborough, ON: Broadview Press, 1994; 2nd ed, 1999.

———. The Rover, The Feigned Courtesans, The Lucky Chance, and The Emperor of the Moon. Ed. and introd. Jane Spencer. The World’s Classics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995.

———.  The Works of Aphra Behn.  7 vols.  Ed. Janet Todd.  Columbus: The Ohio State University Press, 1992–96.

Bigolina, Giulia. Urania: A Romance. Ed. and trans. Valeria Finucci. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005.

———. Urania, the story of a young woman’s love; & the Novella of Giulia Camposanpiero and Tesibaldo Vitaliani. Ed. and trans. Christopher Nissen. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2004.

Boccaccio, Giovanni. Corbaccio or the Labyrinth of Love. Trans. Anthony K. Cassell. 2nd rev. ed.  Binghamton, NY: MRTS, 1993.

———. Decameron. Trans. G. H. William. Baltimore: Penguin Books, 1972. Also trans. Mark Musa and Peter Bondanella. (21 novelle with contemporary reactions and modern criticism) New York: W. W. Norton, 1977; and trans. Mark Musa and Peter Bondanella. New York: Penguin Books, 1982.

———. Famous Women. Ed. and trans. Virginia Brown. The I Tatti Renaissance Library. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2001.

Bradstreet, Anne. The Tenth Muse (1650) and, from the Manuscripts, Meditations Divine and Morall, Together with Letters and Occasional Prose. Comp. and introd. Josephine K. Piercy. Delmar, NY: Scholars’ Facsimiles and Reprints, 1978.

———. The Works of Anne Bradstreet.. Ed. Jeannine Hensley, foreword Adrienne Rich. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1967.

Bruni, Leonardo. “On the Study of Literature to Lady Battista Malatesta of Moltefeltro.” In The Humanism of Leonardo Bruni: Selected Texts. Trans. and introd. Gordon Griffiths, James Hankins, and David Thompson, 240–51. Binghamton, NY: MRTS, 1987.

The Burdens of Sister Margaret: Inside a 17th-Century Convent.. Abridged ed., Trans. Craig Harline. New Haven: Yale University Press 2000.

Caminer Turra, Elisabetta. Selected Writings of an Eighteenth-Century Venetian Woman of Letters. Ed. and trans. Catherine M. Sama. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003.

Campbell, Anne. Anne Campbell.. Ed. Sister Theresa Lamy. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2006.

Campiglia, Maddalena. Flori: A Pastoral Drama. A Bilingual Edition. Ed., introd., and notes Virginia Cox and Lisa Sampson, trans. Virginia Cox. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004.

Carleton, Mary. Mary Carleton. Ed. Mihoko Suzuki. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2006.

Cary, Elizabeth, Lady Falkland. The Life and Letters. Ed. Heather Wolfe. Renaissance Texts from Manuscript. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2001.

———. The Tragedy of Mariam, 1613. Ed. A. C. Dunstan. Supplement to the introduction Marta Straznicki and Richard Roland. Malone Society Reprints. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992.

———. The Tragedy of Mariam: The Fair Queen of Jewry. Ed. Stephanie Hodgson-Wright. Peterborough, ON: Broadview Literary Texts, 2000.

———. The Tragedy of Mariam: The Fair Queen of Jewry. With The Lady Falkland: Her Life, by One of Her Daughters.. Ed. Barry Weller and Margaret W. Ferguson. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994.

Castiglione, Baldassare. The Book of the Courtier. Trans. George Bull. New York: Penguin, 1967

———. The Book of the Courtier. Ed. Daniel Javitch. New York: W. W. Norton, 2002.

Cavendish, Margaret, Duchess of Newcastle. Bell in Campo and the Sociable Companions. Ed. Alexandra G. Bennett. Peterborough, ON: Broadview Press, 2002.

———. The Blazing World and Other Writings. Ed. Kate Lilley. London: Pickering and Chatto, 1992; repr. London: Penguin, 1994.

———.The Convent of Pleasure and Other Plays.. Ed. Anne Shaver. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999.

———. Observations upon Experimental Philosophy.. Ed. Eileen O’Neill. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001.

———. Paper Bodies: A Margaret Cavendish Reader.. Ed. Sylvia Bowerbank and Sara Mendelson. Peterborough, ON: Broadview, 1999.

———. Poems and Fancies, 1653.. Menston, UK: Scolar Press, 1972.

———. Political Writings.. Ed. Susan James. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2003.

———. Sociable Letters, 1964.. Scolar Press Facsimile. Menston, UK: Scolar Press, 1969.

Cellier, Elizabeth. Elizabeth Cellier. Ed. Mihoko Suzuki. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2006.

Cereta, Laura. Collected Letters of a Renaissance Feminist. Ed. and trans. Diana Robin. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1997.

Chartier, Alain. The Quarrel of the Bel Dame sans Merci. Ed. and trans. Joan McRae. New York: Routledge, 2004.

The Chronicle of Queen Jane and Queen Mary. Ed. J. G. Nichols. New York: AMS Press, 1968.

Clifford, Lady Anne. The Diaries of Lady Anne Clifford. Ed. D. J. H. Clifford. Phoenix Mill,   UK: Alan Sutton, 1990.

———. Memoir of 1603 and the Diary of 1616–1619. Ed. Katherine O. Acheson. Peterborough, ON: Broadview, 2007.

Coignard, Gabrielle de. Spiritual Sonnets.. A Bilingual Edition. Ed. and trans. Melanie E. Gregg. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004.

Collins, An. Divine Songs and Meditacions. Ed. Sidney Gottlieb. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 1996.

Colonna, Vittoria and Marguerite de Navarre. A Long and Troubled Pilgrimage: The Correspondence of Marguerite d’Angoulême and Vittoria Colonna, 1540–1545. Ed. Barry Collett. Princeton: Princeton Theological Seminary, 2000.

Colonna, Vittoria. Sonnets for Michelangelo. A Bilingual Edition. Ed. and trans. Abigail Brundin. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005.

———, Lucrezia Marinella and Chiara Matraini. Who is Mary: Three Early Modern Women on the Idea of the Virgin Mary.. Ed. and trans. Susan Haskins. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008.

Convents Confront the Reformation: Catholic and Protestant Nuns in Germany.. Ed. and introd. Merry Wiesner-Hanks, trans. Joan Skocir and Merry Wiesner-Hanks. Women of the Reformation. Milwaukee, WI: Marquette University Press, 1996.

Conway, Anne. The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy. Ed. Allison P. Coudert and Taylor Corse. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Crenne, Helisenne de. The Torments of Love. Trans. Lisa Neal and Steven Rendall. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1990.

———. A Renaissance Woman: Helisenne’s Personal and Invective Letters. Ed. and tr. Marianna M. Mustacchi and Paul J. Archambault. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1986.

“Custome Is an Idiot”: Jacobean Pamphlet Literature on Women. Ed. Susan Gushee O’Malley, afterword Ann Rosalind Jones. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2004.

Daughters, Wives, and Widows: Writings by Men about Women and Marriage in England, 1500–1640. Ed. Joan Larsen Klein. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1992.

Davies, Lady Eleanor. Prophetic Writings of Lady Eleanor Davies. Ed. Esther S. Cope. Women Writers in English, 1350–1850. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.

The Defiant Muse: Dutch and Flemish Feminist Poems from the Middle Ages to the Present.. A bilingual anthology. Ed. Erica Eijsko, Maaike Meijer, Ankie Peypers, and Johanna H. Prims. New York: Feminist Press at CUNY, 1998.

The Defiant Muse: German Feminist Poems from the Middle Ages to the Present.. A bilingual anthology. Ed. Susan L. Cocalis. New York: Feminist Press at CUNY, 1986.

The Defiant Muse: Hispanic Feminist Poems from the Middle Ages to the Present.. A bilingual anthology. Ed. Angel Flores and Kate Flores. New York: Feminist Press at CUNY, 1993.

The Defiant Muse: Italian Feminist Poems from the Middle Ages to the Present.. A bilingual edition. Ed. Beverly Allen, Keala Jane Jewell, and Muriel Kittel. New York: Feminist Press at CUNY, 1993.

Dentière, Marie. Epistle to Marguerite de Navarre and Preface to a Sermon by John Calvin. Ed. and trans. Mary B. McKinley. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004.

Dominican Penitent Women. Ed. Maiju Lehmijocki-Gardner. Mahwah, NJ: Paulist Press, 2005.

Du Châtelet, Emilie. Selected Philosophical and Scientific Writings. Ed. and introd. Judith P. Zinsser, trans. Isabelle Bour and Judith P. Zinsser. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009.

DuGard, Lydia. The Letters of Lydia DuGard, 1665–1672: With a New Edition of The Marriages of Cousin Germans by Samuel DuGard. Ed. Nancy Taylor. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies  and Renaissance English Text Society, 2003.

The Early Modern Englishwoman: A Facsimile Library of Essential Works: Printed Writings, 1500-1640: Katherine Parr.. Ed. Betty Travitsky, Patrick Cullen, and Janel Mueller. London: Scholars Press, 1996.

Early Modern Women Poets, 1520-1700: An Anthology.. Ed. Jane Stevenson and Peter Davidson. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001.

Early Modern Women’s Manuscript Poetry.. Ed. Jill Seal Millman and Gillian Wright. Introd. Elizabeth Clarke and Jonathon Gibson. Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press, 2005.

Eighteenth-Century Women: An Anthology. Ed. Bridget Hill. London: George Allen and Unwin, 1984.

Elisabeth of Bohemia, Princess and René Descartes. The Correspondence between Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia and René Descartes.. Ed. and trans. Lisa Shapiro. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007.

Elizabeth I and Her Age: Authoritative Texts, Commentary, and Criticism.. Ed. Donald V. Stump and Sarah M. Felch. New York: W. W. Norton, 2009

Elizabeth I: Autograph Compositions and Foreign Language Originals. Ed. Janel Mueller and Leah S. Marcus. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003.

Elizabeth I: Collected Works.. Ed. Leah S. Marcus, Janel Mueller, and Mary Beth Rose. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000.

Elizabeth’s Glass: With “The Glass of the Sinful Soul” (1544) by Elizabeth I and “Epistle Dedicatory” & “Conclusion” (1548) by John Bale.. Ed. Marc Shell. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1993.

The Letters of Queen Elizabeth I: Ed. G. B. Harrison. New York: Funk and Wagnalls, 1935.

Queen Elizabeth I: Selected Works. Ed. Steven W. May. New York: Washington Square Press, 2004.

Elyot, Thomas. Defence of Good Women: The Feminist Controversy of the RenaissanceFacsimile Reproductions. Ed. Diane Bornstein. New York: Delmar, 1980.

Enchanted Eloquence: Fairy Tales by Seventeenth-Century Women Writers. Ed. and trans. Lewis C. Seifert and Domna C. Stanton. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe . The Toronto Series, 9. Toronto: Iter/CRRS, 2010.

English Women’s Voices, 1540–1700. Ed. Charlotte Otten. Miami: Florida International University Press, 1992.

Erasmus of Rotterdam. Erasmus on Women. Ed. Erika Rummel. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996.

Erauso, Catalina de. Lieutenant Nun: Memoir of a Basque Transvestite in the New World.  Trans. Michele Stepto and Gabriel Stepto. Foreword Marjorie Garber. Boston: Beacon Press, 1995.

Evelinge, Elizabeth. Elizabeth Evelinge, III. Ed. Claire Walker. The Early Modern Englishwoman: A Facsimile Library of Essential Works. Series I, Printed Writings 1500–1640, pt. 4, vol. 1. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2006.

Family Life in Early Modern England: An Anthology of Contemporary Accounts, 1576-1716. Ed. Ralph Houlbrooke. London: Blackwells, 1988.

Fedele, Cassandra. Letters and Orations. Ed. and trans. Diana Robin. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000.

Female and Male Voices in Early Modern England: An Anthology of Renaissance Writing. Ed. Betty S. Travitsky and Anne Lake Prescott. New York: Columbia University Press, 2000.

Female Playwrights of the Restoration: Five Comedies. Ed. Paddy Lyons and Fidelis Morgan. London: Everyman, 1994.

The Female Spectator: English Women Writers before 1800. Ed. Mary R. Mahl and Helene Koon. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1977 and Old Westbury, NY: Feminist Press, 1977.

Ferrazzi, Cecilia. Autobiography of an Aspiring Saint. Ed. and trans. Anne Jacobson Schutte.  The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996.

Fettiplace, Elinor. Elinor Fettiplace’s Receipt Book: Elizabethan Country House Cooking. Ed. Hilary Spurling. London: Elisabeth Sifton Books, 1986.

The Fifteen Joys of Marriage.. Trans. Elizabeth Abbott. New York: Orion Press, 1959.

First Feminists: British Women Writers, 1578–1799. Ed. Moira Ferguson. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1985.

Fonte, Moderata (Modesta Pozzo). Floridoro: A Chivalric Romance. Ed. and introd. Valeria Finucci, trans. Julia Kisacky, annot. Valeria Finucci and Julia Kisacky. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006.

———. The Worth of Women.. Ed. and trans. Virginia Cox. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1997.

Francisca de los Apóstoles. The Inquisition of Francisca: A Sixteenth-Century Visionary on Trial. Ed. and trans. Gillian T. W. Ahlgren. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005.

Franco, Veronica. Poems and Selected Letters.. Ed. and trans. Ann Rosalind Jones and Margaret F. Rosenthal. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998.

Galilei, Maria Celeste. Sister Maria Celeste’s Letters to Her Father, Galileo. Ed. and trans. Rinaldina Russell. Lincoln, NE and New York: Writers Club Press of Universe.com, 2000

———. To Father: The Letters of Sister Maria Celeste to Galileo, 1623–1633. Trans. Dava Sobel. London: Fourth Estate, 2001.

Glückel of Hameln. The Memoirs of Glückel of Hameln. Trans. Marvin Lowenthal, new introd. Robert Rosen. New York: Schocken Books, 1977.

Gournay, Marie le Jars de. Apology for the Woman Writing and Other Works. Introd. Richard Hillman, ed. and trans. Richard Hillman and Colette Quesnel. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002.

———. Preface to the Essays of Michel de Montaigne by his Adoptive Daughter, Marie le Jars de Gournay. Trans. Richard Hillman and Colette Quesnel. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 1998.

de Graffigny, Françoise. Letters from a Peruvian Woman. Introd. Joan DeJean and Nancy K. Miller, trans. David Hornacher. New York: The Modern Language Association of America, 1993.

Greenbury, Catherine and Mary Percy. Catherine Greenbury and Mary Percy. Ed. Jos Blom and Frans Blom. The Early Modern Englishwoman: A Facsimile Library of Essential Works Series I, Printed Writings 1500–1640, pt. 4, vol. 2. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2006.

Greiffenberg, Catharina Regina von. Meditations on the Incarnation, Passion, and Death of Jesus Christ. Ed. and trans. Lynne Tatlock. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009.

Grimmelshausen, Johann. The Life of Courage: The Notorious Thief, Whore and Vagabond. Trans. Mike Mitchell. Sawtry: Cambs, 2001.

Guasco, Annibal. Discourse to Lady Lavinia His Daughter. Ed. and trans. Peggy Osborn. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003.

Guevara, María de. Warnings to the Kings and Advice on Restoring Spain. A Bilingual Edition. Ed. Nieves Romero-Díaz. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007.

Guillet, Pernette du. Complete Poems: A Bilingual Edition. Ed. with introd. and notes Karen Simroth James, trans. Marta Rijn Finch. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. The Toronto Series 6. Toronto: Iter/CRRS, 2010.

Half Humankind: Contexts and Texts of the Controversy about Women in England, 1540–1640. Ed. Katherine Usher Henderson and Barbara F. McManus. Urbana: Illinois University Press, 1985.

Halkett, Lady Anne. Lady Anne Halkett: Selected Self-Writings. Ed. Suzanne L. Trill. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2007.

Her Immaculate Hand: Selected Works by and about the Women Humanists of Quattrocento Italy. Ed. and trans. Margaret L. King and Albert Rabil, Jr. Binghamton, NY: MRTS, 1983; 2nd rev. paperback ed., 1991.

Her Own Life: Autobiographical Writings by Seventeenth-Century Englishwomen. Ed. Elspeth Graham, Hilary Hinds, Elaine Hobby, and Helen Wilcox, New York: Routledge, 1989.

Herbert, Mary Sidney, Countess of Pembroke. The Collected Works of Mary Sidney Herbert, Countess of Pembroke. Ed., introd., and notes Margaret P. Hannay, Noel J. Kinnamon, and Michael G. Brennan. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.

———. Selected Works. Ed. Margaret P. Hannay, Noel J. Kinnamon, and Michael G. Brennan. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005.

Hoby, Lady Margaret. The Private Life of an Elizabethan Lady: The Diary of Lady Margaret Hoby 1599–1605. Ed. Joanna Moody. Phoenix Mill, UK: Sutton Publishing, 1998.

Humanist Educational Treatises. Ed. and trans. Craig W. Kallendorf. The I Tatti Renaissance Library. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2002.

Hume, Anna. Anna Hume. Ed. Thomas P. Roche, Jr. The Early Modern Englishwoman: A Facsimile Library of Essential Works weries II, Printed Writings 1641–1700, pt. 3, vol. 8. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2006.

In Dialogue with the Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Ed. Julie D. Campbell and Maria Galli Stampino. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. The Toronto Series. Toronto: Iter/CRRS, 2010.

Isabella Whitney, Mary Sidney, and Aemilia Lanyer: Renaissance Women Poets. Ed. Danielle Clarke. New York: Penguin, 2000.

James, Elinor. Elinor James. Ed. Paula McDowell. The Early Modern Englishwoman. A Facsimile Library of Essential Works Series II, Printed Writings 1641–1700, pt. 3, vol. 11. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2005.

Jean de Meun. See The Romance of the Rose.

Joan of Arc, La Pucelle: Selected Sources. Ed. and trans. Craig Taylor. Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press, 2006.

Joining the Conversation: Dialogues by Renaissance Women. Ed. Janet Smarr. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005.

Joscelin, Elizabeth. The Mothers Legacy to Her Unborn Childe. Ed. Jean LeDrew Metcalfe.  Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2000.

Journey of Five Capuchin Nuns. Ed. and trans. Sarah E. Owens. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe: Toronto Series, 1. Toronto: Iter/CRRS, 2009.

Juana Inés de la Cruz. The Answer / La Respuesta: Including a Selection of Poems. Ed. and trans. Electa Arenal and Amanda Powell. New York: Feminist Press of The City University of New York, 1994.

———. Poems, Protest, and a Dream.. Trans. and notes Margaret Sayers Peden, introd. Ilan Stavans. New York: Penguin, 1997.

———. A Sor Juana Anthology. Trans. Alan Trublood, foreword Octavio Paz. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1988.

Julian of Norwich. Revelations of Divine Love.. Trans. Elizabeth Spearing, introd. and notes A. C. Spearing. New York: Penguin, 1998.

Jussie, Jeanne de. The Short Chronicle. Ed. and trans. Carrie F. Klaus. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006.

Kempe, Margery. The Book of Margery Kempe. Ed. and trans. Lynn Staley. A Norton Critical Edition. New York: W. W. Norton, 2001.

———. The Book of Margery Kempe. Trans. B. A. Windeatt. New York: Penguin, 1985.

———. The Book of Margery Kempe. Trans. and introd. John Skinner. New York: Doubleday, 1998.

Knox, John. The Political Writings of John Knox: The First Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous Regiment of Women and Other Selected Works.. Ed. Marvin A. Breslow. Washington, DC: Folger Shakespeare Library, 1985.

Kottanner, Helene. The Memoirs of Helene Kottanner, 1439–1440. Trans. Maya B. Williamson. Library of Medieval Women. Rochester, NY: Boydell and Brewer, 1998.

Krämer, Heinrich, and Jacob Sprenger. Malleus Maleficarum (ca. 1487). Trans. Montague Summers. London: Pushkin Press, 1928; repr. New York: Dover, 1971.

Krichevskaia, Liubov. No Good Without Reward: Selected Writings. Ed. and trans. Briar Baer. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Toronto Series. Toronto: Iter/CRRS, 2010.

Labé, Louise. Complete Poetry and Prose. A Bilingual Edition. Ed. and introd. Deborah Lesko Baker, trans. Annie Finch. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006.

———. Sonnets. Introd. and commentary Peter Sharratt, trans. Graham Dunstan Martin. Edinburgh Bilingual Library. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1972.

Labzina, Anna. Days of a Russian Noblewoman: The Memories of Anna Labzina 1758–1821. Trans. and ed. Gary Marker and Rachel May. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2001.

Lafayette, Marie-Madeleine Pioche de La Vergne, Comtesse de. The Princesse de Clèves. Penguin Classics. New York: Penguin Books, 1992.

———. The Princesse de Clèves, The Princesse de Montpensier, The Comtesse de Tende Trans. Terence Cave. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992.

———. The Princess of Clèves,. Ed. with a revised trans. John D. Lyons.. Norton Critical Edition. New York: W. W. Norton, 1994.

———. Zayde: A Spanish Romance. Ed. and trans. Nicholas D. Paige, The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006.

Lanyer, Aemilia. The Poems of Aemilia Lanyer: Salve Deus Rex Judæorum. Ed. Susanne Woods. Women Writers in English, 1350–1850. New York: Oxford University Press. 1993.

Late-Medieval German Women's Poetry : Secular and Religious Songs. Ed. and trans. Albrecht Classen. Library of Medieval Women. Rochester, NY: D.S. Brewer, 2004.

Lay by Your Needles Ladies, Take the Pen: Writing Women in England, 1500–1700 . Ed. Susanne Trill, Kate Chedgzoy, and Melanie Osborne. New York: Arnold, 1997.

Legal Treatises,, 3 vols. Ed. Lynne Greenberg. The Early Modern Englishwoman: A Facsimile Library of Essential Works Series III, Essential Works for the Study of Early Modern Women, pt. 1, vols. 1–3. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2005.

Leibniz and the Two Sophies: The Philosophical Correspondence Ed. and trans. Lloyd Strickland. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. The Toronto Series 10. Toronto: Iter/CRRS, 2010.

The Letters of Catherine of Siena. Trans. Suzanne Noftke. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2001.

The Letters of Elizabeth, Queen of Bohemia. Ed. L. M. Baker. London: The Bodley Head, 1953.

The Letters of the Ro_mberk Sisters: Noblewomen in Fifteenth-Century Bohemia. Translated from Czech and German with Introduction, Notes and Interpretive Essay. Trans. John M. Klassen with Eva Dole_alovà and Lynn Szabo. Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2001.

Life Stories of Women Artists, 1550-1800: An Anthology.. Ed. Julia K. Dabbs. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2009.

Lock, Anne Vaughan. The Collected Works of Anne Vaughan Lock.. Ed. Susan M. Felch. Renaissance English Text Society. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 1999.

The Lunatic Lover and Other Plays by French Women of the 17th and 18th Centuries.. Ed. Perry Gethner. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 1994.

Luther on Women: A Sourcebook. Ed. Susan C. Karant-Nunn and Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003.

Madres del Verbo. Mothers of the Word: Early Spanish American Women Writers, A Bilingual Anthology. Ed. and trans. Nina M. Scott. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1999.

Maintenon, Madame de. Dialogues and Addresses. Ed. and trans. John J. Conley, S.J. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004.

Major Women Writers of Seventeenth-Century England. Ed. James Fitzmaurice, Josephine A. Roberts, Carol L. Barash, Eugine R. Cunnar, and Nancy A. Gutierrez. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1997.

Mancini, Hortense and Marie. Memoirs. Ed. and trans. Sarah Nelson. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008.

Manley, Delarivier. Delarivier Manley. Ed. Stephanie Hodgson-Wright. The Early Modern Englishwoman. A Facsimile Library of Essential Works Series II, Printed Writings 1641–1700, pt. 3, vol. 12. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2006.

Marguerite de Navarre. The Heptameron. Trans. P. A. Chilton. New York: Viking Penguin, 1984.

———. Les Prison: A French and English Edition. Trans. Claire Lynch Wade. New York: Peter Lang, 1989.

———. The Prisons of Marguerite de Navarre. Trans. Hilda Dale. Reading: Whiteknights, 1989.

———. Selected Writings: A Bilingual Edition.. Ed. and trans. Rouben Cholakian and Mary Skemp. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2008.

María of Santo Domingo, Sor. The Book of Prayer of Sor María of Santo Domingo: A Study and Translation. Ed. and trans. Mary E. Giles. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1990.

Marinella, Lucrezia. Enrico or Byzantium Conquered: A Heroic Poem. Ed. and trans. Maria Galli Stampino. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009.

———. Exhortations to Women and to Others if they Please. Ed. and trans. Laura Benedetti. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. The Toronto Series. Toronto: Iter/CRRS, 2011.

———. The Nobility and Excellence of Women and the Defects and Vices of Men. Ed. and trans. Anne Dunhill, introd. Letizia Panizza. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999.

Markham, Gervase. The English Housewife: Containing the inward and outward virtues which ought to be in a complete woman; as her skill in physic, cookery, banqueting-stuff, distillation, perfumes, wool, hemp, flax, dairies, brewing, baking, and all other things belonging to a household. Ed. Michael R. Best. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1986.

Mary of Agreda. The Divine Life of the Most Holy Virgin. Abr. of The Mystical City of God.  Abr. Fr. Bonaventure Amedeo de Caesarea, M.C.  Trans. from French Abbé Joseph A. Boullan. Rockford, IL: Tan Books, 1997.

Mary, Queen of Scots. Bittersweet Within My Heart: The Collected Poems of Mary, Queen of Scots. Trans. and ed. Robin Bell. London: Pavilion Books, 1992.

Matraini, Chiara. Selected Poetry and Prose. A Bilingual Edition. Ed. and trans. Elaine Maclachlan, introd. Giovanna Rabitti. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007.

McKinley, Mary B. “Agony, Ecstasy, and the Mulekeeper’s Wife: A Reading of Heptaméron 2.” A French Forum: Mélanges de littérature française offerts à Raymond C. Et Virginia A. La Charité. Ed. Gérard Defaux and Jerry Nash. Paris: Klincksieck, 2000. 129–42.

Medici, Lucrezia Tornabuoni de’. Sacred Narratives. Ed. and trans. Jane Tylus. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001.

Meridian Anthology of Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Plays by Women. Ed. Katharine M. Rogers. New York: Penguin, 1994.

Miani, Valeria. Celinda: A Tragedy. Ed. and introd. Valeria Finucci, trans. Julia Kisacky, annot. Valeria Finucci and Julia Kisacky. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. The Toronto Series, 8. Toronto: Iter/CRRS, 2010.

Miscellaneous Short Poetry, 1641–1700. Ed. Robert C. Evans. The Early Modern Englishwoman: A Facsimile Library of Essential Works. Series II, Printed Writings 1641–1700, pt. 3, vol. 4. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2006.

Montpensier, Anne-Marie-Louise d’Orléans, Duchesse de. Against Marriage: The Correspondence of La Grande Mademoiselle. Ed. and trans. Joan DeJean. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002.

Moore, Dorothy. The Letters of Dorothy Moore, 1612–64: The Friendships, Marriage and Intellectual Life of a Seventeenth-Century Woman. Ed. Lynette Hunter. The Early Modern Englishwoman 1500–1750: Contemporary Editions. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2004.

Morata, Olympia. The Complete Writings of an Italian Heretic. Ed. and trans. Holt N. Parker. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003.

Moulsworth, Martha. “My Name Was Martha”: A Renaissance Woman’s Autobiographical Poem. Ed. and commentary Robert C. Evans and Barbara Wiedemann. West Cornwall, CT: Locust Hill Press, 1993.

New Historical Anthology of Music by Women. Ed. James R. Briscoe. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2004.

Niccolini, Sister Giustina. The Chronicle of Le Murate. Ed. and trans. Saundra Weddle. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. The Toronto Series. Toronto: Iter/CRRS, 2010.

Nogarola, Isotta. Complete Writings: Letterbook, Dialogue on Adam and Eve, Orations. Ed. and trans. Margaret L. King and Diana Robin. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004.

Osborne, Dorothy. Letters to Sir William Temple. Ed., introd., and notes Kenneth Parker. New York: Penguin, 1987.

The Paradise of Women: Writings by Englishwomen of the Renaissance. Ed. Betty Travitsky. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1981.

Parr, Katherine. Prayers or Medytacions and The Lamentation of a Synner. Ed. Janel Mueller. The Early Modern Englishwoman: A Facsimile Library of Essential Works.

Part 1: Printed Writings, 1500–1640. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 1996.

Pascal, Jacqueline. A Rule for Children and Other Writings. Ed. and trans. John J. Conley, S.J.  The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003.

Petersen, Johanna Eleonora. The Life of Lady Johanna Eleonora Petersen, Written by Herself. Ed. and trans. Barbara Becker-Cantarino. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005.

Philips, Katherine Fowler. The Collected Works of Katherine Philips: The Matchless Orinda. 3 vols. Edited by Patrick Thomas. Stump Cross, Essex, UK: Stump Cross Books, 1990.

Phoeniz, Anne. Anne Phoenix. Ed. David Como. The Early Modern Englishwoman. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2006.

Pizan, Christine de. The Book of the City of Ladies. Trans. Earl Jeffrey Richards. Foreword Marina Warner. New York: Persea Books, 1982.

———. The Book of the City of Ladies. Trans., introd., and notes Rosalind Brown-Grant. New York: Penguin, 1999.

———. Debate of the “Romance of the Rose”. Ed. and trans. David F. Hult. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010.

———. A Medieval Woman’s Mirror of Honor: The Treasury of the City of Ladies.. Trans. and introd. Charity Cannon Willard.  Ed. and introd. Madeleine P. Cosman.  New York: Persea Books, 1989.

———. Poems of Cupid, God of Love.. Ed. and trans. Thelma S. Fenster and Mary Carpenter Erler. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1990.

———. The Treasure of the City of Ladies. Trans. Sarah Lawson. New York: Viking Penguin, 1985.

Poullain de la Barre, François. Three Cartesian Feminist Treatises. Introd. and notes Marcelle Maistre Welch, trans. Vivien Bosley. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002.

Pulci, Antonia. Saints’ Lives and Bible Stories for the Stage. Ed. and introd. Elissa Weaver, trans. James Wyatt Cook. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe: Toronto Series, 7. Toronto: Iter/CRRS, 2010.

Reading Early Modern Women: An Anthology of Texts in Manuscript and Print, 1550–1700. Ed. Helen Ostovich and Elizabeth Sauer. New York: Routledge, 2004.

Reading Monarch’s Writing: The Poetry of Henry VIII, Mary Stuart, Elizabeth I, and James VI/I. Ed. Peter C. Herman. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2002.

Renaissance Drama by Women: Texts and Documents. Ed. S. P. Cerasano and Marion Wynne-Davies. New York: Routledge, 1996.

Renaissance Woman: Constructions of Femininity in England; A Source Book. Ed. Kate Aughterson. New York: Routledge, 1995.

Rhetorical Theory by Women before 1900: An Anthology.. Ed. Jane Donawerth. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2002.

Riccoboni, Sister Bartolomea. Life and Death in a Venetian Convent: The Chronicle and Necrology of Corpus Domini, 1395–1436. Ed. and trans. Daniel Bornstein. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000.

Des Roches, Madeleine and Catherine. From Mother and Daughter. Ed. and trans. Anne R. Larsen. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006.

The Romance of the Rose. [William de Lorris and Jean de Meun]. Trans. Charles Dahlbert.  Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1971; repr. University Press of New England, 1983.

Russia Through Women’s Eyes: Autobiographies from Tsarist Russia. Ed. Toby W. Clyman and Judith Vowles. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1996.

Russian Women, 1698–1917 Experience & Expression: An Anthology of Sources. Compiled, ed., annot., and introd. Robin Bisha, Jehanne M. Gheith, Christine Holden, and William G. Wagner. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2002.

Sabuco, Oliva de Nantes Barrera. The True Medicine. Ed. and trans. Gianna Pomata. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Toronto Series, 4. Toronto: Iter/CRRS, 2010.

Sainctonge, Gillot de. Dramatizing Dido, Circe, and Griselda. Ed. and trans. Janet L. Smarr. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Toronto Series 5. Toronto: Iter/CRRS, 2010.

Saints, Sinners, and Sisters: Gender and Northern Art in Medieval and Early Modern Europe. Ed. Jane Louise Carroll and Alison G. Stewart. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2003.

Salazar, María de San José. Book for the Hour of Recreation. Introd. and notes Alison Weber, trans. Amanda Powell. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002.

Salter, Thomas. A Critical Edition of Thomas Salter’s The Mirrhor of Modestie. Ed. Janis Butler Holm. The Renaissance Imagination. New York: Garland, 1987.

Sarrocchi, Margherita. Scanderbeide: The Heroic Deeds of George Scanderbeg, King of Epirus. Ed. and trans. Rinaldina Russell. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006.

San José, María de. A Wild Country out in the Garden: The Spiritual Journals of a Colonial Mexican nun. Ed. and trans. Kathleen A. Myers and Amanda Powell. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1999.

Schurman, Anna Maria van. Whether a Christian Woman Should Be Educated and Other Writings from Her Intellectual Circle. Ed. and trans. Joyce L. Irwin. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998.

Schütz Zell, Katharina. Church Mother: The Writings of a Protestant Reformer in Sixteenth-Century Germany. Ed. and trans. Elsie McKee. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006.

Scudéry, Madeleine de. Selected Letters, Orations and Rhetorical Dialogues. Ed. and trans. Jane Donawerth and Julie Strongson. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004.

———. The Story of Sappho. Ed. and trans. Karen Newman. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003.

Sévigné, Madame de. Selected Letters. Introd. and trans. Leonard Tancock. New York: Penguin Books, 1982.

Sidney,Mary. Selected Works of Mary Sidney Herbert, Countess of Pembroke. Ed. Margaret P. Hannay, Noel J. Kinnamon, and Michael G. Brennan. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005.

Sidney, Robert and Barbara Gamage Sidney. Domestic Politics and Family Absence: The Correspondence (1588–1621) of Robert Sidney, First Early of Leicester, and Barbara Gamage Sidney, Countess of Leicester. Ed. Margaret P. Hannay, Noel J. Kinnamon, and Michael G. Brennan. The Early Modern Englishwoman 1500–1750: Contemporary Editions. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2005.

Siegemund, Justine. The Court Midwife. Ed. and trans. Lynne Tatlock. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005.

Sophie, Electress of Hanover (1630-1714). See Leibniz and the Two Sophies.

Sophie Charlotte, Queen of Prussia (1668-1705). See Leibniz and the Two Sophies.

Southwell, Anne. The Southwell-Sibthorpe Commonplace Book, Folger  MS. V.b.198. Ed. Jean Klene, C.S.C. Renaissance English Text Society. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 1997.

Speght, Rachel. The Polemics and Poems of Rachel Speght. Ed. Barbara Kiefer Lewalski. Women Writers in English, 1350–1850. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996.

Stampa, Gaspara. Selected Poems. Ed. and trans. Laura Anna Stortoni and Mary Prentice Lillie. New York: Italica Press, 1994.

Strozzi, Alessandra. Selected Letters: Bilingual Edition. Ed. and trans. Heather Gregory. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997.

Stuart, Lady Arbella. The Letters of Lady Arbella Stuart. Ed. Sara Jayne Steen. Women Writers in English, 1350–1850. New York: Oxford University Press, 1994.

Suchon, Gabrielle. A Woman Who Defends All the Persons of Her Sex: Selected Philosophical and Moral Writings. Ed. and trans. Domna C. Stanton and Rebecca M. Wilkin. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010.

Sulam, Sarra Copia. Jewish Poet and Intellectual in Seventeenth-Century Venice. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Ed. and trans. Don Harran. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009.

Tarabotti, Arcangela. Paternal Tyranny. Ed. and trans. Letizia Panizza. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004.

———. “Women are not Human.” An Anonymous Treatise and Responses. Trans. Teresa M. Kenney. New York: Crossroad Publishing Co., 1998.

Teresa of Avila, Saint. The Collected Works of St. Teresa of Avila.. 3 vols. Trans. Kieran Kavanaugh and Otilio Rodriguez. Washington, DC: Institute of Carmelite Studies, 1976-1980.

———. The Complete Poetry of St. Teresa of Avila: A Bilingual Edition.. New Orleans: University Press of the South, 1996.

———. The Life of Saint Teresa of Avila by Herself.. Trans. J. M. Cohen. New York: Viking Penguin, 1957.

———. The Interior Castle.. Ed. and trans. Allison Peers. New York: Doubleday, 1989.

———. Theresa of Avila: The Book of Her Life.. Trans. Kieran Kavanaugh, O.C.D. and Odilio Rodriguez, O.C.D., Introd. Jodi Bilinkoff. Indianapolis: Hackett, 2008.

———. The Way of Perfection. Ed. and trans. Henry L. Carrigan. Brewster, MA: Paraclete Press, 2000.

The Texts of the Querelle des femmes, 1521-1640. Ed. Pamela Joseph Benson. The Early Modern Englishwoman: A Facsimile Library of Essential Works, 1500-1750, series III. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2006

Three Seventeenth-Century Plays on Women and Performance. Ed. Hero Chalmers, Julie Sanders, and Sophie Tomlinson. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2006. [The Wild-Goose Chase by John Fletcher, The Bird in a Cage by James Shirley, The Convent of Pleasure by Margaret Cavendish]

Thynne, Joan, and Maria Thynne. Two Elizabethan Women: Correspondence of Joan and Maria Thynne, 1575-1611. Ed. Alison D. Wall. Devizes, UK: Wiltshire Record Society, 1983.

Tilney, Edmund. The Flower of Friendship: A Renaissance Dialogue Contesting Marriage. Ed. and introd. Valerie Wayne. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1993.

Trapnel, Anna. The Cry of a Stone. Ed. and introd. Hilary Hinds. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2000.

The Trial of Joan of Arc. Trans. and introd. Daniel Hobbins. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2005.

Trotter, Catherine. Catharine Trotters’ “The Adventures of a Young Lady” and other Works. Ed. Anne Kelley. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2006.

Two Women of the Great Schism. The Revelations of Constance de Rabastens by Raymond de Sabanac and Life of the Blessed Ursulina of Parma by Simone Zanachi. Ed. and trans. Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski and Bruce L. Venarde. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe: Toronto Series, 3. Toronto: Iter/CRRS, 2010.

Untold Sisters: Hispanic Nuns in Their Own Words.  Ed. Electa Arenal and Stacey Schlau, trans. Amanda Powell. Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press, 1989.

Ursula de Jesús. The Souls of Purgatory: The Spiritual Diary of a Seventeenth-Century Afro-Peruvian Mystic, Ursula de Jesús. Ed. and trans. Nancy E. van Deusen. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2004.

Villedieu, Madame de. Memoirs of the Life of Henriette-Sylvie de Molière: A Novel. Ed. and trans. Donna Kuizenga. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004.

Vives, Juan Luis. The Education of a Christian Woman: A Sixteenth-Century Manual. Ed. and trans. Charles Fantazzi. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000.

———. The Instruction of a Christen Woman. Ed. Virginia Walcott Beauchamp, Elizabeth H. Hageman, and Margaret Mikesell. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2002.

Water Lilies, Flores del agua: An Anthology of Spanish Women Writers from the Fifteenth through the Nineteenth Century. Ed. Amy Katz Kaminsky. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1996.

Weamys, Anna. Anna Weamys. Ed. Marea Mitchell. The Early Modern Englishwoman. Printed Writings 1641–1700, pt. 3 vol. 7. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2005.

———. A Continuation of Sir Philip Sidney’s Arcadia. Ed. Patrick Colborn Cullen. New York: Oxford University Press, 1994.

Wirtemberska, Maria. Malvina or The Heart’s Intuition. Trans. Ursula Phillips. London: Polish Cultural Foundation, 2001.

Weston, Elizabeth Jane. Collected Writings. Ed. and trans. Donald Cheney and Brenda M. Hosington. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2000.

Weyer, Johann. Witches, Devils, and Doctors in the Renaissance: Johann Weyer, De praestigiis daemonum. Ed. George Mora with Benjamin G. Kohl, Erik Midelfort, and Helen Bacon, trans. John Shea. Binghamton, NY: MRTS, 1991.

William de Lorris. See The Romance of the Rose..

Witchcraft in England, 1558–1619. Ed. Barbara Rosen. 1969; repr. with a new preface Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1991.

Witchcraft in Europe, 1100–1700: A Documentary History.. Ed. Alan C. Kors and Edward Peters. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1972.

Wollstonecraft, Mary. A Vindication of the Rights of Men and a Vindication of the Rights of Women. Ed. Sylvana Tomaselli. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995.

———. TThe Vindications of the Rights of Men, The Rights of Women. Ed. D. L. Macdonald and Kathleen Scherf.  Peterborough, ON, Canada: Broadview Press, 1997.

Woman Defamed and Woman Defended: An Anthology of Medieval Texts. Ed. Alcuin Blamires. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1992.

The Woman’s Sharp Revenge: Five Women’s Pamphlets from the Renaissance. Ed. Simon Shepherd. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1985.

Women and Murder in Early Modern News Pamphlets and Broadside Ballads, 1573–1697. Ed. Randall Martin. The Early Modern Englishwoman: A Facsimile Library of Essential Works series III, Essential Works for the Study of Early Modern Women, pt. 1, vol. 7. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2005.

Women in Early Modern Germany: An Anthology of Popular Texts. Ed. and trans. Joy Wiltenburg. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 249. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2002.

Women Critics, 1660–1820: An Anthology. Edited by the Folger Collective on Early Women Critics. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1995.

Women Writers of Early Modern Spain. Ed. Barbara Mujica. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2004. [Introduction and notes in English, texts in Spanish only]

Women Writers of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. Katharina M. Wilson. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1987.

Women Writers of the Seventeenth Century. Introd. Katharina M. Wilson, ed. Frank J. Warnke. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1989.

Women Writing Latin from Roman Antiquity to Early Modern Europe. 3 vols. Ed. Laurie J. Churchill, Phyllis R. Brown, and Jane E. Jeffrey. New York: Routledge, 2002.

Women Philosophers of the Early Modern Period. Ed. Margaret Atherton. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing Co., 1994.

Women Poets of the Italian Renaissance: Courtly Ladies and Courtesans. Ed. Laura Anna Stortoni, trans. Stortoni and Mary Prentice Lillie. New York: Italica Press, 1997.

Women Poets of the Renaissance. Ed. Marion Wynne-Davies. New York: Routledge, 1999.

Women Writers of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. Katharina M. Wilson. Althens: University of Georgia Press, 1987.

Women Writers of the Seventeenth Century. Ed. Katharina M. Wilson and Frank J. Warnke. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1989.

Women’s Acts. Plays by Women Dramatists of Spain’s Golden Age. Ed. Teresa S. Soufas. Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1997.

Women’s Life Writing in Early Modern Scotland: Writing the Evangelical Self, c. 1670–c. 1730. Ed. David G. Mullan. The Early Modern Englishwoman, 1500–1750: Contemporary Editions. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2003.

Women’s Worlds in Seventeenth-Century England: A Source Book. Ed. Patricia Crawford and Laura Gowing. New York: Routledge, 2000.

Women’s Writing in Stuart England: The Mother’s Legacies of Dorothy Leigh, Elizabeth Joscelin and Elizabeth Richardson. Ed. Sylvia Brown. Thrupp, Stroud, Gloucester, UK: Sutton, 1999.

Writings by Pre-Revolutionary French Women: From Marie de France to Elizabeth Vigée-Le Brun. Ed. Anne R. Larsen and Colette H. Winn. New York: Garland, 2000.

Wroth, Lady Mary. The First Part of the Countess of Montgomery’s Urania. Ed. Josephine A. Roberts. Renaissance English Text Society. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 1995.

———. The Second Part of the Countess of Montgomery’s Urania. Ed. Josephine R. Roberts, Suzanne Gossett, and Janel Mueller. Renaissance English Text Society. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 1999.

———. Lady Mary Wroth’s “Love’s Victory”: The Penshurst Manuscript. Ed. Michael G. Brennan. London: The Roxburghe Club, 1988.

———. Pamphilia to Amphilanthus. Ed. G. F. Waller. Elizabethan and Renaissance Studies. Salzburg, Austria: Institut für Englische Sprache und Literatur Universität Salzburg, 1977.

———. The Poems of Lady Mary Wroth. Ed. Josephine A. Roberts. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1983.

Zayas y Sotomayor, María de. The Disenchantments of Love.. Trans. H. Patsy Boyer. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1997.

———. The Enchantments of Love: Amorous and Exemplary Novels. Trans. H. Patsy Boyer.  Berkeley: University of California Press, 1990.

———. Exemplary Tales of Love and Tales of Disillusion. Ed. and trans. Margaret R. Greer and Elizabeth Rhodes. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009.

 

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Secondary Studies: Books

Ahlgren, Gillian. Teresa of Avila and the Politics of Sanctity. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1996.

Åkerman, Susanna. Queen Christina of Sweden: The Transformation of a Seventeenth-Century Philosophical Libertine. Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1991.

Allen, Sister Prudence, R.S.M. The Concept of Woman: The Aristotelian Revolution, 750 B.C. – A.D. 1250. Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans, 1997.

———.  The Concept of Woman, vol. 2: The Early Humanist Reformation, 1250–1500.  Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans, 2002.

Amussen, Susan D. An Ordered Society: Gender and Class in Early Modern England. Oxford and New York: Basil Blackwell, 1988.

Anderson, Bonnie S. and Judith P. Zinsser. A History of Their Own. 2 vols. New York: Oxford University Press, rev. ed., 1999.

Anderson, Karen. Chain Her by One Foot: The Subjugation of Women in Seventeenth-Century New France. New York: Routledge, 1991.

Andrea, Bernadette. Women and Islam in Early Modern English Literature. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007.

Andreadis, Harriette. Sappho in Early Modern England: Female Same-Sex Literary Erotics, 1550–1714. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2001.

Archer, Robert. The Problem of Woman in Late-Medieval Hispanic Literature. Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK: Boydell and Brewer (Tamesis), 2005.

Armon, Shifra. Picking Wedlock: Women and the Courtship Novel in Spain. New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2002.

Aronson, Nicole. Mademoiselle de Scudéry. Trans. Stuart R. Aronson. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1978.

Atkinson, Clarissa W. Mystic and Pilgrim: The Book and the World of Margery Kempe. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1983.

Backer, Dorothy Anne Liot. Precious Women. New York: Basic Books, 1974.

Badin, Patricia. The Maudlin Impression: English Literary Images of Mary Magdalene, 1550–1700. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 2009.

Baernstein, P. Renée. A Convent Tale: A Century of Sisterhood in Spanish Milan. New York: Routledge, 2002.

Bainton, Roland H. Women of the Reformation in France and England. Minneapolis, MN: Augsburg, 1973.

———. Women of the Reformation in Germany and Italy. Minneapolis, MN: Augsburg, 1971.

———. Women of the Reformation, from Spain to Scandinavia. Minneapolis, MN: Augsburg, 1977.

Baker, Deborah Lesko. The Subject of Desire: Petrarchan Poetics and the Female Voice in Louise Labé. Foreword by Tom Conley. West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Press, 1996.

Ballaster, Rosalind. Seductive Forms. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992.

Barash, Carol. English Women’s Poetry, 1649–1714: Politics, Community, and Linguistic Authority. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996.

Bardsley, Sandy. Venomous Tongues : Speech and Gender in Late Medieval England. The Middle Ages Series. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006.

Barroll, Leeds. Anna of Denmark: A Cultural Biography. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001.

Barstow, Anne L. Joan of Arc: Heretic, Mystic, Shaman. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press, 1986.

Battigelli, Anna. Margaret Cavendish and the Exiles of the Mind. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1998.

Beasley, Faith. Revising Memory: Women’s Fiction and Memoirs in Seventeenth-Century France. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1990.

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Richardson, Brian. Printing, Writers and Readers in Renaissance Italy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

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Shemek, Deanna. Ladies Errant: Wayward Women and Social Order in Early Modern Italy.  Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1998.

Shenk, Linda. Learned Queen: The Image of Elizabeth I in Politics and Poetry. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.

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Sondergard, Sidney. Sharpening Her Pen: Strategies of Rhetorical Violence by Early Modern Women Writers. Selingsgrove, PA:P Susquehanna University Press, 2002.

Soufas, Teresa Scott.  Dramas of Distinction: A Study of Plays by Golden Age Women.  LLexington: The University Press of Kentucky, 1997.

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Straznicky, Marta. Privacy, Playreading, and Women’s Closet Drama, 1550–1700. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.

Stretton, Timothy. Women Waging Law in Elizabethan England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Strocchia, Sharon. Nuns and Nunneries in Renaissance Florence. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009.

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Summit, Jennifer. Lost Property: The Woman Writer and English Literary History, 1380–1589.  Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000.

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———. Writing Women in Late Medieval and Early Modern Spain: The Mothers of Saint Teresa of Avila. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1995.

Suzuki, Mihoko. Subordinate Subjects: Gender, the Political Nation, and Literary Form in England, 1588–1688. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2003.

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Taylor, Larissa J. The Virgin Warrior: The Life and Death of Joan of Arc. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009.

Teaching Tudor and Stuart Women Writers. Ed. Susanne Woods and Margaret P. Hannay. New York: MLA, 2000.

Teague, Frances. Bathsua Makin, Woman of Learning.  Lewisburg, PA: Bucknell University Press, 1999.

Tetel, Marcel. Marguerite de Navarre’s Heptameron: Themes, Language, and Structure. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1973.

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Thompson, John Lee. John Calvin and the Daughters of Sarah: Women in Regular and Exceptional Roles in the Exegesis of Calvin, His Predecessors, and His Contemporaries. Travaux d’Humanisme et Renaissance 259. Geneva: Librairie Droz, 1992.

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Thysell, Carol. The Pleasure of Discernment: Marguerite de Navarre as Theologian. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.

Tinagli, Paola. Women in Italian Renaissance Art: Gender, Representation, Identity. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1997.

Todd, Janet. The Secret Life of Aphra Behn. London, New York, and Sydney: Pandora, 2000.

———.  The Sign of Angelica: Women, Writing and Fiction, 1660–1800. New York: Columbia University Press, 1989.

Tomas, Natalie R. The Medici Women: Gender and Power in Renaissance Florence. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2004.

Tomlinson, Sophie. Women on Stage in Stuart Drama. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006.

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Translating Desire in Medieval and Early Modern Literature. Ed. Craig Berry and Heather Hayton. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005.

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Vickery, Amanda. The Gentleman’s Daughter: Women’s Lives in Georgian England. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1998.

Virtue, Liberty, and Toleration: Political Ideas of European Women 1400-1700. Ed. Karen S. Broad and Karen Green. Dordrecht: Springer, 2007.

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Vollendorf, Lisa. The Lives of Women: A New History of Inquisitional Spain. Nashville: Vanderbilt University Press, 2005.

———. Reclaiming the Body: María de Zayas's Early Modern Feminism. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2000.

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———. Writing Early Modern History. London: Hodder Arnold, 2005.

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Walker, Julia M. Dissing Elizabeth: Negative Representations of Gloriana. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1998.

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———. Women of the English Renaissance and Reformation. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1983.

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———. Gender, Church, and State in Early Modern Germany: Essays. New York: Longman, 1998.

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———. Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993, 3rd ed., 2008.

———.  Working Women in Renaissance Germany. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1986.

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Woodford, Charlotte. Nuns as Historians in Early Modern Germany. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2002.

Woods, Susanne. Lanyer: A Renaissance Woman Poet. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

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Wunder, Heide. He Is the Sun, She Is the Moon: Women in Early Modern Germany. Trans. Thomas Dunlap. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998.

Yandell, Cathy. Carpe Corpus: Time and Gender in Early Modern France. Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2000.

Zinsser, Judith P. Men, Women, and the Birthing of Modern Science. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2005.

Zorach, Rebecca. Blood, Milk, Ink, Gold: Abundance and Excess in the French Renaissance. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005.

 

Secondary Studies: Edited Books

This is a work in progress- it will be completed soon--please see the complete list on the PDF file below

Aemilia Lanyer: Gender, Genre, and the Canon. Ed. Marshall Grossman. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1998.
    1. David Bevington, “A. L. Rowse’s Dark Lady,” 10-28.
    2. Leeds Barroll, “Looking for Patrons,” 29-48
    3. Barbara K. Lewalski, “Seizing Discourses and Reinventing Genres,” 49-59
    4. Kari Boyd McBride, “Sacred Celebration: The Patronage Poems,” 60-82
    5. Susanne Woods, “Vocation and Authority: Born to Write,” 83-98
    6. Janel Mueller, “The Feminist Poetics of Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum (99-127)
    7. Marshall Grossman, “The Gendering of Genre: Literary History and the Canon,” 128-42
    8. Naomi J. Miller, “(M)other Tongues: Maternity and Subjectivity,” 143-66
    9. Michale Morgan Holmes, “The Love of Other Women: Rich Chains and Sweet Kisses,” 167-90
    10.     Achsah Guibbory, “The Gospel According to Aemilia: Women and the Sacred,” 191-211
    11.  Boyd Berry, “‘Pardon...though I have digrest’: Digression as Style in Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum,” 212-33.
    12. Karen Nelson, “Annotated Bibliography: Texts and Criticism of Aemilia Bassano Lanyer,” 234-54.

Ambiguous Realities: Women in the Middle Ages and Renaissance
. Ed. Carole Levin and Jeanie Watson. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1987.
  Introduction, by Carole Levin, 14–22.
I.  Role and Representation in Medieval and Early Renaissance Texts
    1. Boccaccio’s In-Famous Women: Gender and Civic Virtue in the De mulieribus claris, by Constance Jordan, 25–47.
    2. Zenobia in Medieval and Renaissance Literature, by Valerie Wayne, 48–65.
    3. Heloise: Inquiry and the Sacra Pagina, by Eileen Kearney, 66–81.
    4. The Frivolities of Courtiers Follow the Footprints of Women: Public Women and the Crisis of Virility in John of Salisbury, by Cary J. Lederman and N. Elaine Lawson, 82–96.
II. Rereadings of Medieval and Renaissance Literary Texts
    5. Domestic Treachery in The Clerk’s Tale, by Deborah S. Ellis, 99–113.
    6. Enid the Disobedient: The Mabinogian’s Gereint and Enid, by Jeanie Watson, 114–32
    7. Communication Short-Circuited: Ambiguity and Motivation in the Heptaméron, by Karen F. Wiley, 133–44.
    8.  Reading Spenser’s Faerie Queen—In a Different Voice, by Shirley F. Staton, 145–62.
III. Role and Representation in English Renaissance Texts
    9. Presentations of Women in the English Popular Press, by Sara J. Eaton, 165–83.
    10. The Feme Couvert in Elizabeth Cary’s Mariam, by Betty S. Travitsky, 184–96.
    11. The Myth of a Feminist Humanism: Thomas Salter’s The Mirrhour of Modestie, by Janis Butler Holme, 197–218.
    12. “I Trust I May Not Trust Thee”: Women’s Visions of the World in Shakespeare’s King John, by Carole Levin, 219–34.
    13. Recorder Fleetwood and the Tudor Queenship Controversy, by Dennis Moore, 235–50.

Approaches to Teaching Lafayette’s
The Princess of Clèves. Ed. Faith E. Beasley and Katharine Ann Jensen. New York: Modern Language Association of America, 1998.
  Introduction: La Princesse de Clèves and the History of the French Novel, 1–8.
I. Materials
  A. Editions, French and English, 11–14..
  B. The Instructor’s Library, 15–20.
  C. Aids to Teaching, 21.
II. Approaches
  A.  Introduction: Mirroring Society: La Princesse de Clèves in Context, by Faith E. Beasley and Katharine Ann Jensen, 25–29.
    1. Lafayette’s First Readers: The Quarrel of La Princesse de Clèves, by Elizabeth C. Goldsmith, 30–37.
    2. Jansenist Resonances in La Princesse de Clèves, by Louis MacKenzie, 38–46.
    3. Court Society and Economies of Exchange, by Harriet Stone, 47–53.
    4. Virtue and Civility in La Princesse de Clèves, by Marie-Paule Laden, 54–59.
    5. Masculinity in La Princesse de Clèves, by Lewis C. Seifert, 60–67.
    6. Making Sense of the Ending: Passion, Virtue, and Female Subjectivity, by Katharine Ann Jensen, 68–75.
  B. Themes and Structures
    1. The Mother-Daughter Subtext in La Princesse de Clèves, by Michèle Longino, 76–84.
    2. Conflicting Emotions: Personal and Cultural Vraisemblance in La Princesse de Clèves, by Inge Crosman Wimmers, 85–91.
    3. Getting Inside: Digression, Entanglement, and the Internal Narratives, by Rae Beth Gordon, 92–101.
    4. Mapping La Princesse de Clèves: A Spatial Approach, by Eva Posfay, 102–8.
    5. Seeing and Being Seen: Visual Codes and Metaphors in La Princesse de Clèves, by Julia V. Douthwaite, 109–19.
    6. Truly Inimitable? Repetition in La Princesse de Clèves, by Louise K. Horowitz, 120–26.
  C. Specific Teaching Contexts
    1. Teaching La Princesse de Clèves in Translation, by Faith E. Beasley, 127–38.
    2. What’s Love Got to Do with It? The Issue of Vulnerability in an Anthological Approach, by James F. Gaines, 139–46.
    3. Romance and Novel in La Princesse de Clèves, by Kathleen Wine, 147–57.
    4. Reading La Princesse de Clèves with the Heptaméron, by John D. Lyons, 158–64.
    5. Mediation of Desire in La Princesse de Clèves, by Anne Callahan, 165–74.
    6. Teaching La Princesse de Clèves in a Women’s Studies Course, by Elizabeth J. MacArthur, 175–82.

 

Approaches to Teaching Marguerite de Navarre’s Heptameron. Ed. Colette H. Winn. New York: Modern Language Association of America, 2007.

I. Materials
  A. French Editions, 3–5.
  B.

English Translations and Anthologies, 5–7.

  C. Required and Recommended Student Readings, 7–9.
    1. Primary Sources, 7–8.
    2. Background and Reference Works, 8.
    3. Biographical Studies, 8–9.
    4. Critical Studies, 9.
  D. The Instructor’s Library, 10–13.
    1. Primary Sources, 10
    2. Background and Reference Works, 10–11
    3. Biographical Studies, 11
    4. Critical Studies, 11–13.
  E. Aids to Teaching, 13–16.
    1. Audiovisual Materials, 13–14.
    2. Marguerite de Navarre Online, 14–16.
  F. Some Assembly Required: The Heptameron and New Media Technologies, by Sylvie L. F. Richards, 17–21.
  G. Classroom Tools, by Corinne F. Wilson
    1. Map of France in the Time of Marguerite de Navarre, 22
    2. Characteristics of the Devisants, 23
    3.

Stories Told by the Devisants, 24–25.

II. Approaches
  A. Introduction, 29–37
    1. Courses and Teaching, 29–30.
    2. Innovative Strategies, 30–33.
    3. Sample Assignments, 33–34.
    4. The Essays, 34–37.
  B. Introducing the Backgrounds and Contexts
    1. Marguerite, Lefèvre d’Étaples, and the Growth of Christian Humanism in France, by Charles G. Nauert, 38–43.
    2. Teaching a Publishing History for the Heptameron, by Susan Broomhall, 44–51.
    3. “Afin Que Vous Connaissiez, Mesdames”: The Heptameron and Conduct Literature for Women, by Kathleen M. Llewellyn, 52–56.
    4.

Reshaping the Medieval Past: Courtly Love and Beyond in the Heptameron, by Dora E. Polachek, 57–63.

    5. The Heptameron and Italy: The Case of Urbino, by Michael Sherberg, 64–69.
    6. Sexual Equality and Evangelical Neoplatonism in the Heptameron, by Philip Ford, 70–75.
  C. Critical Tools for the Classroom
    1. Aesthetics, Ethics, History, Politics, and Interpretation: Conjoining Methodological Approaches to Heptameron 32, by François Rigolot, 76–80.
    2. Narrative Complexities in the Heptameron, by Mary B.McKinley, 81–85.
    3. Narrating Feminine Consciousness in the Age of Reform, by Deborah N. Losse, 86–90.
    4. Marguerite de Navarre and the Invention of the Histoire Tragique, by Hervé Thomas Campangne, 91–96.
    5. “Pour Faire Rire la Compagnie”: Comedy and Laughter, by Geoffrey R. Hope, 97–101.
    6. Doubles, Crosses: Heptameron, Story 71, by George Hoffmann, 102–5.
    7. Fiction and Ritual in the Heptameron by Jan Miernowski, 106–12.
    8. Reading Violent Truths, by Nancy M. Frelick, 113–17.
    9. How Male Relationships Shape a Woman’s Text, by E. Joe Johnson, 118–21.
  D. Teaching the Heptameron in Relation to Other Works by Marguerite de Navarre
    1. Teaching the Heptameron with Marguerite de Navarre’s Letters, by Jane Couchman, 122–27.
    2. Of Mirrors and Silence: Mysticism in Heptameron 24, by Pascale Barthe, 128–34.
    3. All in Knots: Teaching the Heptameron with les Prisons, by Gary Ferguson, 135–40.
    4. Approaches to the Art of the Heptameron, by Tom Conley, 141–53.
    5. Dramatic Approaches to Teaching the Heptameron, by Olga Anna Duhl, 154–62.
  E. Selected Courses and Pedagogical Strategies
    1. Beyond Gist: Reading the Heptameron as a Foreign Language Text, by Hope Glidden, 163–69.
    2. In the Mood for Love: Teaching the Heptameron in a Humanities Class, by Michael Randall, 170–80.
    3. Teaching the Rhetoric of the Battle of the Sexes: Dialogues in and between the Heptameron and the Decameron, by Kathleen Long, 181–85.
    4. Reconstituting the Material Context: A Pedagogical Challenge in a Virtual Age, by Catharine Randall, 186–90.
    5.

The French Renaissance Chanson and Cultural Context in the Heptameron, by Cathy Yandell, 191–97.

    6. The Heptameron’s Tales 22 and 72 and the Visual Arts: Resisting Temptation, by Virginia Krause, 198–205.
    7. Screens of the Renaissance: Contexts and Themes of the Heptameron through Films, by Patricia Gravatt, 206–13.

 

Approaches to Teaching Teresa of Ávila and the Spanish Mystics. Ed. Alison Weber. New York: Modern Language Association of America, 2009.

 

Introduction, by Alison Weber, 1–15.

I.      
  A. Editions (Alison Weber)
    1. Anthologies in Spanish, 17
    2. Editions in Spanish, 18
    3. Bilingual Editions and Translations, 19
  B. The Instructor’s Library (Alison Weber)
    1. Reference Works, 20
    2. Historical and Literary Studies, 21
    3. Religious and Theological Studies, 24
  C. Aids to Teaching (Alison Weber)
    1. Music, 25
    2. Internet Resources, 26
    3. Illustrated Books, 27
    4. Films, 28
  D. Teresa in English Translation (Amanda Powell), 30
  E. The Language of Teresa of Ávila (Emily E. Scida), 39\
II. Approaches
  A. Historical Perspectives
    1. Mysticism in History: The Case of Spain’s Golden Age, by Elizabeth Rhodes, 47–56.
    2. Spanish Mysticism and the Islamic Tradition, by William Childers, 57–66.
    3. Teresa of Ávila and the Question of Jewish Influence, by Michael McGaha, 67–73.
    4. Was Teresa of Ávila a Feminist? By Bárbara Mujica, 74–82.
    5. After Teresa: Mysticism in Seventeenth-Century Europe, by Cordula van Wyhe, 83–93.
  B. Theoretical Perspectives
    1. The Mystical Encounter with Extremity: Teaching Teresa through Psychoanalytic Theory, by Linda Belau, 95–101.
    2. Teaching Spanish Women Mystics with Theories of Autobiography, by Sherry Valasco, 102–6.
    3. Feminist Epistemology and Pedagogy in Teresa of Ávila, by Barbara Simerka, 107–13.
  C. Specific Course Contexts
    1.

Making Mysticism Accessible to Undergraduates, by Lisa Vollendorf, 114–22.

    2. Teaching Teresa of Ávila’s The Book of Her Life in the Tradition of Western Spiritual Autobiography, by Carole Slade, 123–33.
    3. Successful Mystics and Failed Mystics: Teaching Teresa of Ávila in the Women’s Studies Classroom, by Marta V. Vicente, 134–41.
    4. Defiance and Obedience: Reading the Spanish Mystics in Historical Context, by María del Pilar Ryan, 142–47.
    5.

A Transatlantic Perspective: The Influence of Teresa’s Model on New World Women, by Kathleen Ann Myers, 148–56.

    6. The Creation of Feminist Consciousness: Teaching Teresa of Ávila in a Women Writers Course, by Alison Weber, 157–65.
    7. Strictly Academic? Teaching Religious Texts in a Secular Setting, by Ralph Keen, 166–71.
    8. Teaching Teresa as a Theologian, by Gillian T. W. Ahlgren, 172–80.
    9. Teaching Spanish Mysticism at an Undergraduate Catholic College: Issues of Relevance, Accessibility, and Self-Censorship, by Dona M. Kercher, 181–89.
    10. Where’s Teresa? The Construction of Teresa of Ávila in the Visual Arts, by Christopher C. Wilson, 190–200.
  D. Teaching Specific Texts
    1. Reading “Noche oscura” Twice, by Howard Mancing, 202–7.
2. Teresa of Ávila and Ignatius of Loyola: A Gender-Based Approach to Spiritual Autobiography, by Darcy Donahue, 208–17.
    3. Teaching Imagery and Allegory in Teresa of Ávila’s The Interior Castle, byJoan Cammarata, 218–24.
    4. Teaching Teresa’s Libro de las fundaciones (The Book of Coundations), by Helen H. Reed, 225–31.
    5. Comparing Humanist and Mystical Understanding in Luis de Léon’s “Noche serena” and John of the Cross’s “La noche oscura”, by Dana Bultman, 232–39.
    6. Teaching Luis de León’s Mystical Poetry as Pilgrimage, by David H. Darst, 240–46.
    7. Mysticism and Early Modern Musical-Cosmological Paradigms, by Mario A. Ortiz, 247–58.
     

Arcangela Tarabotti: A Literary Nun in Baroque Venice. Ed. Elissa B. Weaver. Ravenna: Longo Editore, 2006.

 

Introduction, by Elissa B. Weaver, 9–15.

I. The Venetian Context
    1.

The Permeable Cloister? By Anne Jacobson Schutte, 19–36.

    2. Venetian Convents and Civic Ritual, by Gabriella Zarri (trans. Meredith K. Ray), 37–56.
    3. Books and Politics in Arcangela Tarabotti’s Venice, by Mario Infelise (trans. Thomas Simpson), 57–72.
    4. Prose Production in Venice in the Early Seicento, by Daria Perocco (trans. Suzanne Magnanini), 73–90.
II. Arcangela Tarabotti: Life and Works
    5. Women in the Gutenberg Galaxy, by Beatrice Collina (trans. Meredith K. Ray), 91–106.
    6. Reader Over Arcangela’s Shoulder: Tarabotti at Work with her Sources, by Letizia Panizza, 107–28.
    7. Arcangela Tarabotti and Gabriel Naudé: Libraries, Taxonomies and “Ragion di Stato”, by Stephanie Jed, 129–40.
    8. “La Forza d’Amore” and the “Monaca Sforzata”: Opera, Tarabotti, and the Pleasures of Debate, by Wendy Heller, 141–58.
    9. The Trenchant Pen: Humor in the “Lettere” of Arcangela Tarabotti, by Lynn Lara Westwater, 159–72.
    10. Making the Private Public: Arcangela Tarabotti’s “Lettere familiari”, by Meredith Kennedy Ray, 173–90.
    11. Taking After Tarabotti? A Seventeenth-Century Sienese “Discorso”, by Nathalie Hester, 191–200.
    12

From Cloister to Saintliness or Glory: The Cases of Mère Angélique of Port-Royal, Arcangela Tarabotti, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, 201–12.

 

Architecture and the Politics of Gender in Early Modern Europe. Ed. Helen Hills. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2003.

I. Introduction: Theorizing the Relationships between Architecture and Gender in Early Modern Europe, by Helen Mills, 3–23.
II. Production: Architects and Patrons
    1. A Noble Residence for a Female Regent: Margaret of Austria and the “Court of Savoy” in Mechelen, by Dagmar Eichberger, 25–46.
    2. The Val-deGrâce as a Portrait of Anne of Austria: Queen, Queen Regent, Queen Mother, by Jennifer G. Germann, 47–62.
    3. The Architecture of Institutionalism: Women’s Space in Renaissance Hospitals, by Eunice D. Howe, 163–82.
    4. Women and the Practice of Architecture in Eighteenth-Century France, by Tanis Hinchcliffe, 83–96.
III. Practice and Resistance
    5. “Repaired by me to my exceeding great Cost and Charges”: Anne Clifford and the Uses of Architecture, by Elizabeth V. Chew, 99–114.
    6. “Women in Wolves’ Mouths”: Nuns’ Reputations, Enclosure, and Architecture at the Convent of the Le Murate in Florence, by Saundra Weddle, 115–30.
    7. Spatial Discipline and its Limits: Nuns and the Built Environment in Early Modern Spain, by Elizabeth A. Lehfeldt, 131–50.
    8. Spaces Shaped for Spiritual Perfection: Convent Architecture and Nuns in Early Modern Rome, by Marilyn Dunn, 151–76.
    9. Women in the Charterhouse: The Liminality of Cloistered Spaces at the Chartreuse de Champmol in Dijon, by Sherry C. M. Lindquist, 177–92.

 

The Artemisia Files: Artemisia Gentileschi for Feminists and Other Thinking People. Ed. Mieke Bal. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005.

 

Introduction, by Mieke Bal, ix

    1.

Artemisia’s Hand, by Mary D. Garrard, 1–32.

    2. Judging Artemisia: A Baroque Woman in Modern Art History, by Nanette Solomon, 33–62.
    3. “Gran Macchina è Bellezza: Looking at the Gentileschi Judiths, by Elena Ciletti, 63–106.
    4. Death, Dispassion, and the Female Hero: Artemisia Gentileschi’s Jael and Sisera, by Babette Bohn, 107–28.
    5.

Grounds of Comparison, by Mieke Bal, 129–68.

    6. Feminist Dilemmas with the Art/Life Problem, by Griselda Pollock, 169–206.

 

Attending to Women in Early Modern England. Ed. Betty S. Travitsky and Adele F. Seeff. Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1994.

 

Introduction, by Betty S. Travitsky, 13–32.

I. Disciplinary Conventions and Interdisciplinary Perspectives
    1. “O Daughter Heare”: Reconstructing the Lives of Aristocratic Englishwomen, by Margaret P. Hannay, 35–63.
    2.

Positioning Women in Visual Convention: The Case of Elizabeth I, by Nanette Salomon, 64–95.

    3.

Response: Attending to Early Moderen Women in an Interdisciplinary Way, by Judith Bennett, 96–102.

II.

Keynote Address: Unpicking the Tapestry: The Scholar of Women’s History as Penelope among her Suitors, by Lisa Jardine, 123–44.

III.

Structuring Public and Private Selves

    4.

The Message from Marcade: Parental Death in Tudor and Stuart England, by Heather Dubrow, 147–67.

    5.

Eulogies for Women: Public Testimony of their Godly Example and Leadership, by Retha M. Warnicke, 168–86.

    6.

Response: Private Lives, Public Performance and Rites of Passage, by David Cressy, 187–97.

IV. Visible Women, Invisible Women
    7.

Elizabeth I and Alice Balstone: Gender, Class, and the Exceptional Woman in Early Modern England, by Susan Dwyer Amussen, 219–40.

    8.

The Paradox of Mimesis: The High Art/Low Art in the Imagery of Early Modern Europe, by Keith Moxey, 241–64.

    9.

Response: Attending to Literacy, by Margaret Ferguson, 265–79.

V. Pedagogy
    10. Remodeling the Landlord’s House: Ownership of the Canon, by Jean R. Brink, 301–18.
    11. Appendix: Responses to a Pedagogy Survey, Jean R. Brink, compiler, 319–35.
VI.     Performance
    12. Attending to Renaissance Women: A Script and its Evolution, by Catherine Schuler, and Sharon Ammen, 343–55.

 

Attending to Early Modern Women. Ed. Susan D. Amussen and Adele Seeff. Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1998.

I.

Our Subjects, Our Selves

    1. Displacing and Displeasing: Writing about Women in the EM Period, by Natalie Zemon Davis, 25–37
    2. The Phallacies of Authorship: Reconstructing the Texts of EM Women Writers, by Josephine A. Roberts, 38–57
    3. Weaving with Clio and Moriscas of Early Modern Spain, by Mary Elizabeth Perry, 58–73
    4. The Roles of Women in Challenging the Canon of ‘Great Master’ Art History, by Corine Schleif, 74-92
II. Women’s Places
    5. Women’s Community and Male Spies: Erhard Schön’s How Seven Women Complain about Their Worthless Husbands, by Diane Wolfthal, 117–54
    6. Apostrophes to Cities: Urban Rhetorics in Isabella Whitney and Moderate Fonte, by Ann Rosalind Jones, 155–75
III. Placing Women
    7. Positioning Herself: A Renaissance-Reformation Diptych, by Catharine Randall, 199–229
    8. Yellow Ruffs and Poisoned Possets: Placing Women in Early Stuart Political Debate, by David Underdown, 244–60
IV. Teaching a Gendered Renaissance
    9. Changing Our Originary Stories: Renaissance Women on Education, and Conversation as a Model for Our Classrooms, by Jane Donawerth, 263–77
    10. Putting Women into the Picture: Gender and Art History in the Classroom, by Sheila Folliott, 278–96
    11. The Hubris of Writing Surveys a Feminist Confronts the Textbook, by Merry Wiesner-Hanks, 297–310

 

Becoming Visible: Women in European History. Ed. Renate Bridenthal, Claudia Koonz, and Susan M. Stuard. 3d ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1998.

    6. The Domination of Gender: Women’s Fortunes in the High Middle Ages, by Susan Stuard, 153–72
    7. Did Women Have a Renaissance? By Joan Kelly-Gadol, 175-201
    8. Protestant Wives, Catholic Saints, and the Devil’s Handmaid: Women in the Age of Reformation, by William Monter, 203–19
    9. Spinning our Capital: Women’s Work in the Early Modern Economy, by Merry E. Wiesner, 221–49.

 

Beyond Bondage: Free Women of Color in the Americas. Ed. David Barry Gaspar and Darlene Clark. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2004.

I. Achieving and Preserving Freedom
    1. Maroon Women in Colonial Spanish America: Case Studies in the Circum-Caribbean from the Sixteenth through the Eighteenth Centuries, by Jane Landers, 3–18.
    2. Of life and Freedom at the (tropical) Hearth: El Cobre, Cuba, 1709–73, by María Elena Díaz, 19–36.
    3. In the shadow of the plantation : women of color and the Livres de fait of Martinique and Guadeloupe, 1685-1848, by Bernard Moitt, 37–59.
    4. “To be free is very sweet”: The Manumission of Female Slaves in Antigua, 1817–26, by David Barry Gaspar, 60–81.
    5. “Do thou in gentle Phibia smile”: Scenes from an interracial Marriage, Jamaica, 1754–86, by Trevor Burnard, 82–105.
    6. The Fragile Nature of Freedom: Free Women of Color in the U.S. South, by Loren Schweninger, 106–26.
    7. Out of Bounds : Emancipated and Enslaved Women in Antebellum America, by Wilma King, 127–44.
    8. Free Black and Colored Women in early-nineteenth-century Paramaribo, Suriname, by Rosemarijn Hoefte and Jean Jacques Vrij, 145–68.
    9. Ana Paulinha de Queirós, Joaquina da Costa, and their Neighbors : Free Women of Color as Household Heads in Rural Bahia (Brazil), 1835, by B. J. Barickman and Martha Few, 169–201.
    10. Libertas Citadinas: Free Women of Color in San Juan, Puerto Rico, by Félix V. Matos Rodríguez, 202–18.
    11. Landlords, Shopkeepers, Farmers, and Slaveowners: Free Black Female Property-holders in Colonial New Orleans, by Kimberly S. Hanger, 219–36.
    12. Free Women of Color in Central Brazil, 1779–1832, by Mary C. Karasch, 237–70.
    13. Henriette Delille, Free Women of Color, and Catholicism in Antebellum New Orleans, 1727–1852, by Virginia Meacham Gould, 271–85.
    14. Religious Women of Color in seventeenth-century Lima : Estefania de San Ioseph and Ursula de Jesu Christo, by Alice L. Wood., 286–316.

 

Beyond the Exotic: Women’s Histories in Islamic Societies. Ed. Amira El Azhary Sonbol. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 2005.

 

Introduction, by Amira El Azhary Sonbol, xvii

I.

Scripture

    1. History Then, History Now: The role of Medieval Religio-Political Islamic Sources in Shaping the Modern Debate on Gender, by Denise A. Spellberg, 3–14.
    2.

The Qur’an and History, Barbara Freyer Stowasser, 15–36.

    3. Muslim Women: Public Authority, Scriptures, and “Islamic Law”, by Haifaa Khalafallah, 37–51.
II. Church Records
    4. Gendered Sources in Ethnohistorical Research: The Study of Immigration from a Lebanese Village, by Patricia Mihaly Nabti, 53–70.
    5. Individualism and Political Modernity: Devout Catholic Women in Aleppo and Lebanon between the Seventeenth and Nineteenth Centuries, by Bernard Heyberger, 71–86.
III. Awqaf
    6.

Women, Patronage, and Charity in Ottoman Istanbul, by Fariba Zarinebaf, 89–101.

    7. Consciousness of Self: The Muslim Woman as Creator and Manager of Waqf Foundations in Late Ottoman Damascus, by Randi Deguilhem, 102–16.
IV.

The Archival Records

    8. Sources for the Study of Slave Women and Concubines in Ottoman Egypt, by Nelly Hanna, 119–30.
    9. Thoughts on Women and Slavery in the Ottoman Era and Historical Sources, by Madeline Zilfi, 131–38.
    10. Observations on the Use of Shar’ia Court Records as a Source of Social History, by Ramadan al-Khowli, 139–51.
    11. Mahkama Records as a Source for Women’s History: The Case of Constantine, by Fatima Zohra Guechi, 152–62.
V. The Legal Record
    12. “And God Knows Best”: The Fatwa as a Source for the History of Gender in the Arab World, by Judith E. Tucker, 165–79.
    13. Gender Violence in Kanunnames and Fetvas of the Sixteenth Century, by Elyse Semerdjian, 180–97.
    14. Mixed and Other Courts: Women and Modern Patriarchy, by Amira El-Azhary Sonbol, 198–226.
    15. Islamic Personal Law in American Courts, by Richard Freeland, 227–46.
VI. The Written Record: Textbooks and Discourses
    16. Learning Gendered Modernity: The Home, the Family, and the Schoolroom in the Construction of Egyptian National Identity (1885–1919), by Lisa Pollard, 249–69.
    17. The Use of Textbooks as a Source of History for Women: The Case of turn-of-the-century Egypt, by Mona Russell, 270–94.
    18. Sources on the Education of Ottoman Women in the Prime Ministerial Ottoman Archive for the Period of Reforms in the Nineteenth and early Twentieth Centuries, by Selcuk Aksin Somel, 295–306.
    19. The History of the Discourses on History and Islamism in Contemporary Egypt (1980–1990), by Mervat E. Hatem, 307–18.
VII.

Art and Architecture

    20. Female Patronage of Mamluk Architecture in Cairo, by Howayda al-Harithy, 321–35.
    21. Islamic Art as a Source for the Study of Women in Premodern Societies, by Sheila S. Blair, 336–46.
    22. Discerning the Hand-of-Fatima: An iconological Investigation of the Role of Gender in Religious Art, by Diane Apostolos-Cappadona, 347–63.
VIII. Popular Culture and Oral Tradition
    23. Oral Traditions as a Source for the Study of Muslim Women: Women in the Sufi Orders, by Valerie J. Hoffman, 365–80.
    24. Political Science Without Clothes: Politics of Dress; or Contesting the Spatiality of the State of Italy, by Mamoun Fandy, 381–400.
   

Notes, 401–58.

 

Beyond Isabella: Secular Women Patrons of Art in Renaissance Italy. Ed. Sheryl E. Reiss and David G. Wilkins. Kirksville, MO: Truman State University Press, 2001.

 

Introduction: Recognizing New Patrons, Posing New Questions, by David G. Wilkins. 1–18.

    1.

Fina da Carrara, nee Buzzacarini: Consort, Mother, and Patron of Art in Trecento Padua, by Benjamin G. Kohl, 19–36.

    2. Controlling Women or Women Controlled? Suggestions for Gender Roles and Visual Culture in the Italian Renaissance Palace, by Roger J. Crum, 37–50.
    3. The Women Patrons of Neri di Bicci, by Rosi Prieto Gilday, 51–76.
    4. Caterina Piccolomini and the Palazzo delle Papesse in Siena, by A. Lawrence Jenkens, 77–92.
    5. Renaissance Husbands and Wives as Patrons of Art: The Camerini of Isabella d’Este and Francesco II Gonzaga, by Molly Bourne, 93–124.
    6. Widow, Mother, Patron of Art: Alfonsina Orsini de’ Medici, by Sheryl E. Reiss, 125–58.
    7. Two Emilian Noblewomen and Patronage Networks in the Cinquecento, by Katherine A. McIver, 159–76.
    8. Dutiful Widows: Female Patronage and Two Marian Altarpieces by Parmigianino, by Mary Vaccaro, 177–92.
    9. Vittoria Colonna and the Commission for a Mary Magdalene by Titian, by Marjorie Och, 193–224.
    10. Bronzino in the Service of Eleonora di Toledo and Cosimo I de’ Medici: Conjugal Patronage and the Painter-Courtier, by Bruce L. Edelstein,. 225–62.
    11. A Medici Miniature: Juno and a Woman with “Eyes in Her Head Like Two Stars in Their Beauty”, by Gabrielle Langdon,. 263–300.
    12. A Widow’s Choice: Alessandro Allori’s Christ and the Adulteress in the Church of Santo Spirito at Florence, by Elizabeth Pilliod, 301–16.
    13. Matrons and Motives: Why Women Built in Early Modern Rome, by Carolyn Valone, 317–36.

 

Beyond Their Sex: Learned Women of the European Past. Ed. Patricia A. Labalme. New York: New York University Press, 1980.

    1. Introduction, by Patricia Labalme, 1-8.
    2. The Education of Women in the Middle Ages in Theory, Fact, and Fantasy, by Joan M. Ferrante, 9–42
    3. Women, Learning, and Power: Eleonora of Aragon and the Court of Ferrara, by Werner L. Gundersheimer, 43–65.
    4. Book-Lined Cells: Women and Humanism in the Early Italian Renaissance, by Margaret L. King, 66–90.
    5.

Learned Women of Early Modern Italy: Humanists and University Scholars, by Paul Oskar Kristeller, 91–116.

    6. Learned Women in the Europe of the Sixteenth Century, by Roland H. Bainton, 117–28.
    7. Women’s Roles in Early Modern Venice: An Exceptional Case, by Patricia H. Labalme, 129–52.
    8. Gender and Genre: Women as Historical Writers, 1400–1820, by Natalie Zemon David, 153–82.

 

The Cambridge Companion to Early Modern Women’s Writing. Ed. Laura Lunger Knoppers. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009.

 

Chronologies, xiii–xxvii.

  Introduction: Critical Framework and Issues, by Laura Knoppers, 1–17.
I. Material Matters
    1. Women’s Handwriting, by Heather Wolfe, 21–39.
    2. Reading Women, by Edith Snook, 40–53.
    3. Manuscript Miscellanies, by Victoria E. Burke, 54–67.
    4. Women, the Material Book and Early Printing, by Marcy L. North, 68–82.
II. Sites of Production
    5. Women in Educational Spaces, by Caroline Bowden, 85–96.
    6. Women in the Household, by Wendy Wall, 97–109.
    7. Women in Church and in Devotional Spaces, by Elizabeth Clarke, 110–23.
    8.

Women in the Royal Courts, by Karen Britland, 124–39.

    9. Women in the Law Courts, by Frances E. Dolan, 140–52.
    10. Women in Healing Spaces, by Mary E. Fissell, 153–64.
III. Genres and Modes
    11. Translation, by Danielle Clarke, 167–80.
    12. Letters, by James Daybell, 181–93.
    13. Autobiography, by Ramona Wray, 194–207.
    14. Lyric Poetry, by Helen Wilcox, 208–20.
    15. Narrative Poetry, by Susanne Woods, 222–34.
    16. Prophecy and Religious Polemic, by Hilary Hinds, 235–46.
    17. Private Drama, by Marta Straznicky, 247–59.
    18. Public Drama, by Derek Hughes, 260–71.
    19. Prose Fiction, by Lori Humphrey Newcomb, 272–86.

 

Cavendish and Shakespeare: Interconnections. Ed. and introd. Katherine Romack and James Fitzmaurice. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2006.

 

Introduction, by Katherine Romack and James Fitzmurice, 1–6.

    1. “Thou art a Moniment, without a tombe”: Affiliation and Memoralization in Margaret Cavendish’s Playes and Plays, never before Printed, by Shannon Miller, 7–28.
    2. Shakespeare, Cavendish, and Reading Aloud in Seventeenth-Century England, by James Fitzmaurice, 29–46.
    3. Drama’s Olio: A New Way to Serve Old Ingredients in The Religious and The Matrimonial Trouble, by Erna Kelly, 47–62.
    4. Dining at the Table of Sense: Cavendish, Shakespeare, and The Convent of Pleasure, by Brandie R. Siegfried, 63–84.
    5. Testifying in the Court of Public Opinion: Margaret Cavendish Reworks The Winter’s Tale, by Alexandra G. Bennett, 85–102.
    6. Gender, the Political Subject, and Dramatic Authorship: Margaret Cavendish’s Loves Adventures and the Shakespearean Example, by Mihoko Suzuki, 103–20.
    7. Old Playwrights, Old Soldiers, New Martial Subjects: The Cavendishes and the Drama ofSoldiery, by Vimala C. Pasupathi, 121–46.
    8. Enlarging Margaret: Cavendish, Shakespeare, and French Women Warriors and Writers, by Amy Scott-Douglass, 147–78.
    9. The Unnatural Tragedy and Familial Absolutisms, by Karen Raber, 179–92.
    10.

“I wonder she should be so infamous for a Whore?” Cleopatra Restored, by Katherine Romack, 193–212.

 

Choosing the Better Part: Anna Maria van Schurman (1607–1678). Ed. Mirjam de Baar, Machteld Löwensteyn, Marit Monteiro, and A. Agnes Sneller. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1996.

    1. Anna Maria van Schurman: A Historical Survey of Her Reception since the Seventeenth Century, by Mirjam de Baar and Brita Rang, 1–22.
    2. “An Exceptional Mind”: The Learned Anna Maria van Schurman, by Brita Rang, 23–42.
    3. The First Dutch Feminist Tract? Anna Maria van Schurman’s Discussion of Women’s Aptitude for the Study of Arts and Sciences, by Caroline van Eck, 43–54.
    4. “Et ses artistes mains...”: The Art of Anna Maria van Schurman, by Katlijne Van der Stighelen, 55–68.
    5. “O Utreght, Lieve Stad...”: Poems in Dutch by Anna Maria van Schurman, by Pieta van Beek, 69–86.
    6. “Now as for the faint rumours of fame attached to my name...”: The Eukleria as Autobiography, by Mirjam de Baar, 87–102.
    7. Anna Maria van Schurman’s “Reformation” of Philosophy, by Angela Roothaan, 103–16.
    8. On Anna Maria van Schurman’s “RightChoice”, by Erica Scheenstra, 117–32.
    9. “If she had been a man...”: Anna Maria van Schurman in the Social and Literary Life of Her Age, by A. Agnes Sneller, 133–50.

Christine de Pizan: A Casebook. Ed. Barbara K. Altmann and Deborah L. McGrady. New York: Routledge, 2003.

I. Christine in Context
    1.  
    2. “Christine de Pizan and the Political Life in Late Medieval France,” by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski, 9–24
    3. “Christine de Pizan as Translator and Voice of the Body Politic,” by Lori J. Walters, 25–42
    4. “Somewhere between Destructive Glosses and Chaos: Christine de Pizan and Medieval Theology,” by Jeffrey Richards, 43–55
    5. “Christine de Pizan: Memory’s Architect,” by Margarete Zimmermann, 55–77
II. Building a Female Community
    6. “Christine de Pizan as a Defender of Women,” by Rosalind Brown-Grant, 81–100
    7. “Christine’s Treasure: Women’s Honor and Household Economics in the Livre des trois vertus,” by Roberta L. Krueger, 101–14
    8.

“Who’s a Heroine: The Example of Christine de Pizan,” by Thelma Fenster, 115–28

    9. Le Livre de la cité des dames: Reconfiguring Knowledge and Reimagining Gendered Space,” by Judith L. Kellogg, 129–46
III. Christine’s Writings
    10.

“Love as Metaphor in Christine de Pizan’s Ballade Cycles,” by Tracy Adams, 149–65

    11.

“The Querelle de la Rose and the Ethics of Reading,” by Marilynn Desmond, 167–80

    12. “The Lessons of Experience and the Chemin de long estude,” by Andrea Tarnowski, 181–98
    13. “The Livre de l’advision Cristine,” by Liline Dulac and Christine Reno, 199–214
    14. “‘Nous deffens de feu,...de pistilence, de guerres’: Christine de Pizan’s Religious Works,” by Maureen Boulton, 215–28
IV. Christine’s Books
    15.

“Christine and the Manuscript Tradition,” by James Laidlaw, 231–49

    16. “Modern Editions: Makers of the Christinian Corpus,” by Nadia Margolis, 251–70

 

Christine de Pizan 2000: Studies on Christine de Pizan in Honour of Angus J. Kennedy. Ed. John Campbell and Nadia Margolis (Amsterdam and Atlanta, GA, 2000).

 

Introduction: Christine at 600

    1. The State of Christine de Pizan Studies for the Second Millennium,” by Nadia Margolis, 31–45.
I. “Le stile a moy naturel”: Language, Poetics, Style
    2. Through the Byways of Lyric and Narrative: The Voiage d’oultemer in the Ballade Cycles of Christine de Pizan, by Barbara K. Altmann, 49–64.
    3. Christine de Pizan: Feminist Linguist Avant la Lettre?, by Rosalind Brown-Grant, 65–76.
    4. “Si bas suis qu’a peine/Releveray”: Christine de Pizan’s Use of Enjambment, by Peter V. Davies, 77–90.
    5. Quelques éléments d’une poétique de l’exemple dans Le Cours de policie, 91–104.
    6. Perspectives on the Advision, by Andrea W. Tarnowski, 105–14.
    7. Mimesis meets Artifice: Two Poems of Christine de Pizan, by Jane H. M. Taylor, 115–24.
II. “Ficcions delictables et morales”: Thematics and Topics
    8. Christine de Pizan and Alexander the Great, by Glynnis M. Cropp (126–34)
    9. Christine at Carnant: Reading Christine de Pizan Reading Chrétien de Troyes’s Erec et Enide, by Thelma Fenster, 135–48.
    10. Christine de Pizan et la figure de la mère, by Bernard Ribémont, 149–61.
    11. Christine’s Guided Tour of the Sale Merveilleuse: On Reactions to Reading and being Guided round Medieval Murals in Real and Imaginary Buildings, by Kenneth Varty, 163–75.
III. Courts, Convents and Codices Creative milieux
    12. Où mène le Chemin de long estude? Christine de Pizan, Ambrogio Migli, et les ambitions impériales de Louis d’Orléans (a propos du ms. BNF fr. 1643),” by Gilbert Ouy and Christine M. Reno, 177–95.
    13. Christine de Pizan and Jean Gerson: An Intellectual Friendship, by Earl Jeffrey Richards, 197–208.
    14. The Dominican Abbey of Poissy in 1400, by Charity Cannon Willard, 209–19.
IV.

“Le ventre de la mémoire”: Sources, Influences, Reception

    15. Excerpts and Originality: Authorial Purpose in the Fais et bonnes meurs, by Eric Hicks, 221–31
    16.

Maurice Roy (1856–1932), by James C. Laidlaw, 233–50.

    17. The Poem’s Progress: Christine’s Autres Ballades no. 42 and the Fortunes of a Text, by Nadia Margolis, 251–62.
    18.

Pour la réception de Christine de Pizan en Italie: L’Arte del Rimare de Giovanni M. Barbieri, by Gianni Mombello, 263–82.

    19. Translating’ Petrarch: Cité des dames II.7.1, Jean Daudin, and Vernacular Authority” by Lori Walters, 283–97.

 

Christine de Pizan and the Categories of Difference, ed. Marilynn Desmond (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1998)

I. The Belly of the Monster
    1. Christine de Pizan on the Art of Warfare, by Charity Cannon Willard, 3–15.
    2. Christine’s Anxious Lessons: Gender, Morality, and the Social Order from the Enseignemens to the Avision, by Roberta Krueger, 16–40.
    3. “Douleur sur toutes autres”: Revisualizing the Rape Script in the Epistre Othea and the Cité des dames,” by Diane Wolfthal, 41–70.
    4. Christine de Pizan and the Authority of Experience, by Mary Anne C. Case, 71–87.
II. Situated Knowledge
    5. “Perdre son Latin”: Christine de Pizan and Vernacular Humanism, by Thelma Fenster, 91–107.
    6. The Critique of Knowledge as Power: The Limits of Philosophy and Theology in Christine de Pizan, by Benjamin M. Semple, 108–26.
    7. The Bath of the Muses and Visual Allegory in the Chemin de long estude, by Mary Weitzel Gibbons, 128–45.
    8. “Traittié tout de mençonges”: The Secrets des dames, “Trotula,” and Attitudes toward Women’s Medicine in Fourteenth- and Early-Fifteenth-Century France,” by Monica H. Green, 146–78.
III. Engendering Authorship
    9. Transforming Ovid: The Metamorphosis of Female Authority, by Judith L. Kellogg, 181–94.
    10. What is a Patron? Benefactors and Authorship in Harley 4431, Christine de Pizan’s Collected Works, by Deborah McGrady, 195–214.
    11. The Reconstruction of an Author in Print: Christine de Pizan in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries, by Cynthia J. Brown, 215–35.
    12. Arms and the Bride: Christine de Pizan’s Military Treatise as a Wedding Gift for Margaret of Anjou, by Michel-André Bossy, 236–56.

 

The City of Scholars: New Approaches to Christine de Pizan, ed. Margarete Zimmermann and Dina De Rentiis (Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter, 1994)

    1. Christine de Pizan and Classical Mythology: Some examples from the Mutacion de Fortune, by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski, 3–14.
    2. Christine de Pizan and Sacred History, by Earl Jeffrey Richards, 15–30.
    3. A Clerk In Name Only—A Clerk In All But Name. The Misogamous Tradition and La Cité des Dames, by Glenda McLeod and Katharina Wilson, 67-76.
    4. Maternity and Paternity in La Mutacion de Fortune, by Andrea Tarnowski, 116–26.
    5. Reflecting Heroes: Christine de Pizan and the Mirror Tradition, by Kate Langdon Forhan, 189–96.

Clothing Culture, 1350–1650
. Ed. Catherine Richardson. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2004.
    1. Introduction, by Catherine Richardson, 1–27.
I. Fabrics of Nations
    2. The Cultural Significance of Costume Books in Sixteenth-Century Europe, by Ulrike Ilg, 29–48.
    3. A Question of Nation: Foreign Clothes on the English Subject, by Roze Hentschell, 49–62.
    4. Tomb Effigies and Archaic Dress In Sixteenth-Century Ireland, by Elizabeth Wincott Heckett, 63–76.
    5. The Formation of Russian Women’s Costume at the Time before the Reforms of Peter the Great, by Oksana Sekatcheva, 77–93.
II. Marking Distinctions
    6. Clothing Courtesans: Fabrics, Signals, and Experiences, by Tessa Storey, 95–108.
    7. Clothing the Naked in Late Medieval East Kent, by Sheila Sweetinbergh, 109–22.
    8. Dress, Nudity and Calvinist Culture in Sixteenth-Century France, by Graeme Murdock, 123–36.
    9. Social Fabric in Thynne’s Debate between Pride and Lowliness, by Claire Bartram, 137–51.
III. Material Movements
    10. Clothing Distributions and Social Relations, c. 1350–1500, by Joanna Crawford, 153–64.
    11. Fashion, Finance, Foreign Politics and the Wardrobe of Henry VIII, by Maria Hayward, 165–78.
    12. Reworked Material: Discourses of Clothing Culture in Early Sixteenth-Century Greenwich, by Elisabeth Salter, 179–92.
IV. Discourse, Body, Gender
    13. “This one poore blacke gowne lined with white”: The Clothing of the Sixteenth-Century English Book, by Helen Smith, 195–208.
    14. “Havying nothing upon hym saving onely his sherte”: Event, Narrative and Material Culture in Early Modern England, by Catherine Richardson, 209–22.
    15. Rips and Slits: The Torn Garment and the Medieval Self, by Andrea Denny-Brown, 223–38.
    16. Speaking to Reveal: The Body and Acts of “Exposure” in Early Modern Popular Discourse, by Elizabeth Hallam, 239–62.

 

A Companion to Early Modern Women’s Writing. Ed. Anita Pacheco and Arturo Pacheco. Oxford: Blackwell, 2002.

 

Introduction, by Anita Pacheco and Arturo Pacheco, xiv

I. Contexts, 1–2
    1. Women and Education, by Kenneth Charlton, 3–21.
    2. Religion and the Construction of the Feminine, by Diane Willen, 22–39.
    3. Women, Property and Law, by Tim Stretton, 40–57.
    4.

Women and Work, by Sara H. Mendelson, 58–77.

    5. Women and Writing, by Margaret J. M. Ezell, 77–93.
II. Readings, 95–96.
    6. Isabella Whitney, A Sweet Nosegay, by Patricia Brace, 97–109.
    7. Mary Sidney, Countess of Pembroke, Psalmes, by Debra K. Rienstra, 110–24.
    8. Aemilia Lanyer, Salve Deum Rex Judaeorum, by Susanne Woods, 125–35.
    9. Elizabeth Cary, The Tragedy of Mariam, and History, by Elaine Beilin, 136–49.
    10. Mary Wroth, The Countess of Montgomery’s Urania, by Naomi J. Miller, 150–64.
    11. Margaret Cavendish, A True Relation of my Birth, Breeding, and Life, by Gweno Williams, 165–76.
    12. Anna Trapnel, Anna Trapnel’s Report and Plea, by Hilary Hinds, 177–88.
    13. Katherine Philips, Poems, by Elizabeth H. Hageman, 189–202.
    14. Aphra Behn, The Rover, Part One, by Anita Pacheco, 203–15.
    15. Mary Astell, Critic of the Marriage Contract/Social Contract Analogue, by Patricia Springborg, 216–27.
III. Genres, 229
    16. Autobiography, by Sheila Ottway, 231–47.
    17. Defences of Women, by Frances Teague and Rebecca De Haas, 248–63.
    18. Prophecy, by Elaine Hobby, 264–81.
    19.

Women’s Poetry 1550–1700: “Not unfit to be read”, by Brouwen Price, 282–302.

    20. Prose Fiction, by Paul Salzman, 303–16.
    21. Drama, by Sophie Tomlinson, 317–36.
IV. Issues and Debates, 337
    22. The Work of Women in the Age of Electronic Reproduction: The Canon, Early Modern Women Writers, and the Postmodern Reader, by Melinda Alliker Rabb, 339–60.
    23. Feminist Historiography, by Margo Hendricks, 361–76.

 

A Companion to Gender History. Ed. Teresa A. Meade and Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2004.

 

Introduction, by Teresa A. Meade and Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks, 1–10.

I. Thematic Essays on Gender Issues in World History
    1. Sexuality, by Robert A. Nye, 11–25.
    2. Gender and Labor in World History, by Laura Levine Frader, 26–50.
    3. Structures and Meanings in a Gendered Family History, by Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks, 51–69.
    4. Religion and Gender: Embedded Patterns, Interwoven Frameworks, by Ursula King, 70–85.
    5.

Gender Rules: Law and Politics, by Susan Kingsley Kent, 86–109.

    6. Race, Gender, and Other Differences in Feminist Theory, by Deirdre Keenan, 110–28.
    7. Gender and Education Before and After Mass Schooling, by Pavla Miller, 129–45.
    8. How Images Got Their Gender: Masculinity and Femininity in the Visual Arts, by Mary D. Sheriff, 146–69.
    9.

Revolution, Nationalism, and Anti-Imperialism, by Temma Kaplan, 170–85.

    10. Feminist Movements: Gender and Sexual Equality, by Barbara Winslow, 186–208.
II. Chronological and Geographical Essays
  A. Prehistory
    11. Digging Up Gender in the Earliest Human Societies, by Marcia-Anne Dobres, 211–28.
  B. Classical and Post-Classical Societies (2000 BCE–1400 CE)
    12. Women in the Middle East, 8000 BCE to 1700 CE , by Guity Nashat, 229–48.
    13. Gendered Themes in Early African History, by David Schoenbrun, 249–72.
    14. Confucian Complexities: China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, by Vivian-Lee Nyitray, 273–84.
    15. Early Western Civilization Under the Sign of Gender: Europe and the Mediterranean, by Paul Halsall, 285–304.
    16. Gender in the Ancient Americas: From Earliest Villages to European Colonization, by Rosemary A. Joyce, 305–320.
  C. Gender and the Development of Modern Society (1400–1750)
    17. Gender History, Southeast Asia, and the “World Regionss” Framework, by Barbara Watson Andaya, 323–42.
    18. Did Gender Have a Renaissance? Exclusions and Traditions in Early Modern Western Europe, by Julie Hardwick, 343–57.
    19. Self, Society, and Gender in Early Modern Russia and Eastern Europe, by Nancy Shields Kollmann, 358–70.
    20. A New World Engendered: The Making of the Iberian Transatlantic Empires, by Verena Stolcke, 371–92.
  D. Gender and the Modern World (1750–1920)
    21. Rescued from Obscurity: Contributions and Challenges in Writing the History of Gender in the Middle East and North Africa, by Judith Tucker, 393–412.
    22. Gender, Women, and Power in Africa, 1750–1914, by Marcia Wright, 413–29.
    23. Clash of Cultures: Gender and Colonialism in South and Southeast Asia, by Nupur Chaudhuri, 430–43.
    24. From Private to Public Patriarchy: Women, Labor and the State in East Asia, 1600–1919, by Anne Walthall, 444–58.
    25. Gender in the Formation of European Power, 1750–1914, by Deborah Valenze, 459–76.
    26. Latin America and the Caribbean, by Sonya Lipsett-Rivera,  477–91.
    27. North America from North of the 49th Parallel, by Linda Kealey, 492–511.
  E. Gender in the Contemporary World (1920–2003)
    28. Frameworks of Gender: Feminism and Nationalism in Twentieth-Century Asia, by Barbara Molony, 513–39.
    29. Women and Gender Roles in Africa Since 1918: Gender as a Determinant of Status, by Sean Redding,. 540–54.
    30. Continuities Amid Change: Gender Ideas and Arrangements in Twentieth-Century Russia and Eastern Europe, by Barbara Evans Clements, 555–67.
    31.

Engendering Reform and Revolution in Twentieth-Century Latin America and the Caribbean, by Susan K. Besse, 568–85.

    32. Equality and Difference in the Twentieth-Century West: North America, Western Europe, Australia, and New Zealand, by Charles Sowerwine and Patricia Grimshaw, 586–610.

 

A Companion to Julian of Norwich. Ed. Liz Herbert McAvoy. Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2008.

 

Introduction:   ‘God forbede...that I am a techere’: Who, or what, was Julian?, by Liz Herbert McAvoy, 1–16.

I. Julian in Context
    1. Femininities and the Gentry in Late Medieval East Anglia: Ways of Being, by Kim M. Phillips, 19–31.
    2. ‘A recluse atte Norwyche’: Images of Medieval Norwich and Julian’s Revelations, by Cate Gunn, 32–41.
    3.

‘No such sitting’: Julian Tropes the Trinity, by Alexandra Barratt, 42–52.

    4. Julian of Norwich and the Varieties of Middle English Mystical Discourse, by Denise N. Baker, 53–63.
    5. Saint Julian of the Apocalypse, by Diane Watt, 64–74.
    6.

Anchoritic Aspects of Julian of Norwich, by E. A. Jones, 75–87.

    7. Julian of Norwich and the Liturgy, by Annie Sutherland, 88–98.
II. Manuscript Tradition and Interpretation
    8.

Julian’s Second Thoughts: The Long Text Tradition, by Barry Windeatt, 101–15.

    9. ‘This blessed beholdyng’: Reading the Fragments from Julian of Norwich’s A Revelation of Love in London, Westminster Cathedral Treasury, MS 4, by Marleen Cré, 116–26.
    10. The Seventeenth-Century Manuscript Tradition and the Influence of Augustine Baker, by Elisabeth Dutton, 127–38.
    11. Julian of Norwich’s ‘Modernist’ Style and the Creation of Audience, by Elizabeth Robertson, 139–53.
    12. Space and Enclosure in Julian of Norwich’s A Revelation of Love, by Laura Saetveit Miles, 154–65.
    13. ‘For we be doubel of God’s making’: Writing, Gender and the Body in Julian of Norwich, by Liz Herbert McAvoy, 166–80.
    14. Julian’s Revelation of Love: A Web of Metaphor, by Ena Jenkins, 181–91.
    15. ‘[S]he do the police in different voices’: Pastiche, Ventriloquism and Parody in Julian of Norwich, by Vincent Gillespie, 192–207.
    16. Julian’s Afterlives, by Sarah Salih, 208–18.

Connecting Spheres: European Women in a Globalizing World, 1500 to the Present
. Ed. Marilyn J. Boxer and Jean H. Quataert. New York: Oxford University Press, 2nd ed., 2000.
Part I one of three is concerned with the early modern period, as follows:
   

Overview, 1500–1750, by Marilyn J. Boxer and Joan H. Quataert, 19–52.

     

Confronting Traditions: The Origins of the “Argument about Women.” The Reformation. Political Centralization and Witchcraft. Political Centralization and the Early Modern Family. Women’s Work in the Peasant Household. Women, the Guilds, and the Urban Economy. Protoindustrialization and Women’s Work. Professionalization and Women’s Work. The Scientific Revolution and Renewed “Arguments about Women.” Political Liberalism and the Status of Women.

    1. Family and State in Early Modern France: the Marital Law Compact, by Sarah Hanley, 53–63.
    2. Women’s Work in the Changing City Economy, 1500–1650, by Merry E. Wiesner, 64–74.
    3. Communities of Women, the Religious Life, and Public Service in Eighteenth-Century France, by Olwen Hufton and Frank Tallett, 75–85.
    4. The “Science” of Embryology before the Discovery of the Ovum, by Maryanne Cline Horowitz, 86–94.
   

[Part II, 1750–1890, Women in Industrializing and Liberalizing Europe; and Part III, 1890-Present, Women in the Era of the Interventionist State.]

 

The Courtesan’s Arts: Cross-Cultural Perspectives. Ed. Martha Feldman and Bonnie Gordon. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

 

Introduction, by Bonnie Gordon and Martha Feldman, 3–26.

I. Spectacle and Performance
    1. Making a Spectacle of Her(self): The Greek Courtesan and the Art of the Present, by James Davidson, 29–51.
    2. Cutting a Good Figure: The Fashions of Venetian Courtesans in the Illustrated Albums of Early Modern Travelers, by Margaret F. Rosenthal, 52–74.
    3. “Notes of Flesh” and the Courtesan's Song in Seventeenth-Century China, by Judith T. Zeitlin, 75–101.
II. A Case Study: The Courtesan's Voice in Early Modern Italy. Introduction, by Martha Feldman, 103–5.
    4. The Courtesan's Voice: Petrarchan Lovers, Pop Philosophy, and Oral Traditions, by Martha Feldman, 105–23.
    5. On Hearing the Courtesan in a Gift of Song: The Venetian Case of Gaspara Stampa, by Dawn De Rycke, 124–32.
    6. On Locating the Courtesan in Italian Lyric: Distance and the Madrigal Texts of Costanzo Festa, by Justin Flosi, 133–43.
    7. On Music Fit for a Courtesan: Representations of the Courtesan and Her Music in Sixteenth-Century Italy, by Drew Edward Davies, 144–58.
III.

Power, Gender, and the Body

    8. Royalty's Courtesans and God's Mortal Wives: Keepers of Culture in Precolonial India, by Doris M. Srinivasan, 161–81.
    9. The Courtesan's Singing Body as Cultural Capital in Seventeenth-Century Italy, by Bonnie Gordon, 182–98.
    10. Defaming the Courtesan: Satire and Invective in Sixteenth-Century Italy, by Courtney Quaintance, 199–208.
    11. The Masculine Arts of the Ancient Greek Courtesan: Male Fantasy or Female Self-representation? by Christopher A. Faraone, 209–20.
IV. Excursus: Geisha Dialogues
    12. The City Geisha and Their Role in Modern Japan: Anomaly or Artistes? by Lesley Downer, 223–43.
    13. In the Service of the Nation: Geisha and Kawabata Yasunari’s Snow Country, by Miho Matsugu, 243–53.
V. Fantasies of the Courtesan 14. Going to the Courtesans: Transit to the Pleasure District of Edo Japan, by Timon Screech, 255–79.
    15. Who's Afraid of Giulia Napolitana? Pleasure, Fear, and Imagining the Arts of the Renaissance Courtesan, by Guido Ruggiero, 280–94.
VI. Courtesans in the Postcolony
    16. The Twentieth-Century “Disappearance” of the Gisaeng during the Rise of Korea's Modern Sex-and-Entertainment Industry, by Joshua D. Pilzer, 295–311.
    17. Female Agency and Patrilineal Constraints: Situating Courtesans in Twentieth-Century India, by Regula Burckhardt Qureshi, 312–31.
    18. Tawa'if, Tourism, and Tales: The Problematics of Twenty-First-Century Musical Patronage for North India's Courtesans, by Amelia Maciszewski, 332–52.
   

Appendix. CD Notes and Texts, 353.

 

The Crannied Wall: Women, Religion, and the Arts in Early Modern Europe. Ed. Craig A. Monson. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1992.

   

Introduction, by Craig A. Monson, 1–15.

    1. Open Monasteries for Women in Late Medieval and Early Modern Italy: Two Roman Examples, by Katherine Gill, 15–48.
    2. Roman Matrons as Patrons: Various Views of the Cloister Wall, by Carolyn Valone, 49–72.
    3. The Convent Wall in Tuscan Convent Drama, by Elissa B. Weaver, 73–86.
    4. The Personal and the Paradigm: The Book of Maria Domitilla Galluzzi, by E. Ann Matter, 87–104.
    5. Inquisition and Female Autobiography: The Case of Cecilia Ferrazzi, by Anne Jacobson Schutte, 105–18.
    6. The Woman / The Witch: Variations on a Sixteenth-Century Theme (Paracelsus, Wier, Bodin), by Gerhild Scholz Williams, 119–38.
    7. Music and Dancing with Mary Magdalen in a Laura Vestalis, by H. Colin Slim, 139–60.
    8. Infiamma il mio cor: Savonarolan Laude by and for Dominican Nuns in Tuscany, by Patrick Macey, 161–90.
    9.

Disembodied Voices: Music in the Nunneries of Bologna in the Midst of the Counter-Reformation, by Craig A. Monson, 191–210.

    10. The Traditions of Milanese Convent Music and the Sacred Dialogues of Chiara Margarita Cozzolani, by Robert Kendrick, 211–34.

 

Creative Women in Medieval and Early Modern Italy: A Religious and Artistic Renaissance. Ed. E. Ann Matter and John Coakley. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1994

    1. Introduction: Women’s Creativity in Religious Context, by John Coakley, 1–16.
I. Women’s Religious Expression: Thirteenth to Fifteenth Centuries
    2. The Feminine Mind in Medieval Mysticism, by Mariateresa Fumagalli Beonio-Brocchieri, 19–33.
    3. The Authorial Role of Brother A. In the Composition of Angela of Foligno’s Revelations, by Catherine M. Mooney, 34–63.
    4. Women and the Production of Religious Literature in the Vernacular, 1300–1500, by Katherine Gill, 64–104.
    5. Urban Spaces, Women’s Networks, and the Lay Apostolate in the Siena of Catherine Benincasa, 105–19.
    6. Chiara Gambacorta of Pisa as Patroness of the Arts, by Ann M. Roberts, 120–54.
II. Women’s Religious Expression: Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries
    7. Piety and Patronage: Women and the Early Jesuits, by Carolyn Valone, 157–84.
    8. Per Speculum in Enigmate: Failed Saints, Artists, and Self-Construction of the Female Body in Early Modern Italy, by Anne Jacobson Schutte, 185–200.
    9. The Commentary on the Rule of Clare of Assisi by Maria Domitilla Galluzzi, by E. Ann Matter, 212–36.
    10. The Mystic Humanism of Maria Maddalena de’ Pazzi (1566–1607), by Antonio Riccardi, 212–36.
    11. Ursula and Catherine: The Marriage of Virgins in the Sixteenth Century, by Gabriella Zarri, 237–78.
III. Women’s Artistic Expression: Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries
    12. Suor Maria Clemente Ruoti, Playwright and Academician, by Elissa B. Weaver, 281–96.
    13. The Making of Lucrezia Orsina Vizzana’s Componimenti Musicali (1623), by Craig A. Monson, 297–323.
    14. Four Views of Milanese Nuns’ Music, by Robert L. Kendrick, 324–42.

 

Critical Tales: New Studies of the Heptameron and Early Modern Culture. Ed. John D. Lyons and Mary B. McKinley. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1993.

 

Introduction, ix–xii, by the editors.

I. Generic Transformations and Graphic Transgressions
    1. Inmost Cravings: The Logic of Desire in the Heptameron, by Robert D. Cottrell, 3–24.
    2. Gender, Essence, and the Feminine (Heptameron 43), by Hope Glidden, 25–40.
    3. The Rhetoric of Lyricism in the Heptameron, by Marcel Tetel, 41–52.
    4. “La Malice des hommes”: “L’Histoire des satyres” and the Heptameron, by Donald Stone, 53–64.
    5. The Graphics of Dissimulation: Between Heptameron 10 and l’histoire tragique, by Tom Conley, 65–81.
II.

Narrative Systems and Structures

    6. Modular Narrative and the Crisis of Interpretation, by Michel Jeanneret, 85–103.
    7. “Voylà, mes dames...”: Inscribed Women Listeners and Readers in the Heptameron, by Cathleen M. Bauschatz, 104–22.
    8. Naked Narrator: Heptameron 62, by François Cornilliat and Ullrich Langer, 123–45.
    9. Telling Secrets: Sacramental Confession and Narrative Authority in the Heptameron, by Mary B. McKinley, 146–71.
    10. The Voice of the Narrators in Marguerite de Navarre’s Tales, by Philippe de Lajarte, 172–87.
    11.

Rules of the Game, by André Tournon, 188–99.

III. Character and Community
    12. Some Ways of Structuring Character in the Heptameron, by Daniel Russell, 203–17.
    13. The Heptameron and the “Magdalen Controversy”: Dialogue and Humanist Hermeneutics, by François Rigolot, 218–31.
    14.

Writing the Body: Androgynous Strategies in the Heptameron, 232–40.

    15. “Et puis, quelles nouvelles?”: The Project of Marguerite’s Unfinished Decameron, by Edwin M. Duval, 241–62.
   

Critical Tales: An Epilogue, by the editors, 263–80.

 

Crossing Boundaries: Attending to Women in Early Modern Europe. Ed. Jane Donawerth and Adele Seeff. Cranbury, NJ: Associated University Presses, 2000.

 

Introduction, by Anne Lake Prescott, 11–27.

I. The Body and the Self
    1. Dissecting the Female Body: From Woman’s Secrets to the Secrets of Nature, by Katharine Park, 29–47.
    2. Making the Invisible Visible: Portraits of Desire and Constructions of Death in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century China, by Judith Zeitlin, 48–79.
    3. A Soprano Subjectivity: Vocality, Power, and the Compositional Voice of Francesca Caccini, by Suzanne G. Cusick, 80–98.
II. Law and Criminality
    4. Witch Hunting as Woman Hunting: Persecution by Gender, by Anne Llewellwyn Barstow, 129–39.
III. Travel and Settlement
    5. Navigating the Waves (of Devotion): Toward a Gendered Analysis of Early Modern Catholicism, by Jodi Bilinkoff, 161–72.
    6. Sor Juana’s Arch: Public Spectacle, Private Battle, by Electa Arenal, 173–94.
IV. Keynote Address
    7. Armchair Travel, by Karen Newman, 211–25.
V. Pedagogy
    8. Whose Voice Is It Anyway? Teaching Early Women Writers, by Barbara F. McManus, 227–40.
    9. “If we can’t know what ‘really’ happened, why should we study the past?”, by Frances E. Dolan, 241–51.
    10.

Directly from the Sources: Teaching Early Modern Women’s History without the Narrative, by Martha. Howell, 252–62.

VI. Performance
    11. (En)Gendering Performance: Staging Plays by Early Modern Women, by Alison Findlay, Stephanie-Hodgson Wright, and Gweno Williams, 289–308.

 

Culture and Change: Attending to Early Modern Women. Ed. Margaret Mikesell and Adele Seeff. Cranbury, NJ: Associated University Presses, 2003.

 

Introduction, by Margaret Mikesell, 11–39.

I. Stories
    1. “And Then She Fell on a Great Laughter”: Tudor Diplomats Read Marguerite de Navarre, by Anne Lake Prescott, 41–65.
    2. Of Bears, Satyrs, and Diana’s Kisses: Metamorphoses in Early Modern Opera, by Wendy Heller, 66–97.
    3. Just Stories: Telling Tales of Infant Death in Early Modern England, by Garthine Walker, 98–115.
II. Keynote Address
    4. Losing Babies, Losing Stories: Attending to Women’s Confessions in Scottish Witch-trials, by Diane Purkiss, 143–59.
III. Goods
    5. The Evidence of Fiction: Women’s Relationship to Goods in London City Drama, by Jean E. Howard, 161–76.
    6. The Bride and Her Donora in Renaissance Florence, by Jacqueline Marie Musacchio, 177–202.
IV. Faiths
    7. Jewish Women’s Piety and the Impact of Printing in Early Modern Europe, by Judith R. Baskin, 221–40.
    8. Discerning Spirits: Women and Spiritual Authority in Counter-Reformation France, by Barbara B. Diefendorf, 241–65.
    9. “The World reprov’d”: Writing Faith and History in England, by Elaine V. Beilin, 266–80.
V. Pedagogies
    10. “I’ve Never Been This Serious”: Necrophilia and the Teacher of Early Modern Literature, by Sara Jayne Steen, 303–16.
    11. Bodies and Stories, by Laura Gowing, 317–32.
    12. The Subject of “Woman” and the Discipline of Early Modern Studies: Jemima Wilkinson and the Publick Universal Friend, by Karen-edis Barzman, 333–60.
VI. Applications
    13. Elite Fabrications: Staging Seventeenth-Century Drama by Women, by Alison Findlay, Stephanie Hodgson-Wright, and Gweno Williams, 375–77.
    14. The Study of Early Modern Women and the World Wide Web: A University of Maryland Database, by Louise Green, Patricia Herron, Eric N. Lindquist, Yelena Yuckert, Judy Markowitz, Alan Mattlage, and Susanna Van Sant,with Marian Burright and Scott Burright, 378–80.

 

Culture and Control in Counter-Reformation Spain. Ed. Anne J. Cruz and Mary Elizabeth Perry. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1992.

   

Introduction, by Anne J. Cruz and Mary Elizabeth Perry, ix.

    1. “Christianization” in New Castile: Catechism, Communion, Mass, and Confirmation in the Toledo Archbishopric, 1540–1650, by Jean Pierre Dedieu, 1–24.
    2. A Saint for All Seasons: The Cult of San Julián, by Sara T. Nalle, 25–50.
    3. Religious Oratory in a Culture of Control, by Gwendolyn Barnes-Karol, 51–77.
    4. The Moriscos and Circumcision, by Culture and Control in Counter-Reformation Spain, by Bernard Vincent, 78–92.
    5. Aldermen and Judaizers: Cryptojudaism, Counter-Reformation, and Local Power, by Jaime Contreras, 93–123.
    6. Magdalens and Jezebels in Counter-Reformation Spain, by Mary Elizabeth Perry, 124–44.
    7.

La bella malmaridada: Lessons for the Good Wife, by Anne J. Cruz, 145–70.

    8. Saint Teresa, Demonologist, by Alison Weber, 171–95.
    9. Woman as the Source of “Evil” in Counter-Reformation Spain, by María Helena Sánchez Ortega, 196–215.
    10.

On the Concept of the Spanish Literary Baroque, by John R. Beverley, 216–30.

   

Afterword: The Subject of Control, by Anthony J. Cascardi, 231–54.

 

Debating Gender in Early Modern England, 1500–1700. Ed. Cristina Malcolmson and Mihoko Suzuki. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002.

 

Introduction, by Cristina Malcolmson and Mihoko Suzuki, 1–13.

I. Manuscript and Debate
    1. Christine de Pizan’s City of Ladies in Early Modern England, by Cristina Malcolmson, 15–36.
    2. Anne Southwell and the Pamphlet Debate: The Politics of Gender, Class, and Manuscript, by Elizabeth Clarke, 37–55.
II. Print, Pedagogy, and the Question of Class
    3. Muzzling the Competition: Rachel Speght and the Economics of Print, by Lisa J. Schnell, 57–78.
    4. Women's Popular Culture? Teaching the Swetnam Controversy, by Melinda J. Gough, 79–101.
III. Women's Subjectivity in Male-Authored Texts
    5. The Broadside Ballad and the Woman's Voice, by Sandra Clark, 103–20.
    6. “Weele have a Wench shall be our Poet”: Samuel Rowlands’ Gossip Pamphlets, by Susan Gushee O'Malley, 121–39.
IV.

Generic Departures: Figuring the Maternal Body, Constructing Female Culture

    7. The Mat(t)er of Death: The Defense of Eve and the Female Ars Moriendi, by Patricia Phillippy, 141–60.
    8. “Hens should be served first”: Prioritizing Maternal Production in the Early Modern Pamphlet Debate, by Naomi J. Miller, 161–84.
    9. Cross-Dressed Women and Natural Mothers: “Boundary Panic” in Hic Mulier, by Rachel Trubowitz, 185–207.
V. Politics, State, and Nation
    10.

Monstrous Births and the Body Politic: Women’s Political Writings and the Strange and Wonderful Travails of Mistris Parliament and Mistris Rump, by Katherine Romack, 209–30.

    11. Elizabeth, Gender, and the Political Imaginary of Seventeenth-Century England, by Mihoko Suzuki, 231–53.

Dissing Elizabeth: Negative Representations of Gloriana. Ed. Julia M. Walker. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1998.

    Introduction: The Dark Side of the Cult of Elizabeth, by Julia M. Walker, 1–7.
I. History and Policy
    1. The Bad Seed: Princess Elizabeth and the Seymour Incident, by Sheila Cavanagh, 9–29.
    2. Why Did Elizabeth Not Marry? by Susan Doran, 30–59.
    3. The Royal Image in Elizabeth Ireland, by Christopher Highley, 60–76.
    4. “We shall never have a merry world while the Queene lyveth”: Gender, Monarchy, and the Power of Seditious Words, by Carole Levin, 77–97.
II. Pamphlets and Sermons
    5. “Soueraigne Lord of lordly Lady of this land,” by Elizabeth, Stubbs,
    6. The Gaping Gulf, by Ilona Bell, 99–117.
    7. Out of Egypt: Richard Fletcher's Sermon before Elizabeth I after the Execution of Mary Queen of Scots, by Peter E. McCullough, 118–51.
III. The Power of the Poets
    8. “The Image of this Queene so quaynt”: The Pornographic Blazon 1588–1603, by Hannah Betts, 153–84.
    9. Queen Elizabeth Compiled: Henry Stanford's Private Anthology and the Question of Accountability, by Marcy L. North, 185–208.
    10. “Not as women wonted be”: Spenser's Amazon Queen, by Mary Villeponteaux, 209–27.
IV. The Image of the Queen
    11. Fair Is Fowle: Interpreting Anti-Elizabethan Composite Portraiture, by Rob Content, 229–51.
    12. Bones of Contention: Posthumous Images of Elizabeth and Stuart Politics, by Julia M. Walker, 252–76.

 

Early Modern Women and Transnational Communities of Letters. Ed. Julie D. Campbell and Anne R. Larsen. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2009.

I. Continental Epistolary Communities
    1. Letters Make the Family: Nassau Family Correspondence at the Turn of the Seventeenth Century, by Susan Broomhall, 25–44
    2. Letters and Lace: Arcangela Tarabotti and Convent Culture in Seicento Venice, by Meredith K. Ray, 45–73
    3. Women, Letters, and Heresy in Sixteenth-Century Italy: Giulia Gonzaga’s Heterodox Epistolary Network, by Camilla Russell, 75–93
II. Cross-Channel Textual Communities and Uses of Print
    4. The Gender of the Book: Jeanne de Marnef Edits Pernette du Guillet, by Leah Chang, 97-120
    5. “Some Improvement to their Spiritual and Eternal State”: Women’s Prayers in the Seventeenth-Century Church of England, by Sharon L. Arnoult, 121-36
    6. The Public Life of Anne Vaughan Lock: Her Reception in England and Scotland, by Susan M. Felch, 137–58
    7. Esther Inglis: Linguist, Calligrapher, Miniaturist, and Christian Humanist, by Sarah Gwyneth Ross, 160–82
    8. Courtliness, Piety, and Politics: Emblem Books by Georgette de Montenay, by Anna Roemers Visscher, and Esther Inglis , 183–210
III. Constructions of Transnational Literary Circles
    9. Crossing International Borders: Tutors and the Transmission of Young Women’s Writing, by Julie D. Campbell, 213–28
    10. Journeying Across Borders: Catherine des Roches’s Catalog of Modern Women Intellectuals, by Anne R. Larsen, 229–49
    11 Forming familles d’alliance: Intellectual Kinship in the Republic of Letters, by Carol Pal, 251–80
   

Afterword: Critical Distance, by Margaret J. M. Ezell, 281–87

 

Early Modern Women’s Manuscript Writing: Selected Papers from the Trinity/Trent Colloquium. Ed. Victoria E. Burke and Jonathan Gibson. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2004.

    1. Desiring Women Writing’: Female Voices and Courtly ‘Balets’:in some Early Tudor Manuscript Albums, by Elizabeth Heale, 9–32.
    2. Katherine Parr, Princess Elizabeth, and the Crucified Christ,” by Jonathan Gibson, 33–50.
    3. Mildred Cecil, Lady Burleigh: Poetry, Politics, and Protestantism, by Jane Stevenson, 51–74.
    4. Reading Friends: Women’s Participation in ‘Masculine’ Literary Culture, by Victoria Burke, 75–90.
    5. Caitlín Dubh’s Keens: Literary Negotiations in Early Modern Ireland, by Marie-Louise Coolahan, 91–110.
    6. Lady Anne Southwell’s Indictment of Adam, by Erica Longfellow, 111–34.
    7. Reading Bells and Loose Papers: Reading and Writing Practices of the English Benedictine Nuns of Cambrai and Paris, by Heather Wolf, 135–56.
    8. The Notebooks of Rachel Fane: Education for Authorship? by Carolyn Bowden, 157–80.
    9. ‘And Trophes of his praises make’: Providence and Poetry in Katherine Austen’s Book M, 1664–1668, by Sarah Ross, 181–204.
    10. The Books, Manuscripts, and Literary Patronage of Mrs. Anne Sadleir, (1585–1670), by Arnold Hunt, 205–36.
    11. Perfecting Practice? Women, Manuscript Recipes and Knowledge in Early Modern England, by Sara Pennell, 237–58.
    12. ‘Often to my Self I make my mone’: Early Modern Women’s Poetry From the Fielding Family, by Alison Shell, 259–77.

 

Early Women Writers: 1600–1720. Ed. Anita Pacheco. New York and London: Longman, 1998.

   

Introduction

     

Anglo-American vs. French Feminism, 1–6.

     

Materialist feminism and the New Literary History, 6–8.

     

Self-Representations , 8–11.

     

Proto-feminism and the Female Subject, 11–14.

     

Gender/genre/representations, 14–17.

     

Gender and Race, 17–19.

     

Notes, 19–22.

I. Lady Mary Wroth c.. 1587–1653)
    1. “Shall I turne blabb?”: Circulation, Gender, and Subjectivity in Mary Wroth's Sonnets', by Jeff Masten, 25–44.
    2. “Yet Tell Me Some Such Fiction”: Lady Mary Wroth’s Urania and the ‘Femininity’ of Romance' by Helen Hackett, 45–69.
II. Katherine Philips (1632–1634)
    3. Orinda and Female Intimacy, by Elaine Hobby, 73–88.
    4. Excusing the Breach of Nature’s Laws: The Discourse of Denial and Disguise in Katherine Philips’ Friendship Poetry, by Celia A. Easton, 89–107.
III.

Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle (1623–1673)

    5. “The Ragged Rout of Self”: Margaret Cavendish’s True Relation and the Heroics of Self-Disclosure, by Sidonie Smith, 111–32.
    6. Embracing the Absolute: Margaret Cavendish and the Politics of the Female Subject in Seventeenth-Century England, by Catherine Gallagher, 133–45.
IV. Aphra Behn (1640–1689)
    7. “Once a Whore and Ever”? Whore and Virgin in The Rover and its Antecedents, by Nancy Copeland, 149–59.
    8. Gestus” and Signature in Aphra Behn’s The Rover, by Elin Diamond, 160–82.
    9. Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko and Women’s Literary Authority, by Jane Spencer, 183–96.
    10. The Romance of Empire: Oroonoko and the Trade in Slaves, by Laura Brown, 197–221.
V. Anne Finch, Countess of Winchilsea (1661–1720)
    11.

An Augustan Woman Poet, by Katherine Rogers, 225–41.

    12. Anne Finch Placed and Displaced, by Ruth Salvaggio, 242–65.

 

Elizabeth I: Always Her Own Free Woman. Ed. Carole Levin, Jo Eldridge Carney, and Debra Barrett-Graves. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2003.

   

Introduction, by Carole Levin, Jo Eldridge Carney, and Debra Barrett-Graves, 1–6.

I. Elizabeth and a Problematic Court
    1. Queen and Country?: Female Monarchs and Feminized Nations in Elizabethan Political Pamphlets, by Jacqueline Vanhoutte, 7–19
    2. Robert Sidney, the Dudleys, and Queen Elizabeth, by Michael G. Brennan, Noel J. Kinnamon, and Margaret P. Hannay, 20–42.
    3. ‘Highly touched in honour’: Elizabeth I and the Alençon Controversy, by Debra Barrett-Graves, 43–60
II. Elizabeth Moves Through Her Kingdom
    4. Religious Conformity and the Progresses of Elizabeth I, by Mary Hill Cole, 63–77
    5.

Turning Religious Authority into Royal Supremacy: Elizabeth I’s Learned Persona and Her University Orations, by Linda Shenk, 78–96.

    6. The Fairy Queen Figure in Elizabethan Entertainments, by Matthew Woodcock, 97–116.
III. Looking at Elizabeth Through Another Lens
    7. ‘A poore shepherd and his sling’: A Biblical Model for a Renaissance Queen, by Michele Osherow, 119–30.
    8. ‘Ceste Nouvelle Papesse’: Elizabeth I and the Specter of Pope Joan, by Craig Rustici, 131–48.
    9. Queen to Queen at Check: Grace O’Malley, Elizabeth Tudor, and the Discourse of Majesty in the State Papers of Ireland, by Brandie R. Siegfried, 149–76.
IV. Elizabeth Then and Now
    10.

Elizabeth and the Politics of Elizabethan Courtship, by Ilona Bell, 179–91.

    11. Popular Perceptions of Elizabeth, 192–214.
    12. Young Elizabeth in Peril: from Seventeenth-century Drama to Modern Movies, by Carole Levine and Jo Eldridge Carney, 215–37.
   

Afterword, by Janel Mueller

 

Elizabeth I: Then and Now. Ed. Georgianna Ziegler. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2003.

   

Introduction to the Life and Reign of Elizabeth I, by Carole Levin, 14–19.

   

Queen Elizabeth’s Books, by Heidi Brayman Hackel, 20–29.

   

Catalogue, by Georgianna Ziegler, 30–147.

   

Essays

    1. Surveying Scholarly Treasures: Folger Manuscripts by and about Elizabeth I, by Janel Mueller, 148–60.
    2. Chronological List of manuscripts at the Folger Library signed by Elizabeth I, by Heather Wolfe, 161–63.
    3. Portraying Queens: The International Language of Court Portraiture in the Sixteenth Century, by Sheila ffolliott, 164–75.
    4. Re-inventing Elizabeth I: Memories, Counter-memories, Histories, by Barbara Hodgdon, 176–83.

Engendering the Early Modern Stage: Women Playwrights in the Spanish Empire
. Ed. Valeria Hegstrom and Amy R. Williamsen. New Orleans: University Press of the South, 1999.
      Loa: Chartering One’s Course: Gender, the Canon and Early Modern Theater, by Amy R. Williamsen, 1–17.
  Act I.   Ana Caro: Setting the Stage
    1. Women Directing Women: Ana Caro’s Valor, agravio y mujer as Performance Text, by Barbara Mujica, 19–50.
    2. Ana Caro’s Partinuplés and the Chivalric Tradition, by Judith A. Whitenack, 51–74.
    3. Mirrors and Matriline: (In)visibilities in Ana Caro’s El conde Partinuplés, by Frederick A. de Armas, 75–92.
    4. Repetitive Patterns: Marrying Off the “Parthenos” in Ana Caro’s El conde Partinuplés, by Teresa S. Soufas, 93–106.
    5. Entremés I: Women and Secular Theater, by Valerie Hegstrom, 107–19.
  Act II:   Dramatizing Damas: Enter Stage Left
    6. Hysterical Mimicry andPerversion in María de Zayas’s La traición en la amistad: An example of a “Hermeneutics of Suspicion”, by Laura Gorfkle, 121–38.
    7.  The Use of Mythology in Feliciana Enríquez de Guzmán’s Tragicomedia de los jardines, y campos sabeos, by Ted E. McVay, Jr., 139–50.
    8. “Tierra de en medio”: Liminalities in Angela de Azevedo’s El muerto disimulado, by Anita Stoll, 151–65.
    9. Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Armesinda Sets Her Own Parameters in La firmeza en la ausencia, by Leonor de la Cueva y Silva, by Linda L. Elman, 165–88.
    10. Leonor de la Cueya Rewrites Lope de Vega: Subverting the Silence in La firmeza en la ausencia and La corona merecida, by Sharon D. Voros, 189–210.
    11.

Entremés II: Theater in the Convent, by Valerie Hegstrom, 211–20.

   Act III:  Staging Sisterhood: Play Rites Intra/Extramuros
    12. Not only her Father’s Daughter: Sor Marcela de San Félix, by Susan M. Smith, 239–56.
    13. Music and Theater in Colonial Mexico, by Pamela H. Long, 257–70.
    14. Theatricality in the Villancicos of Sor Juana de la Cruz, by Merlin H. Forster, 271–84.
    15. Mimesis and Sacrifice: Girardian Theory and Women’s Comedias, by Christopher B. Weimar, 285–316.
    16. Sarao, Dancing to be Done, by Valerie Hegstrom and Amy R. Williamsen, 317–18.
  Appendix I: Women Dramatists and Their Plays, 319–24.
  Appendix II: Critical Studies of Women Dramatists and Their Works, 325–

The Expanding Discourse: Feminism and Art History
. Ed. Norma Broude and Mary D. Garrard. New York: Harper Collins, 1992.
[chapters 1-7 focus on the early modern period.]
    1. The Virgin’s One Bare Breast: Nudity, Gender, and Religious Meaning in Tuscan Early Renaissance Culture, by Margaret R. Miles, 27–38.
    2. Women in Frames: The Gaze, the Eye, the Profile in Renaissance Portraiture, by Patricia Simon, 39–58.
    3. Leonardo da Vinci: Female Portraits, Female Nature, by Mary D. Garrard, 59–86.
    4. The Taming of the Blue: Writing out Color in Italian Renaissance Theory, by Patricia L. Reilly, 87–100.
    5.  A Lesson for the Bride: Botticelli’s Primavera, by Lilian Zirpolo, 101–10.
    6. Titian’s Sacred and Profane Love and Marriage, by Rona Goffen, 111–26.
    7. The Loggia dei Lanzi: A Showcase of Female Subjugation, by Yael Even, 127–38.

The Family in Early Modern England
. Ed. Helen Berry and Elizabeth Foyster. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007
.
    1. Introduction, by Helen Berry and Elizabeth Foyster, 1–17.
    2. Marriage, Separation, and the Common Law in England, 1540–1660, by Tim Stretton, 18–39.
    3. Republican Reformation: Family, Community, and the State in Interregnum Middlesex, 1649–60, by Bernard Capp, 40–66.
    4. Keeping it in the Family: Crime and the Early Modern Household, by Garthine Walker, 67–95.
    5.  Faces in the Crowd: Gender and Age in the Early Modern English Crowd, by John Walter, 96–125.
    6. “Without the Cry of any Neighbors”: The Cumbrian family and the poor Law Authorities, c. 1690–1730, by Steve Hindle, 126–57.
    7. Childless Men in Early Modern England, by Helen Berry and Elizabeth Foyster, 158–83.
    8. Aristocratic Women and Ideas of Family in the Early Eighteenth Century, by Ingrid Tague, 184–208.
    9. Reassessing Parenting in Eighteenth-Century England, by Joanne Bailey, 209–32.

Female Monasticism in Early Modern Europe, an Interdisciplinary View: Catholic Christendom 1300–1700
. Ed. Cordula van Wyhe. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2008.
    Introduction, by Cordula van Wyhe, 1–9
I:

Femininity and Sanctity

    1. Nuns and Relics: Spiritual Authority in Post-Tridentine Naples, by Helen Hills, 11–38.
    2. Clara Hortulana of Embach or How to Suffer Martyrdom in the Cloister, by Ulrike Strasser, 39–58.
    3. How to Look Like a (Female) Saint: The Early Iconography of St. Teresa of Avila, by Margit Thøfner, 59–78.
II. Convent Theatre and Music Making
    4. Music and Misgiving: Attitudes towards Nuns’ Music in Early Modern Spain, by Colleen Baade, 81–96.
    5. Traditions and Priorities in Claudia Rusca’s Motet Book, by Robert L.Kendrick, 97–124
    6. The Wise and Foolish Virgins in Tuscan Convent Theatre, by Elissa B. Weaver, 125–42.
III. Spiritual Directorship
    7. Soul Mates: Spiritual Friendship and Life Writing in Early Modern Spain (and Beyond), by Jodi Bilinkof, 143–54.
    8. Barbe Acarie and Her Spiritual Daughters: Women’s Spiritual Authority in Seventeenth-Century France, by Barbara B. Diefendorf, 155–72.
    9. The Idea Vitae Teresianae (1687): The Teresian Mystical Life and its Visual Representation in the Low Countries, by Cordula van Wyhe, 173–210.
IV. Community and Conflict
    10. ‘Little Angels’: Young Girls in Discalced Carmelite Convents (1562–1582), by Alison Weber, 211–26.
    11. Securing Souls or Telling Tales? The Politics of Cloistered Life in an English Convent, by Claire Walker, 227–44.
    12. Writing the Thirty Years’ War: Convent Histories by Maria Anna Junius and Elisabeth Herald, by Charlotte Woodford, 245–59.

Female Scholars: A Tradition of Learned Women before 1800
. Ed. Jean R. Brink. Montréal, Canada: Eden Press Women’s Publications, 1980.
    Introduction, by Jean R. Brink, 1–6.
    1. Christine de Pisan: First Professional Woman of Letters (French, 1364–1430?), by Leslie Altman, 7–23.
    2. Caterina Corner, Queen of Cyprus (Venetian, 1454?–1510), by Louise Buenger Robbert, 24–35.
    3. Marguerite de Navarre and Her Circle (French, 1492–1549), by C. J. Blaisdell, 36–53.
    4. María de Zayas y Sotomayor: Sibyl of Madrid (Spanish, 1590?–1661?), by Sandra M. Foa, 54–67.
    5. Anna Maria van Schurman: The Star of Utrecht (Dutch, 1607–1678), by Joyce L. Irwin, 68–85.
    6. Bathsua Makin: Educator and Linguist (English, 1608?–1675?), by Jean R. Brink, 86–100.
    7. Madame de Sévigné: Chronicler of an Age (French, 1626–1696), by Jeanne a Ojala, 101–18.
    8. Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz: Mexico’s Tenth Muse (Mexican, 1651–1695), by Gerard Flynn, 119–36.
    9. Elizabeth Elstob: The Saxon Nymph (English, 1683–1765), by Mary Elizabeth Green, 137–60.
    10. Mercy Otis Warren: Playwright, Poet, and Historian of the American Revolution (American, 1728–1814), by Joan Hoff Wilson and Sharon L. Bollinger, 161–82.

Feminism and Renaissance Studies
. Ed. Lorna Hutson. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.
    Introduction, by Lorna Hutson, 1-19.
I.  Humanism after Feminism
    1. Did Women Have a Renaissance? by Joan Kelly, 21-47.
    2. Women Humanists: Education for What? by Lisa Jardine,48–81.
    3. The Housewife and the Humanists, by Lorna Hutson, 82–105.
    4. The Tenth Muse: Gender, Rationality, and the Marketing of Knowledge, by Stephanie Jed, 106–125.
II. Historicizing Femininity
    5. The Notion of Woman in Medicine, Anatomy, and Physiology, by Ian MacLean, 127–55.
    6. Women on Top, by Natalie Zemon Davis, 156–85.
    7. The “Cruel Mother”: Maternity, Widowhood, and Dowry in Florence in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries, by Christiane Klapisch-Zuber, 186–202.
    8. Witchcraft and Fantasy in Early Modern Germany, by Lyndal Roper, 203–231.
III. Gender and Genre
    9. Diana Described: Scattered Woman and Scattered Rhyme, by Nancy J. Vickers, 233–48.
    10.  Literary Fat Ladies and the Generation of the Text, by Patricia Parker, 249–85.
    11. Margaret Cavendish and the Romance of Contract, by Victoria Kahn, 286–316.
    12. Surprising Fame: Renaissance Gender Ideologies and Women’s Lyric, by Ann Rosalind Jones, 317–337.
IV.  Women's Agency
    13. Women on Top in the Pamphlet Literature of the English Revolution, by Sharon Achinstein, 339–72.
    14. La Donnesca Mano, by Fredrika Jacobs, 373–411.
    15. Guilds, Male Bonding and Women's Work in Early Modern Germany, by Merry Wiesner, 412–27.
    16. Language, Power, and the Law: Women's Slander Litigation in Early Modern London, by Laura Gowing, 428–49.
    17. Finding a Voice: Vittoria Archilei and the Florentine “New Music”, by Tim Carter, 450–67.

Feminist Interventions in Early American Studies. Ed. Mary C. Carruth. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2006.
    Introduction, by Mary C. Carruth, xiii
I. Theoretical Interventions
    1.

Feminist Theories and Early American Studies, by Sharon M. Harris, 3–12.    

II. Transnational Art by Women Poets and Painters
    2.

 “My Goods Are True”: Tenth Muses in the New World Market, by Tamara Harvey, 13–26.

    3. Self-Fashioning Through Self-Portraiture in Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, by Margo Echenberg, 27–43.
III. Re-Visions of God and Country: Women’s Religious Practices
    4.

“Keepers of the Covenant”: Submissive Captives and Maternal Redeemers in Colonial New England, 1660–1680, by Sarah Rivett, 45–59.   

    5. Between Abjection and Redemption: Mary Rowlandson’s Subversive Corporeality, by Mary C. Carruth, 60–79.
    6. “varied trials, dippings, and strippings”: Quaker Women’s Irresistible call to the Early South, by Michele Lise Tarter, 80–95.
IV. Gender and Race in Early American Culture and Literature
    7.

Of Harlots and Hags: Feminine Embodiments of Early American Whiteness, by Valerie Babb, 97–111. 

    8. Imagining Mary Musgrove: “Georgia’s Creek Indian Princess” and Southern Identity, by Angela Pulley Hudson, 112–25.
    9. Imaginative Conjunctions on the Imperial “Frontier”: Catharine Sedgwick Reads Mungo Park, by Ivy Schweitzer, 126–46.
V. Gender Trouble in the American Revolution
    10.

Elegiac Patriarchs: Crévecoeur and the War of Masculinities, by Anne G. Myles, 147–60.

    11. Phillis Wheatley and the Black American Revolution, by Betsy Erkkila, 161–82.
    12. An Actor in the Drama of Revolution: Deborah Sampson, Print, and Performance in the Creation of Celebrity, by Karen A. Weyler, 183–96.
VI. Revolution from Within: Judith Sargent Murray
    13.

 Judith Sargent Murray’s Medium between Calculation and Feeling, by Jennifer J. Baker, 210–25.

VII. Gender Performances in Early National Literature
    15. “Daughters of America,” Slaves in Algiers: Activism and Abnegation off Rowson’s Barbary Coast, by Marion Rust, 227–39.
    16. Columbia’s Daughters in Drag; or, Cross-Dressing, Collaboration, and Authorship in Early American Novels, by Lisa M. Logan, 240–52.
    17. Inscribing Manhood and Enacting Womanhood in the Early Republic, by Angela Vietto, 253–65.
       
Feminist Perspectives on Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. Ed. Stephanie Merrim. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1991.
    1. Toward a Feminist Reading of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz: Past, Present, and Future Directions in Sor Juana Criticism, by Stephanie Merrim, 11–37.
    2. Some Obscure Points in the Life of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, by Dorothy Schons, 38–60.
    3. Unlike Sor Juana? The Model Nun in the Religious Literature of Colonial Mexico, by Asunción Lavrin, 61–85.
    4. Tricks of the Weak, by Josefina Ludmer, 86–93.
    5. Mores Geometricae: The “Womanscript” in the Theater of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, 94–123.
    6. Where Woman is the Creator of the Wor[l]d: Or, Sor Juana’s Discourses on Method, by Electa Arenal, 124–41.
    7. A Feminist Rereading of Sor Juana’s Dream, by Georgina Sabat-Rivers, 142–61.
    8. Speaking Through the Voices of Love: Interpretation as Emancipation, by Ester Gimbernat de González, 162–76
    Bibliographical Note, by Stephanie Merrim, 177–80.
    Chronology of SorJuana Inés de la Cruz, by Victoria Pehl Smith, 181–82.
       
Fetter’d or Free? British Women Novelists, 1670–1815. Ed. Mary Anne Schofield and Cecilia Macheski. Athens: Ohio University Press, 1986.
    Introduction, 1–5.
I.

Gender and Genre

    1. A Woman’s Portion: Jane Austen and the Female Character, by Linda C. Hunt, 8–28.
    2. Fanny Burney’s “Feminism”: Gender or Genre?, by Martha G. Brown, 29–39.
    3. Men, Women, and Money: The Case of Mary Brunton, by Sarah W. R. Smith, 40–58.
II. Feminine Iconography
    4. “At the Crossroads”: Sister Authors and the Sister Arts, by Katrin R. Burlin, 60–84.
    5. Penelope’s Daughters: Images of Needlework in Eighteenth-Century Literature, by Cecilia Macheski, 85–100.
    6. Placing the Female: The Metonymic Garden in Amatroy and Pious Narrative, 1700–1740, by April London, 101–23.
    7. Radcliffe’s Dual Modes of Visions, by Rhoda L. Flaxman, 124–33
III. Love, Sex, and Marriage
    8. Sisters, by Patricia Meyer Spacks, 136–51.
    9. “I Died for Love”: Esteem in Eighteenth-Century Novels by Women, by Paul R. Backscheider, 152–68.
    10. Matrimonial Discord in Fiction and in the Court: The Case of Ann Masterman, by Susan Stavers, 169–85.
    11. “Descending Angels”: Salubrious Sluts and Pretty Prostitutes in Haywood’s Fiction, by Mary Anne Schofield, 186–200.
    12. The Old Maid, or “to grow old, and be poor, and laughed at”, by Jean B. Kern 201–14.
IV. Moral and Political Revolution
    13. Politics and Moral Idealism: The Achievement of Some Early Women Novelists, by Jerry C. Beasley, 216–36.
    14. Charlotte Smith’s Desmond: The Epistolary Novel as Ideological Argument, by Diana Bowstead, 237–63.
    15 Hannah More’s Tracts for the Times: Social Fiction and Female Ideology, by Mitzi Myers, 264–84.
    16. Jane Austen and the English Novel of the 1790s, by Gary Kelly, 285–306.
V. Fictional Strategies
    17. Springing the Trap: Subtexts and Subversions, by Deborah Downs-Miers, 308–23.
    18. Frances Sheridan: Morality and Annihilated Time, by Margaret Anne Doody, 324–58.
    19. A Near-Miss on the Psychological Novel: Maria Edgeworth’s Harrington, 359–69
VI. The Novel and Beyond: Critical Assessments
    20. Aphra Behn and the Works of the Intellect, by Robert Adams Day, 372–82.
    21. “Ladies. . .Taking the Pen in Hand”: Mrs. Barbauld’s Criticism of Eighteenth-Century Women Novelists, by Catherine E. Moore, 383–97.
    22. The Modern Reader and the “Truly Feminine Novel” 1650–1815: A Critical Reading List, by Roger D. Lund, 398–425.
    Afterword: Jane Austen Looks Ahead, by Irene Taylor, 426–33.
       

 Framing the Family: Narrative and Representation in the Medieval and Early Modern Periods. Ed. Rosalynn Voaden and Diane Wolfthal. Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 280. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005.

Introduction, by Diane Wolfthal, 1–16.

I.          Home Sweet Home

1.         Fathers and Daughters in Holbein’s Sketch of Thomas More’s Family, by Felicity Riddy, 19–38.

2.         Domestic Rhetors of an Early Modern Family: Female Persuasions in A Woman Killed with Kindness, by Carol Mejia-LaPerle, 39–55.

II.        The Marital Bed

3.         Purgatory in the Marriage Bed: Conjugal Sodomy in The Gast of Gy, by Robert S. Sturges, 57–78.

4.         The Leper in the Master Bedroom: Thinking Through a Thirteenth-Century Exemplum, by Sharon Farmer, 79–100.

5.         A Marriage Made for Heaven: The Vies Occitanes of Elzear of Sabran and Delphine of Puimichel, by Rosalynn Voaden, 101–17.

III.       Career and Family

6.         Power couples and women writers in Elizabethan England: the public voices of Dorcas and Richard Martin and Anne and Hugh Dowriche, by Micheline White, 119–38.

7.         An Intimate Look at Baroque Women Artists: Births, Babies, and Biography, by Frima Fox Hofrichter, 139–59.

IV.       Model Parents

8.         Constructing the Patriarchal Parent: Fragments of the Biography of Joseph the Carpenter, by Pamela Sheingorn, 161–80.

9.         Fatherhood, Citizenship, and Children’s Games in Fifteenth-Century Florence, by Juliann Vitullo, 181–92.

10.       In the Belly, in the Bower: Divine Maternal Practice in Patience, by Karen Bollermann, 193–219.

V.        Family and Memory

11.       Reframing Gender in Medieval Jewish Images of Circumcision, by Eva Frojmovic, 221–44.

12.       Marriage and Memory: Images of Marriage Rituals in Early Yiddish Books of Customs, by Diane Wolfthal, 245–72.

13.       Constructing Family Memory: Three English Funeral Monuments of the Early Modern Period, by Bryan Curd, 273–92.

Gender and Society in Renaissance Italy. Ed. Judith C. Brown and Robert C. Davis. London: Addison-Wesley Longman, 1998.

Introduction, by Judith C. Brown, 1–15.

I.          The Gendered City in Renaissance Italy, 17–18

1.         The Geography of Gender in the Renaissance, by Robert C. Davis, 19–38.

2.         Gender and the Rites of Honor in Italian Renaissance Cities, by Sharon T. Strocchia, 39–60.

II.        The Social Foundations of Gender, 61–62

3.         Daughters and Oligarchs: Gender and the Early Renaissance State, by Stanley Chojnacki, 63–86.

4.         Person and Gender in the Laws, by Thomas Kuehn, 87–106.

5.         Women and Work in Renaissance Italy, by Samuel K. Cohn, Jr., 107–26.

III.       The Social Body, 127–28.

6.         Medicine and Magic: The Healing Arts, by Katherine Park, 129–49.

7.         Gender and Sexual Culture in Renaissance Italy, by Michael Rocke, 150–70.

IV.       The Renaissance of the Spirit, 171–72

8.         Spiritual Kinship and Domestic Devotions, by Daniel Bornstein, 173–92.

9.         Gender, Religious Institutions and Social Discipline: The Reform of the Regulars, by Gabriella Zarri, 193–212.

10.       Gender, Religious Representation and Cultural Production in Early Modern Italy, by Karen-edis Barzman, 214–33.

Suggested Further Readings, by Robert C. Davis, 234–49.

 

Gender in Debate from the Early Middle Ages to the Renaissance. Ed. Thelma S. Fenster and Clark A. Lees. The New Middle Ages. New York: Palgrave, 2002.

Introduction, by Thelma S. Fenster and Clare A. Lees, 1–18

1.         The Clerics and the Critics: Misogyny and the Social Symbolic in Anglo-Saxon England, 19–40

2.         The Undebated Debate: Gender and the Image of God in Medieval Theology, by E. Ann Matter, 41–56.

3.         Refiguring the “Scandalous Excess” of Medieval Woman: The Wife of Bath and Liberality, by Alcuin Blamires, 57–78.

4.         Beyond Debate: Gender in Play in Old French Courtly Fiction, by Roberta A. Krueger, 79–96.

5.         Thinking Through Gender in Late Medieval German Literature, by Ann Marie Rasmussen, 97–112.

6.         The Strains of Defense: The Many Voices in Jean Le Fèvre’s Livre de Leesce, by Karen Pratt, 113–34.

7.         The Freedoms of Fiction for Gender in Premodern France, by Helen Solterer, 135–64.

8.         Debate about Women in Trecento Florence, by Pamela Benson, 165–88.

9.         A Woman’s Place: Visualizing the Feminine Ideal in the Courts and Communes of Renaissance Italy, by Margaret Franklin, 189–206.

10.       “Deceitful Sects”: The Debate about Women in the Age of Isabel the Catholic, by Barbara E. Weissberger, 207–36

11.       _Qué demandamos de las mugeres?”: Forming the Debate about Women in Late Medieval and Early Modern Spain (with a Baroque response), by Julian Weiss, 237–73.

 

Gender in Early Modern German History. Ed. Ulinka Rublack. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.

1.         Meanings of Gender in Early Modern German History, by Ulinka Rublack, 1–19.

I:          Masculinities

2.         What made a man a man? Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Findings, by Heide Wunder, 21–48.

3.         Men in Witchcraft Trials: Towards a Social Anthropology of “Male” Understandings of Magic and Witchcraft, by Eva Labouvie, 49–69.

II:        Transgressions

4.         Monstrous Deception: Midwifery, Fraud, and Gender in Early Modern Rothenburg ob der Tauber, by Alison Rowlands, 71–101.

5.         “Evil Imaginings and Fantasies”: Child-witches and the End of the Witch Craze, by Lyndal Roper, 102–30.

6.         Gender Tales: The Multiple Identities of Maiden Heinrich, Hamburg, 1700, by Mary Lindemann, 131–51.

7.         Disembodied Theory: Discourses of Sex in Early Modern Germany, by Merry E. Wiesner, 152–74.

III:       Politics

8.         Peasant Protest and the Language of Women’s Petitions: Christina Vend’s Supplications of 1629, by Renata Blickle, 177–99.

9.         State-formation, Gender and the Experience of Governance in Early Modern Württemberg, by Ulinka Rublack, 200–218

IV:       Religion

10.       Cloistering Women’s Past: Conflicting Accounts of Enclosure in a Seventeenth-Century Munich Nunnery, by Ulrike Strasser, 221–46

11.       Memory, Religion, and Family in the Writings of Pietist Women, by Ulrike Gleixner, 247–74.

12.       One Body, Two Confessions: Mixed Marriages in Germany, by Dagmer Freist, 275–302.

 

Generation and Degeneration: Tropes of Reproduction in Literature and History from Antiquity through Early Modern Europe. Ed. Valeria Finucci and Kevin Brownlee. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2001.

Introduction:   Genealogical Pleasures, Genealogical Disruptions, by Valeria Finucci, 1–15.

I.          Theories of Reproduction

1.         Generation, Degeneration, Regeneration: Original Sin and the Conception of Jesus in the Polemic between Augustine and Julian of Eclanum, by Elizabeth A. Clark, 17–40.

2.         Maternal Imagination and Monstrous Birth: Tasso’s Gerusalemme liberata, by Valeria Finucci, 41-79.

II.        Boundaries of Sex and Gender

3.         Contradictions of Masculinity: Ascetic Inseminators and Menstruating Men in Greco-Roman Culture, by Dale B. Martin, 81–108.

4.         Menstruating Men: Similarity and Difference of the Sexes in Early Modern Medicine, by Gianna Pomata, 109–52.

5.         The Psychomorphology of the Clitoris, or The Reemergence of the Tribade in English Culture, by Valerie Traub, 153–87.

III.       Female Genealogies

6.         Genealogies in Crisis: María de Zayas in Seventeenth-Century Spain, by Marina Scordilis Brownlee, 189–208.

7.         Incest and Agency: The Case of Elizabeth I, by Maureen Quilligan, 209–33.

IV.       The Politics of Inheritance

8.         In Search of the Origins of Medicine: Egyptian Wisdom and Some Renaissance Physicians, by Nancy G. Siraisi, 235–61.

9.         The Conflicted Genealogy of Cultural Authority: Italian Responses to French Cultural Dominance in Il Tesoretto, Il Fiore, and La Commedia, by Kevin Brownlee, 262–86.

10.       Hauntings: The Materiality of Memory on the Renaissance Stage, by Peter Stallybrass, 287–315.

 

Genre and Women’s Life Writing in Early Modern England. Ed. Michelle M. Dowd and Julie A. Eckerle. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2007.

1.         Introduction, by Michelle M. Dowd and Julie A. Eckerle, 1–13

2.         “Free and Easy as one’s Discourse”?: Genre and Self-Expression in the Poems and Letters of Early Modern Englishwomen, by Helen Wilcox, 15–32.

3.         Domestic Papers: Manuscript Culture and Early Modern Women’s Life Writing, by Margaret J. M. Ezell, 33–48.

4.         “Many hands hands”: Writing the Self in Early Modern Women’s Recipe Books, by Catherine Field, 49–64.

5.         Serial Identity: History, Gender, and Form in the Diary Writing of Lady Anne Clifford, by Megan Matchinske, 65–80.

6.         Merging the Secular and the Spiritual in Lady Anne Halkett’s Memoirs, by Mary Ellen Lamb, 81–96.

7.         Prefacing Texts, Authorizing Authors, and Constructing Selves: The Preface as Autobiographical Space, by Julie A. Eckerle, 97–114.

8.         Structures of Piety In Elizabeth Richardson’s Legacie, by Michelle M. Dowd, 115–30.

9.         Intersubjectivity, Intertextuality, and Form in the Self-Writings of Margaret Cavendish, by Elspeth Graham, 131–50.

10.       Margaret Cavendish’s Domestic Experiment, by Lara Dodds, 151–68.

11.       “That All the World May Know”: Women’s “Defense Narratives” and the Early Novel, by Josephine Donovan, 169–81.

 

Gloriana’s Face: Women, Public and Private, in the English Renaissance. Ed. S. P. Cerasano and Marion Wynne-Davies. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1992.

1.         “From Myself, My Other Self I turned”: An Introduction, by S. P. Cerasano and Marion Wynne-Davies, 1–24.

2.         Penelope and the Politics of Woman’s Place in the Renaissance, by Georgianna Ziegler, 25–46

3.         Private Writing and Public Function: Autobiographical Texts by Renaissance Englishwomen, by Helen Wilcox, 47–62.

4.         Queen Elizabeth in Her Speeches, by Frances Teague, 63–78.

5.         The Queen’s Masque: Renaissance Women and the Seventeenth-Century Court Masque, by Marion Wynne-Davies, 79–104.

6.         “The Chief Knot of All the Discourse”: The Maternal Subtext Tying Sidney’s Arcadia to Shakespeare’s King Lear, by Barbara J. Bono, 105–28.

7.         “Household Kates”: Chez Petruchio, Percy, and Plantaganet, by Laurie E. Maguire, 129–66.

8.         “Half a Dozen Dangerous Words”, by S.P. Cerasano, 167–84.

9.         “Their Testament at Their Apron Strings”: The Representation of Puritan Women in Early-Seventeenth-Century England, by Akiko Kusunoki, 185–204.

10.       “Who May Binde Where God Hath Loosed”: Response to Sectarian Women’s Writing in the Second Half of the Seventeenth Century, by Hilary Hinds, 205–26.

 

Going Public: Women and Publishing in Early Modern France. Ed. Elizabeth C. Goldsmith and Dena Goodman. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1995.

Introduction, by Elizabeth C. Goldsmith and Dena Goodman, 1–9.

I.          Putting Their Case to the Public

1.         “Reason for the Public to Admire Her”: Why Madame de La Guette Published Here Memoirs, by Carolyn Chappell Lougee, 13–29.

2.         Publishing the Lives of Hortense and Marie Mancini, by Elizabeth C. Goldsmith, 31–45.

3.         Parisian Guildswomen and the (Sexual) Politics of Privilege: Defending Their Patrimonies in Print, by Cynthia Maria Truant, 46–61.

4.         Victorious Victims: Women and Publicity in Mémoires Judiciaires, by Nadine Bérenguier, 62–78.

5.         Books and the Birthing Business: The Midwife Manuals of Madame du Coudray, by Nina Rattner Gelbart, 79–96.

II.        Defining the Literary Field

6.         Women’s Letters in the Public Sphere, by Janet Gurkin Altman, 99–115.

7.         The (Literary) World at War, or, What Can Happen When Women Go Public, by Joan DeJean, 116–28.

8.         Les Fées Modernes: Women, Fairy Tales, and the Literary Field in Late Seventeenth-Century France, by Lewis C. Seifert, 129–45.

9.         The Voices of Shadows: Lafayette’s Zaide, by Faith E. Beasley, 146–60.

10.       Making Sex Public: Félicité de Choiseul-Meuse and the Lewd Novel, by Kathryn Norberg, 161–75.

III.       Debating the Question of Women and Publicity

11.       The Salon Woman Goes Public. . .or Does She? By Erica Harth, 179–93.

12.       Publishing without Perishing: Isabelle de Charrière, a.k.a. la mouche de coche, by Susan K. Jackson, 194–209.

13.       Suzanne Necker’s Mélanges: Gender, Writing, andPublicity, by Dona Goodman, 210–23.

14.       Laws of Nature / Rights of Genius: The Drame of Constance of Salm, by Elizabeth Colwill, 224–42.

The Graph of Sex and the German Text: Gendered Culture in Early Modern Germany, 1500–1700. Ed. Lynne Tatlock and Christiane Bohnert. Amsterdam and Atlanta: Rodolpi, 1994. [only essays in English are listed]

Preface, by Lynne Tatlock and Christiane Bohnert, 1–5

I.          The Politics of Gender

2.         Dr. Faustus and Runagate Courage: Theorizing Gender in Early Modern German Literature, by Barbara Becker Cantarino, 27–44.

3.         On Finding Words: Witchcraft and the Discourses of Dissidence and Discovery, by Gerhild Scholz Williams, 45–66.

4.         Invisibility, or the Illusion of Power, by Christiane Bohnert, 67–75.

II.        Early Modern Discourses of Love and Marriage

8.         Gender and its Subversion: Reflections on Literary Ideals of Marriage, by Sigrid Brauner, 179–99.

III.       Women, Power, and Texts

9.         Gender and Power in Early Modern Europe: The Empire Strikes Back, by Merry E. Wiesner, 201–24.

11.       The Quest for Consolation and Amusement: Reading Habits of German Women in the Seventeenth Century, by Cornelius Niekus Moore, 247–68.

12.       Deceitful Symmetry in Gryphius’s Cardenio und Celinda: Or What Rosina Learned at the Theater and Why She Went, by M. R. Sperberg McQueen, 269–95.

IV.       Constructing Sexual Difference

15.       “Sex in Strange Places”: The Split Text of Gender in Lohenstein’s Epicharis (1665), by Jane O. Newman, 349–82.

16.       Ab ovo: Reconceiving the Masculinity of the Autobiographical Subject, by Lynn Tatlock, 383–412.

17.       The Gendered Ape, by Londa Schiebinger, 413–41.

 

Heroic Virtue, Comic Infidelity: Reassessing Marguerite de Navarre’s Heptamèron. Ed. Dora E. Polacheck. Folsom, CA: Hestia Press, 1993.

Introduction

1.         The Heptaméron Then and Now, by Dora E. Polachek, 8–20.

I.          Locua Amoenus: Setting the Stage

2.         Spirit, Body, and Flesh in Marguerite de Navarre’s Heptaméron, by Robert D. Cottrell, 23–37.

3.         La journée des devisants, by Robert Melançon, 38–50.

4.         Sins of the Mother: Adultery, Lineage, and the Law in the Heptaméron, by Judy Kem, 51–59.

II.        Heroic Virtue: Signaling Crisis

5.         Heroic Infidelity: Novella 15, by Patricia Francis Cholakian, 62–76.

6.         Unwriting Lucretia: “Heroic Virtue” in the Heptaméron, by Carla Freccero, 77–89.

7.         “Qui sommes tous cassez du harnoys” or, the Heptaméron and uses of the Male Body, by Jeffery C. Perself, 90–102.

8.         Pour l’amour du frère: l’inceste fraternal dans l’Heptaméron, by François Paré, 103–15.

III.       Engendering Laughter: Men Mocked

9.         Pedestrian Chivalry: Novella 50 and the Unsaddling of Courtly Tradition in the Heptaméron, by Gary Ferguson, 118–31.

10.       The Hand, the Glove, the Finger and the Heart: Comic Infidelity and Substitution in the Heptaméron, by Jerry C. Nash, 142–54.

11.       Save the Last Laugh for Me: Revamping the Script of Infidelity in Novella 69, by Dora E. Polachek, 155–70.

 

“High and Mighty Queens” of Early Modern England: Realities and Representations. Ed. Carole Levin, Debra Barrett Graves, and Jo Eldridge. Carney, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.

Introduction, by Carol Levin, Debra Barrett-Graves, and Jo Eldridge, 1–7.

I.          The Nature of Renaissance Queens

1.         Transformation or Continuity? Sixteenth-century Education and the Legacy of Catherine of Aragon, Mary I, and Juan Luis Vives, by Timothy G. Elston, 9–26.

2.         Mary Tudor: Renaissance Queen of England, by Judith M. Richards, 27–44.

3.         Unmasquing the Connections between Jacobean Politics and Policy: The Circle of Anna of Denmark and the Beginning of the English Empire, 1614–18, 45–60.

4.         Negotiating Exile: Henrietta Maria, Elizabeth of Bohemia, and the Court of Charles I, by Karen L. Nelson, 61–76.

II.        Imagining Renaissance Queens and Power

5.         “And a Queen of England Too”: The “Englishing” of Catherine of Aragon in Sixteenth-Century English Literary and Chronicle History, 79–100.

6.         Whore Queens: The Sexualized Female Body and the State, by Susan Dunn-Hensley, 101–116.

7.         “Honoured Hippolyta, Most Dreaded Amazonian: The Amazon Queen in the Works of Shakespeare and Fletcher, by Jo Eldridge Carney, 117–32.

8.         “No head imminent above the rest”: Female Authority in Othella and The Tempest, by Sid Ray, 133–50.

9.         “There’s magic in thy majesty”: Queenship and Witch-Speak in Jacobean Shakespeare, by Kirilka Stavreva, 151–67.

III.       Cultural Anxieties and Historical Echoes of Renaissance Queens

10.       The Taming of the Queen: Foxe’s Katherine and Shakespeare’s Kate, by Carole Levin, 171–86.

11.       Mary Queen of Scots as Suffering Woman: Representations by Mary Stuart and William Wordsworth, by Joy Currie, 187–202.

12.       Re-imagining a Renaissance Queen: Catherine of Aragon among the Victorians, by Georgianna Ziegler, 203–22.

13.       The Woman in Black: The Image of Catherine de Medici from Marlowe to Queen Margot, by Elaine Kruse, 223–38.

14.       Anne Boleyn in History, Drama, and Film, by Retha M. Warnicke, 239–56.

 

A History of Central European Women’s Writing. Ed. Celia Hawkesworth. New York: Palgrave, 2001.

I.          Women’s Writing in Central Europe before 1800

Introduction, by Celia Hawkesworth, 3–6.

1.         Women Readers and Writers in Medieval and Early Modern Bohemia, by Alfred Thomas, 7–13.

2.         Polish Women Authors: From the Middle Ages until 1800, by Ursula Phillips, 14–26.

3.         Women’s Writing in Hungary before 1800, by George Cushing, 27–32.

4.         Women in Croatian Literary Culture, 16th to 18th Centuries, by Dunja Falševac, 33–40.

Part II covers the nineteenth century and Parts III and IV the twentieth century.

 

“I have heard about you”: Foreign Women’s Writing Crossing the Dutch Border: From Sappho to Selma Lagerlöf. Ed. Susan Van Dijk (chief editor), Petra Broomans, Janet F. Van der Meulen, and Pim van Oostrum. Trans. Jo Nesbitt. Hilversum: Uitgeverif Verloren, 2004. [only articles related to early modern women are listed.]

Foreword:       Foreign Women’s Writing as Read in the Netherlands: A Task for Historiographers, by Suzan van Dijk, 9–33.

I.          Creating First Networks

3.         “In future times more than during your lifetime”: The Reception of Christine de Pizan in the Low Countries, by Anne-Marie de Gendt, 84–93.

4.         Women’s Albums: Mirrors of International Lyrical Poetry, by JohanOosterman, 94–99.

5.         Georgette de Montenay and her Dutch Admirer, Anna Roemers Visscher, by Riet Schenkeveld-van der Dussen, 100–107.

6.         “God has chosen you to be a crown of glory for all women!”: The International Network of Learned Women Surrounding Anna Maria van Schurman, by Mirjam de Baar, 108–35.

7.         Prophetess of God and Prolific Writer: Antoinette Bourignon and the Reception of her Writings, by Mirjam de Baar, 136–50.

II.        Finding International Audiences

8.         Dutch Interest in the 17th- and 18th-century French Tragedies Written by Women, by Pim van Oostrum, 153–72.

 

 

Ideals for Women in the Works of Christine de Pizan. Ed. Diane Bornstein. Michigan Consortium for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 1981.

1.         Self-Consciousness and Self Concepts in the Work of Christine de Pizan, by Diane Bornstein, 11–28.

2.         The Crowned Dame, Dame Opinion, and Dame Philosophy: The Female Characteristics of Three Ideals in Christine de Pizan’s Lavision-Christine, by Maureen Slattery Durley, 29–50.

3.         Christine de Pizan and the Order of the Rose, by Charity Cannon Willard, 51–67.

4.         Virginity as an Ideal in Christine de Pizan’s Cité des Dames, by Christine Reno, 69–90.

5.         Christine de Pizan’s Livre des Trois Vertus: Feminine Ideal or Practical Advice?, by Charity Cannon Willard, 91–116.

 

The Impact of Feminism in English Renaissance Studies. Ed. Dympna Callaghan. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.

1.         Introduction, by Dympna Callaghan, 1–30.

I.          Theories

2.         Cleopatran Affinities: Helene Cixous, Margaret Cavendish, and the Writing of Dialogic Matter, by Jonathan Gil Harris, 33–52.

3.         Confessing Mothers: the Maternal Penitent in Early Modern Revenge Tragedy, by Heather Hirschfield, 53–66.

4.         Feminist Criticism and the New Formalism: Early Modern Women and Literary Engagement, by Sasha Roberts, 67–92.

5.         Ophelia’s Sisters, by R.S. White, 93–115.

II.        Women

6.         Sex and the Early Modern City: Staging the Bawdy Houses of London, by Jean E. Howard, 117–36.

7.         Women, Gender, and the Politics of Location, by Kate Chedgzoy, 137–49.

8.         The “difference ... in degree”: Social Rank and Gendered Expression, by Kimberly Anne Coles, 137–49.

9.         A New Fable of the Belly: Vulgar Curiosity and the Persian Lady’s Loose Bodies, by Pamela Allen Brown, 150–70.

10.       Construing Gender: Mastering Bianca in The Taming of the Shrew, by Patricia Parker, 193–211.

III.       Histories

11.       Hermione’s Ghost: Catholicism, the Feminine, and the Undead, by Frances E. Dolan, 213–37.

12.       No Man’s Elizabeth: Frances A. Yates and the History of History, by Deanne Williams, 238–58.

13.       Women’s Informal Commerce and the “All-Male” Stage, by Natasha Korda, 259–80.

14.       Why Did Widows Remarry? Remarriage, Male Authority, and Feminist Criticism, by Jennifer Panek, 281–98.

15.       “I desire to be helde in your memory”: Reading Penelope Rich Through Her Letters, by Grace Ioppolo, 299–325.

16.       Hormonal Conclusions, by Gail Kern Paster, 326–333.

An Inimitable Example: The Case for the Princesse de Clèves. Ed. Patrick Henry. Washington, DC: Catholic University of America Press, 1992.

Introduction, by Patrick Henry, 1–12.

I.          Feminist Readings

1.         Emphasis Added: Plots and Plausibilities in Women’s Fiction, 15–38.

2.         Lafayette’s Ellipses: The Privileges of Anonymity, by Joan Dejean, 39–70.

3.         The Princesse de Clèves: An Inimitable Model?, by Donna Kuizenga, 71–83.

II.        Sociocritical Readings

4.         Aristocratic Ethos and Ideological Codes in La Princesse de Clèves, by Ralph Albanese, Jr., 87–103.

5.         The Economy of Love in La Princesse de Clèves, by Philippe Desan, 104–24.

III.       Ethical and Religious Readings

6.         Trapped between Romance and Novel: A Defense of the Princesse de Clèves, by Steven Rendall, 127–38.

7.         The Princess and Her Spiritual Guide: On the Influence of Preaching on Fiction, by Wolfgang Leiner, 139–55.

8.         La Princesse de Clèves and L’Introduction à la vie dévote, by Patrick Henry, 156–80.

9.         Declining Dangerous Liaisons: The Argument against Love, by Francis L. And Mary K. Lawrence, 181–91.

IV.       Psychological Readings

10.       The Princesse de Clèves’s Will to Order, by Michael S. Koppisch, 195–208.

11.       In Search of Selfhood: The Itinerary of the Princesse de Clèves, by Marie-Odile Sweetser, 209–24.

12.       The Power of Confession: The Ideology of Love in La Princesse de Clèves, by Jane Marie Todd, 225–34.

Epilogue, by John D. Lyons, 235–55.

 

International Colloquium Celebrating the 500th Anniversary of the Birth of Marguerite de Navarre. Ed. Règine Reynolds-Cornell. Summa Publications, 1995. [only essays in English are included]

1.         The Vision of the Renaissance during the Reign of Marguerite de Navarre, by Donna Sadler, 5–14.

2.         Marguerite de Navarre, Her Circle, and the Censors of Paris, by James K. Farge, 15–28.

4.         Italian Music in French Renaissance Courts: A Hint from the Heptaméron, by F. Ellsworth Peterson, 37–44.

6.         Diotima Liberata, by Matthew Morris, 53–62.

8.         Marguerite de Navarre’s Heptameron and the Received Idea: The Problematics of Lovesickness, by Donald Allen Beecher, 71–78.

 

The Invention of Pornography: Obscenity and the Origins of Modernity, 1500–1800. Ed. Lynn Hunt. New York: Zone Books, 1996.

Introduction: Obscenity and the Origins of Modernity, 1500–1800, by Lynn Hunt, 9–46.

I.          Early Political and Cultural Meanings

1.         Humanism, Politics and Pornography in Renaissance Italy, by Paula Findlen, 49–108.

2.         The Politics of Pornography: L’Ecole des Filles, by Joan DeJean, 109–24.

3.         Sometimes a Scepter is Only a Scepter: Pornography and Politics in Restoration England, by Rachel Weil, 125–55.

II.        Philosophical and Formal Qualities

4.         The Materialist World of Pornography, by Margaret C. Jacob, 157–202.

5.         Truth and the Obscene Word in Eighteenth-Century French Pornography, by Lucienne Frappier-Mazur, 203–24.

6.         The Libertine Whore: Prostitution in French Pornography from Margot to Juliette, by Kathryn Norberg, 225–52.

7.         Erotic Fantasy and Male Libertinism in Enlightenment England, by Randolph Trambach, 253–82.

8.         Politics and Pornography in the Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Dutch Republic, by Wijnand H. Mynhardt, 283–300.

9.         Pornography and the French Revolution, by Lynn Hunt, 301–40.

Notes, 341–400.

 

Italian Women and the City. Ed. Janet Levarie Smarr and Daria Valentini. Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2003.

1.         Introduction, by Janet Levarie Smarr, 9–17.

2.         Veneta Figurata and Women in Sixteenth-Century Venice: Moderate Fonte’s Writings, by Paola Malpezzi Price, 18–34.

3.         Courtesans, Celebrity, and Print Culture in Renaissance Venice: Tullia d’Aragona, Gaspara Stampa, and Veronica Franco, by Diana Robin, 35–59.

4.         Florence and the Feminine, by Mary Kisler, 60–76.

5.         Women and Errant Speech in Renaissance Theater, by Jane Tylus, 77–97.

6.         A Myth Reclaimed: Rome in Twentieth-Century Women’s Writings, by Angela M. Jeannet, 98–125.

7.         “I’m From Trento”: The Cities of Senso, by Ernesto Livorni, 126–38.

8.         A “Plebian Nymph” in Naples: “Representational Spaces” and Labyrinth in Domenico Rea’s Ninfa plebea, by Roberta Morosini, 139–73.

9.         Where East meets West: Juliana Morandini’s Mitteleuropean Trilogy, by Daria Valentini, 174–86.

10.       “Urban Winter Landscape with Female Figures”: Representations of Space in Fausta Cialente’s Un inverno freddissimo, by David Papotti, 187–200.

11.       Contextualizing Marginality: Urban Landscape and Female Communities in Cesare Pavesi’s Among Women Only, by Vincenzo Binetti, 201–14.

12.       Ortese’s Naples: Urban Malaise through a visionary Gaze, by Andra Baldi, 215–38.

 

Italian Women Artists : From Renaissance to Baroque. Ed. Claudio M. Strinati, Carole Collier Frick, Elizabeth S. G. Nicholson, Vera Fortunati Pietrantonio, Jordana Pomeroy, and National Museum of Women in the Arts, Sylvestre Verger Art Organization. New York: Skira, 2007, distributed in North America by Rizzoli International.

Introduction: On the Origins of Women Painters, by Claudio Strinati, 15–18.

1.         Italian Women Artists from Renaissance to Baroque, by Jordana Pomeroy, 19–22.

2.         The Economics of the Woman Artist, by Caroline P. Murphy, 23–30.

3.         Wife, Widow, Nun, and Court Lady: Women Patrons of the Renaissance and Baroque, by Sheila ffolliott, 31–40.

4.         Toward a History of Women Artists in Bologna between the Renaissance and the Baroque: Additions and Clarifications, byVera Fortunati, 41–48.

5.         Sofonisba, Lavinia, Artemisia, and Elisabetta: Thirty Years after Women Artists, 1550–1950, by Ann Sutherland Harris, 49–62.

6.         Painting Personal Identity: The Costuming of Nobildonne, Heroines, and Kings, by Carole Collier Frick, 63–74.

7.         The “Woman Artist” in Literature: Fiction or Non-Fiction?, by Alexandra Lapierre, 75–84.

8.         Catalogue, by Caterina Vigri, 85–89.

Properzia de' Rossi, 90–95.

Eufrasia Burlamacchi, 96–102.

Plautilla Nelli, 103–5.

Sofonisba Anguissola, 106–23.

Lucia Anguissola, 123–25.

Diana Scultori (aka Ghisi), 126–34.

Lavinia Fontana, 135–66.

Barbara Longhi, 167–72.

Fede Galizia, 173–82.

Lucrina Fetti, 183–88.

Chiara Varotari, 189–94.

Elisabetta Catanea Parasole, 195–97.

Artemisia Gentileschi, 198–213.

Orsola Maddalena Caccia, 214–219.

Giovanna Garzoni, 220–40.

Elisabetta Sirani, 241–56.

 

Julian of Norwich: A Book of Essays. Ed. Sandra J. McEntire. New York: Garland, 1998.

1.         The Likeness of God and the Restoration of Humanity in Julian of Norwich’s Showings, by Sandra J. McEntire, 3–33.

2.         The Image of God: Contrasting Configurations in Julian of Norwich’s Showings and Walter Hilton’s Scale of Perfection, by Denise N. Baker, 35–60.

3.         The Trinitarian Hermeneutic in Julian of Norwich’s Revelation of Love, by Nicholas Watson, 61–90.

4.         St. Cecilia and St. John of Beverly: Julian of Norwich’s Early Model and Late Affirmation, by Susan K. Hagen, 91–114.

5.         A Genre Approach to Julian of Norwich’s Epistemology, by Brad Peters, 115–52.

6.         The Point of Coincidence: Rhetoric and the Apophatic in Julian of Norwich’s Showings, by Cynthea Masson, 153–81.

7.         “I wolde for thy love dye”: Julian, Romance Discourse, and the Masculine, by Jay Ruud, 183–205.

8.         Julian’s Diabology, by David F. Tinley, 207–37.

9.         “In the Lowest Part of Our Need”: Julian and Medieval Gynecological Writing, by Alexandra Barratt, 239–56.

10.       A Question of Audience: The Westminster Text and Fifteenth-Century Reception of Julian of Norwich, by Hugh Kempster, 257–89.

11.       Leaving the Womb of Christ: Love, Doomsday, and Space/Time in Julian of Norwich and Eastern Orthodox Mysticism, by Brant Pelphrey, 291–320.

 

King, Margaret L. Humanism, Venice, and Women: Essays on the Italian Renaissance. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2007.

III.       Renaissance Women And Renaissance Culture

1.         Thwarted Ambitions: Six Learned Women of the Renaissance.

2.         The Religious Retreat of Isotta Nogarola (1418–66): Sexism and Its Consequences in the Fifteenth Century

3.         Goddess and Captive: Antonio Loschi’s Epistolary Ttribute to Maddalena Scrovegni (1389)

4.         Book-Lined Cells: Women and Humanism in the Early Italian Renaissance

5.         Mothers of the Renaissance

 

A Labor of Love: Critical Reflections on the Writings of Marie-Catherine Desjardins (Mme de Villedieu). Ed. Roxanne Decker Lalande. Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2000.

I.          Introduction

1.         Writing Straight from the Heart, by Roxanne Decker Lalande, 15–29.

II.        Dramatic Works

2.         Conspirators and Tyrants in the Plays of Villedieu, by Perry Gethner, 31–42.

3.         Staging Foucquet: Historical and Theatrical Contexts of Villedieu’s Le Favori, by Chloé Hogg, 43–63.

4.         Men in Love in the Plays of Mme de Villedieu, by Henrietta Goldwyn, 64–84.

III.       Short Stories, Annals, and Letters

5.         Inscribing the Feminine in Seventeenth-Century Narratives: The Case of Madame de Villedieu, by Nancy D. Klein, 87–110.

6.         Secret Writing, Public Reading: Madame de Villedieu’s Lettres et Billets Galants, by Elizabeth C. Goldsmith, 111–29.

IV.       Novelistic Works: Les Mémoires de la vie de Henriette-Sylvie de Molière

7.         Villedieu’s Transvestite Text: The Literary Economy of Gender and Genre in Les Mémoires de la vie de Henriette-Sylvie de Molière, by Margaret P. Wise, 131–46.

8.         The Play of Pleasure and the Pleasure of Play in the Mémoires de la vie de Henriette-Sylvie de Molière, by Donna Kuizinga, 147–64.

9.         Sex, Lies, and Authorship in Villedieu’s Désordre de l’amour, by Roxanne Decker Lalande, 165–76.

 

Literacy and the Lay Reader, Ed. Paul Maurice Clogan. Medievalia et Humanistica: Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Culture, New Series # 27. Lanham, MD: Rowan and Littlefield, 2000.

1.         Fashioning a Woman: The Vernacular Pygmalion in the Roman de la Rose, by Sarah-Grace Heller, 1–18.

2.         Unnatural Authority: Translating Beyond the Heroic in The Wife’s Lament, by Susan Signe Morrison, 19–32.

3.         Like Wise Master Builders: Jean Gerson’s Ecclesiology, Lectio Divina, and Christine de Pizan’s Livre de la Cité des Dames, by Mary Agnes Edsall, 33–56.

4.         The Lay Gaze: Pearl, the Dreamer, and the Vernacular Reader, by Kevin L. Gustafson, 57–78.

5.         Consolatio: Don Ishaq Abravanel and the Classical Tradition, by Eleazar Gutwirth, 79–97.

The Literary Career and Legacy of Elizabeth Cary, 1613–1680. Ed. Heather R. Wolfe. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2007.

Introduction, by Heather Wolfe, 1–13.

I.          The Tragedy of Mariam, 15–16.

1.         Private Lyrics in Elizabeth Cary’s The Tragedy of Mariam, by Ilona Bell, 17–34

2.         Mariam and Early Modern Discourses of Martyrdom, by Erin E. Kelly, 35–52.

3.         Elizabeth Cary’s Historical Conscience: The Tragedy of Mariam and Thomas Lodge’s Josephus, by Alison Shell, 53–67

II.        Edward II, 69–70.

4.         “Royal Fever” and “The Giddy Commons”: Cary’s History of the Life, Reign, and Death of Edward II and the Buckingham Phenomenon, by Curtis Perry, 71–88.

5.         “Fortune is a Stepmother”: Gender and Political Discourse in Elizabeth Cary’s History of Edward II, by Mihoko Suzuki, 89–106.

6.         A Bibliographical Palimpsest: The Post-Publication History of the 1680 Octavo Pamphlet, The History of the Most Unfortunate Prince, King Edward II, by Jesse G. Swan, 107–24.

7.         From Manuscript to Printed Text: Telling and Retelling the History of Edward II, by Margaret Reeves, 125–43.

III.       Other Writings, 145

8.         “To informe thee aright”: Translating Du Perron for English Religious Debates,” by Karen L. Nelson, 147–64.

9.         Elizabeth Cary and the Great Tew Circle, by R. W. Serjeantson, 165–82.

10.       “Reader, Stand Still and Look, Lo Here I Am”: Elizabeth Cary’s Funeral Elegy “On the Duke of Buckingham,” by Nadine N. W. Akkerman, 183–99.

IV.       Literary Patronage and Letters, 201

11.       “A More Worthy Patronesse”: Elizabeth Cary and Ireland, by Deana Rankin, 203-22.

12.       “To have her children with her”: Elizabeth Cary and Familial Influence, by Marion Wynne-Davies, 223–41.

 

Maids and Mistresses, Cousins and Queens: Women’s Alliances in Early Modern England. Ed. Susan Frye and Karen Robertson. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.

Introduction, by Susan Frye and Karen Robertson, 3–17.

I.          Alliance in the City

1.         Maidservants of London: Sisterhoods of Kinship and Labor, by Ann Rosalind Jones, 21–32.

2.         Women, Work, and Plays in an English Medieval Town, by Mary Wack, 33–51.

3.         Women’s Networks and the Female Vagrant: A Hard Case, by Jodi Mikalachki, 52–69.

4.         “No Good Thing Ever Comes Out of It”: Male Expectation and Female Alliance in Dekker and Webster’s Westward Ho, by Simon Morgan-Russell, 70–84.

II.        Alliances in the Household

5.         “A P[ar]cell of Murdereing Bitches”: Female Relationships in an Eighteenth-Century Slaveholding Household, by Kathleen M. Brown, 87–97.

6.         The Appropriation of Pleasure in The Magnetic Lady, by Helen Ostovich, 98–113.

7.         Female Alliance and the Construction of Homoeroticism in As You Like It and Twelfth Night, by Jessica Tvordi, 114–30.

8.         “Companion Me with My Mistress”: Cleopatra, Elizabeth I, and Their Waiting Women, by Elizabeth A. Brown, 131–45.

III.       Materializing Communities

9.         Tracing Women’s Connections from a Letter, by Elizabeth Ralegh, 149–64.

10.       Sewing Connections: Elizabeth Tudor, Mary Stuart, Elizabeth Talbot, and Seventeenth-Century Anonymous Needleworkers, by Susan Frye, 165–82.

11.       “Faire Eliza’s Chaine”: Two Female Writers’ Literary Links to Queen Elizabeth I, by Lisa Gim, 183–98.

12.       Mary Ward’s “Jesuitresses” and the Construction of a Typological Community, by Lowell Gallagher, 199–217.

IV.       Emerging Alliances

13.       The Dearth of the Author: Anonymity’s Allies and Swetnam the Woman-hater, by Valerie Wayne, 221–40.

14.       The Erotics of Female Friendship in Early Modern England, by Harriette Andreadis, 241–58.

15.       Alliance and Exile: Aphra Behn’s Racial Identity, by Margo Hendricks, 259–73.

16.       Aemilia Lanyer and the Invention of White Womanhood, by Barbara Bowen, 274–303.

Afterword: Producing New Knowledge, by Jean Howard, 305–11.

 

The Marital Economy in Scandinavia and Britain 1400–1900. Ed. Maria Ågren and Amy Louise Erickson. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2005.

Introduction:   The Marital Economy in Comparative Perspective, by Amy Louise Erickson, 3–21.

I.          Forming the Partnership

1.         Marriage or Money? Legal Actions for Enforcement of Marriage Contracts in Norway, by Hanne Marie Johansen, 23–38.

2.         Making Marriages in Early Modern England: Rethinking the Role of Family and Friends, by Catherine Frances, 39–56.

3.         Forming the Partnership Socially and Economically: A Swedish Local Elite, 1650–1770, by Gudrun Andersson, 57–74.

4.         Forming the Marital Economy in the Early Modern Finnish Countryside, by Anu Pylkkänen, 75–88.

5.         Servants in Rural England c.1450–1650: Hired Work as a Means of Accumulating Wealth and Skills before Marriage, by Jane Whittle, 89–109.

II.        Managing the Partnership

6.         Decision-Making on Marital Property in Norway, 1500–1800, by Hilde Sandvik, 101–26.

7.         Property and Authority in Danish Marital Law, by Inger Dübeck, 127–40.

8.         Marital Conflict over the Gender Division of Labor in Agrarian households, Sweden 1750–1850, by Rosemarie Fiebranz, 141–56.

9.         Working Together? Different Understandings of Marital Relations in Late 19th-Century Finland, by Ann-Catrin Östman, 157–73.

III.       Dissolving the Partnership

10.       Marriage Trouble, Separation and Divorce in Early Modern Norway, by Hanne Marie Johansen, 175–90.

11.       “To the longer liver”: Provisions for the Dissolution of the Marital Economy in Scotland, 1470–1550, by Elizabeth Ewan, 191–206.

12.       Death and Donation: Different Channels of Property Transfer in Late Medieval Iceland, by Agnes S. Arnórsdóttir, 207–20.

13.       Individualism or Self-Sacrifice? Decision-Making and Retirement within the Early Modern Marital Economy in Sweden, by Maria Ågren, 221–38.

Afterword:      Recovering a Lost Inheritance: The Marital Economy and its Absence from the Prehistory of Economics in Britain, by Michael Roberts, 239–56.

 

Marriage in Italy 1300–1650. Ed. Trevor Dean and K. J. P. Lowe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Introduction: Issues in the History of Marriage, by Trevor Dean and K. J. P. Lowe, 1–23.

I.          Ceremonies and Festivities

1.         Wedding Finery in Sixteenth-century Venice, by Patricia Allerston, 25–40.

2.         Secular Brides and Convent Brides: Wedding Ceremonies in Italy during the Reformation and Counter-Reformation, 41–65.

3.         The Rape of the Sabine Women in Quattrocento Marriage-panels, by Jacqueline Musacchio, 66–82.

II.        Intervention by Church and State

4.         Fathers and Daughters: Marriage Laws and Marriage Disputes in Bologna and Italy, 1200–1500, by Trevor Dean, 85–106.

5.         Marriage Ceremonies and the Church in Italy after 1215, by David d’Avray, 107–15.

6.         Dowry and the Conversion of the Jews in Sixteenth-century Rome: Competition between the Church and the Jewish Community, by Piet Van Boxel, 116–27.

7.         Nobility, Women and the State: Marriage Regulation in Venice, 1420–1535, by Stanley Chojnacki, 128–52.

III.       Patterns of Intermarriage

8.         Marriage, Faction, and Conflict in Sixteenth-century Italy: An Example and a few Questions, by Gerard Delille, 155–73.

9.         Marriage in the Mountains: The Florentine Territorial State, 1348–1500, by Samuel Kline Cohn, Jr., 174–96.

10.       Marriage and Politics at the Papal Court in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, by Irene Fosi and Maria Antionetta Visceglia, 197–224.

IV.       Consequences and Endings

11.       Bending the Rules: Marriage in Renaissance Collections of Biographies of Famous Women, 227–48.

12.       Separation and Separated Couples in Fourteenth-century Venice, by Linda Guzzetti, 249–74.

13.       Reconstructing the Family: Widowhood and Remarriage in Tuscany in the Early Modern Period, by Giulia Calvi, 275–95.

 

Maternal Measures: Figuring Caregiving in the Early Modern Period. Ed. Naomi J. Miller and Naomi Yavneh. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2000.

1.         Mothering Others: Caregiving as Spectrum and Spectacle in the Early Modern Period, by Naomi J. Miller, 1–25.

I.          Conception and Lactation

2.         Mirrors of Language, Mirrors of Self: The Conceptualization of Artistic Identity in Gaspara Stampa and Sofonisba Anguissola,” by Judith Rose, 29–48.

3.         Midwiving Virility in Early Modern England, by Caroline Bicks, 49–64.

4.         To Bare or Not Too Bare: Sofonisba Anguissola’s Nursing Madonna and the Womanly Art of Breast feeding, by Naomi Yavneh, 65–81.

5.         “But Blood Whitened”: Nursing Mothers and Others in Early Modern Britain, by Rachel Trubowitz, 82–101.

II.        Nurture and Instruction

6.         Language and “Mothers’ Milk”: Maternal Roles and the Nurturing Body in Early Modern Spanish Texts, by Emilie L. Bergmann, 105–20.

7.         Motherhood and Protestant Polemics: Stillbirth in Hans von Rüte’s Aboötterei (1531), by Gleen Ehrstine, 121–34.

8.         The Virgin’s Voice: Representations of Mary in Seventeenth-Century Italian Song, by Claire Fontijn, 135–62.

9.         “His open side our book”: Meditation and Education in Elizabeth Grymeston’s Miscelanea Meditations Memoratives, by Edith Snook, 163–75.

III.       Domestic Production

10.       Negativizing Nurture and Demonizing Domesticity: The Witch Construct in Early Modern Germany, by Nancy Hayes, 179–200.

11.       The Difficult Birth of the Good Mother: Donneau de Visé’s L’Embarras de Godard, ou l’Accouchée, by Deborah Steinberger, 201–11.

12.       “Players in your huswifery, and huswives in your beds”: Conflicting Identities of Early Modern English Women, by Mary Thomas Crane, 212–23.

13.       Maternal Textualities, by Susan Frye, 224–36.

IV.       Social Authority

14.       “My Mother Musicke”: Music and Early Modern Fantasies of Embodiment, by Linda Phyllis Austern, 239–81.

15.       Marian Devotion and Maternal Authority in Seventeenth-Century England, by Frances E. Dolan, 282–92.

16.       Mother Love: Clichés and Amazons in Early Modern England, by Kathryn Schwarz, 293–305.

17.       Native Mothers, Native Others: La Malinche, Pocahontas, and Sacajawca, by Kari Boyd McBride, 306–16.

V.        Mortality

18.       London’s Mourning Garment: Maternity, Mourning and Royal Succession, by Patricia Philippy, 319–32.

19.       Early Modern Medea: Representations of Child Murder in the Street Literature of Seventeenth-Century England, by Susan C. Staub, 333–47.

20.       “I fear there will a worse come in his place”: Surrogate Parents and Shakespeare’s Richard III, by Heather Dubrow, 348–62.

 

Modern Spain: Sophia’s Daughters. Ed. Bárbara Mujica. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2004. [Introduction in English, texts in Spanish; focuses on early modern writers]

 

Musical Voices of Early Modern Women: Many-Headed Melodies. Ed. Thomasin LaMay. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2005.

Introduction to The Many Headed Ones

1.         Preliminaries, by Thomasin LaMay, 3–14.

2.         Portrait of the Artist as (Female) Musician, by Linda Phyllis Austern, 15–60.

I.          Women En-Voiced

3.         Chivalric Romance, Courtly Love and Courtly Song: Female Vocality and Feminine Desire in the World of Amadis de Gaule , by Jeanice Brooks, 63–96.

4.         Music and Women in Early Modern Spain: Some Discrepancies between Educational Theory and Musical Practice, by Pilar Ramos López, 97–118.

5.         Virtue, Illusion, Venezianità: Vocal Bravura and the Early Cortigiana Onesta, by Shawn Marie Keener, 119–34.

6.         Strong Men–Weak Women: Gender Representation and the Influence of Lully's 'Operatic Style' on French Airs Sérieux (1650–1700), by Catherine E. Gordon-Seifert, 135–69.

II.        Women On Stage

7.         From Whore to Stuart Ally: Musical Venuses on the Early Modern English Stage, by Amanda Eubanks Winkler, 171–86.

8.         With a Sword by Her Side and a Lute in Her Lap: Moll Cutpurse at the Fortune, by Raphael Seligmann, 187–210.

9.         La sirena antica dell’Adriatico: Caterina Porri, a Seventeenth-Century Roman Prima Donna on the Stages of Venice, Bologna, and Pavia, by Beth L. Glixon, 211–38.

10.       Serf Actresses in the Tsarinas' Russia: Social Class Cross-Dressing in Russian Serf Theaters of the Eighteenth Century, by Inna Naroditskaya, 239–69.

III.       Women from the Convents

11.       The Good Mother, the Reluctant Daughter, and the Convent: A Case of Musical Persuasion, by Colleen Reardon, 271–86.

12.       “Hired” Nun Musicians in Early Modern Castile, by Colleen Baade, 287–310.

13.       Sor Juana Inès de la Cruz and Music: Mexico’s “Tenth Muse”, by Enrique Alberto Arias, 311–35.

IV.       Women, Collections, and Publishing

14.       Patronage and Personal Narrative in a Music Manuscript: Marguerite of Austria, Katherine of Aragon, and London Royal 8 G.vii, by Jennifer Thomas, 337–64.

15.       Composing from the Throat Madalena Casulana's Primo Libro de Madrigali, 1568, by Thomasin LaMay, 365–98.

16.       Princess Elizabeth Stuart as Musician and Muse, by Janet Pollack, 399–424.

17.       Epilogue: Francesca Among Women, a ‘600 Gynecentric View, by Suzanne Cusick, 425–44.

 

The Mysteries of Elizabeth I: Selections from English Literary Renaissance. Ed. Kirby Farrell and Kathleen Swain. Amherst and Boston: University of Massachusetts Press, 2003. Preface, The Mysteries of Elizabeth I, by Kirby Farrell

1.         Performance and Reality at the Court of Elizabeth I, by F. W. Brownlow, 3–20.

2.         Elizabeth’s Coronation Entry (1559): New Manuscript Evidence, by David M. Bergeron, 21–30.

3.         Queen Elizabeth at Oxford: New Light on the Royal Plays of 1566, by John R. Elliott, Jr., 31–42.

4.         Queen Elizabeth, Dol Common, and the Performance of the Royal Maundy, by Caroline McManus, 43–66.

5.         “The Arte of a Ladies Penne”: Elizabeth I and the Poetics of Queenship, by Jennifer Summit, 67–96.

6.         The French Verses of Elizabeth I (Text), by Steven W. May and Anne Lake Prescott, 97–133.

7.         “Mother of my Countreye”: Elizabeth I and Tudor Constructions of Motherhood, by Christine Coch, 134–61.

8.         “Eliza, Queene of shepheardes,” and the Pastoral of Power, by Louis Adrian Montrose, 162–91.

9.         Returning to Elizabethan Protest, Plague, and Plays: Rereading the “Documents of Control”, by Barbara Freedman, 192–216.

10.       Elizabeth Southwell’s Manuscript Account of the Death of Queen Elizabeth [with Text], by Catherine Loomis, 217–44.

11.       “Old Bess in the Ruff”: Remembering Elizabeth I, 1625–1660, by John Watkins, 245–66.

12.       Doing the Queen: Gender, Sexuality, and the Censorship of Elizabeth I’s Royal Image in Twentieth-Century Mass Media, by Richard Burt, 267–78.

13.       Recent Studies in Elizabeth I, by Steven W. May, 279–94.

 

The Mystical Gesture: Essays on Medieval and Early Modern Spiritual Culture in Honor of Mary E. Giles. Ed. Robert Boenig. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2000. [only essays related to women in early modern Europe are listed]

4.         Ecstasy, Prophecy, and Reform: Catherine of Siena as a Model for Holy Women of Sixteenth-Century Spain, by Gillian T. W. Ahlgren, 53–66.

6.         What's in a Name: On Teresa of Avila's Book, by Elizabeth Rhodes, 79–106.

7.         Teresa and Her Sisters, by Jane Ackerman, 107–140.

9.         The Beautiful Dove, the Body Divine: Luisa de Carvajal y Mendoza's Mystical Poetics, by Michael Bradburn-Ruster, 159–68.

10.       Cecilia del Nacimiento: Mystic in the Tradition of John of the Cross, by Evelyn Toft, 169–84.

11.       Inside My Body Is the Body of God: Margaret Mary Alacoque and the Tradition of Embodied Mysticism, by Wendy M. Wright, 185)92.

12.       Making Use of the Holy Office: Exploring the Contexts and Concepts of Sor Juana's References to the Inquisition in the Respuesta a Sor Filotea, by Amanda Powell, 193–216.


Narrative Worlds: Essays on the Nouvelle in Fifteenth- and Sixteenth-Century France. Ed. Gary Ferguson and David LaGuardia. MRTS, vol. 285. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005.

Introduction, by the editors, 1–15.

1.         “Une merveilleuse espece d’animal”: Fable and Verisimilitude in Bonaventure des Périers’s Nouvelles récréations et joyeux devis, by Emily Thompson, 17–33.

2.         Des Périers on Speed, by Tom Conley, 35–58.

3.         Monkey Business: Imitation and the Status of the Text in Du Fail’s Propos rustiques, by Richard L. Regosin, 59–75.

4.         Jeanne Flore and Erotic Desire: Feminism or Male Fantasy?, by Floyd Gray, 77–95.

5.         History or Her Story? (Homo)sociality / sexuality in Marguerite de Navarre’s Heptaméron 12, by Gary Ferguson, 97–122.

6.         Fictions of the Eyewitness, by John O’Brien, 123–38.

7.         Exemplarity as Misogyny: Variations on the Tale of the One-Eyed Cuckold, by David LaGuardia, 139–58.

8.         Jacques Yver’s Le Printemps d’Yver and Trans-Gender Phantasmagoria, by Deborah N. Losse, 159–72.

 

Oroonoko: Adaptations and Offshoots. Ed. Susan B. Iwanisziw. The Early Modern Englishwoman, 1500–1750. Contemporary Editions. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2006.

Introduction, by Susan B. Iwanisziw, xi

1.         Oroonoko, A Tragedy, by Thomas Southerne, 1–80.

2.         The Sexes Mis-Match'd, by anonymous, 81–103.

3.         Oroonoko, A Tragedy as it is Now Acted at the Theatre-Royal, Drury Lane and John Hawkesworth, 104–62.

4.         Excerpts from Oroonoko: or the Royal Slave, A Tragedy, by Francis Gentleman, 163–84.

5.         Excerpts from Oroonoko, A Tragedy Altered from the Original Play of that Name, Written by the late Thomas Southern, Esq., anonymous, 185–202.

6.         The Prince of Angola, by John Ferriar, 203–57.

7.         Slavery, A Poem, by Hannah More, 258–71.

8.         The Benevolent Planters, by Thomas Bellamy, 272–87.

9.         Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko in a New Adaptation, by ’Biyi Bandele, 288–365.

 

Perspectives on Feminist Political Thought in European History: From the Middle Ages to the Present. Ed. Tjitske Akkerman and Siep Sturman. London and New York: Routledge, 1998. [only chs. 1–4 deal with the early modern period]

1.         Introduction: Feminism in European History, Akkerman and Sturman, 1–33.

2.         The Languages of Late-Medieval Feminism, by Miri Rubin, 34–4j9

3.         A ‘learned wave’: Women of Letters and Science from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment, by Brita Rang, 50–66.

4.         L’égalité des sexes qui ne se conteste plus en France: Feminism in the Seventeenth Century, by Siep Stuurman, 67–84

 

Political Rhetoric, Power, and Renaissance Women. Ed. Carole Levin and Patricia A. Sullivan. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1995.

1.         Politics, Women’s Voices, and the Renaissance: Questions and Context, by Carole Levin and Patricia .A. Sullivan, 1–14.

2.         Christine de Pizan’s Cité des Dames and Trésor de la Cité: Toward a Feminist Scriptural Practice, by Daniel Kempton, 15–38.

3.         Conflicting Rhetoric about Tudor Women: The Example of Queen Anne Boleyn, by Retha Warnicke, 39–56.

4.         Elizabeth I—Always Her Own Free Woman, by Ilona Bell, 57–84.

5.         The Fictional Families of Elizabeth I, by Lena Cowen Orlin, 85–112.

6.         Dutifully Defending Elizabeth: Lord Henry Howard and the Question of Queenship, by Dennis Moore, 113–38.

7.         The Blood-Stained Hands of Catherine de Médicis, by Elaine Kruse, 139–56.

8.         Expert Witnesses and Secret Subjects: Anne Askew’s Examinations and Renaissance Self-Incrimination, by Elizabeth Mazzola, 157–72

9.         Mary Baynton and Anne Burnell: Madness and Rhetoric in Two Tudor Family Romans, by Carole Levin, 173–88.

10.       Queenship in Shakespeare’s Henry VIII: The Issue of Issue, by Jo Eldridge Carney, 189–204.

11.       Reform or Rebellion? The Limits of Female Authority in Elizabeth Cary’s The History of the Life, Reign, and Death of Edward II, by Gwynne Kennedy, 205–22.

12.       Wits, Whigs, and Women: Domestic Politics as Anti-Whig Rhetoric in Aphra Behn’s Town Comedies, by Arlen Feldwick, 223–42.

13.       Queen Mary II: Image and Substance During the Glorious Revolution, by W. M. Spellman, 243–56.

14.       The Politics of Renaissance Rhetorical Theory by Women, by Jane Donawerth, 257–74.

15.       Women and Political Communication: From the Margins to the Center, by Patricia A. Sullivan and Carole Levin, 275–82.

 

Politics, Gender, and Genre: The Political Thought of Christine de Pizan. Ed. Margaret Brabant. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1992.

1.         Introduction, by Margaret Brabant, 1–6.

2.         The Political Significance of Christine de Pizan, by Eric Hicks, 7–15

3.         Christine de Pizan: From Poet to Political Commentator, by Charity Cannon Willard, 17–32.

4.         Polycracy, Obligation, and Revolt: The Body Politic in John of Salisbury and Christine de Pizan, by Kate Langdon Forhan, 33–52.

5.         Christine de Pizan and the Jews: Political and Poetic Implications, by Nadia Margolis, 53–73.

6.         French Cultural Nationalism and Christian Universalism in the Works of Christine de Pizan, by Earl Jeffrey Richards, 75–94.

7.         L’Avision Christine: Autobiographical Narrative or Mirror for the Prince? by Rosalind Brown-Grant, 95–111.

8.         Vox Femina, Vox Politica: The Lamentacion sur les maux de la France, by Margarete Zimmermann, trans. E. J. Richards, 113–27.

9.         Authority in the Prose Treatises of Christine de Pizan: The Writer’s Discourse and the Prince’s Word, by Liliane Dulac, trans. E. J. Richards, 129–40.

10.       The Political Rhetoric of Christine de Pizan: Lamentacion sur les maux de la guerre civile, by Linda Leppig, 141–56.

11.       The Subversive “Seulette,” by Mary McKinley, 157–69.

12.       Christine de Pizan: At Best a Contradictory Figure? Christine M. Reno, 171–91.

13.       History, Politics, and Christine Studies: A Polemical Reply, by Sheila Delany, 193–206.


The Politics of Gender in Early Modern Europe. Ed. Jean R. Brink, Allison P. Coudert, and Maryanne C. Horowitz. Sixteenth Century Essays & Studies 12. Kirksville, MO: Sixteenth Century Journal Publications, 1989.

General Introduction, 9–10

I.          The Witch as a Focus for Cultural Misogyny

1.         Introduction, by William Monter, 13–14.

2.         An Anthropological Perspective on the Witchcraze, by James L. Brain, 15–28.

3.         Martin Luther on Witchcraft: A True Reformer? by Sigrid Brauner, 29–42.

4.         Witchcraft and Domestic Tragedy in The Witch of Edmonton, by Viviana Comensoli, 43–60.

5.         The Myth of the Improved Status of Protestant Women: The Case of the Witchcraze, by Allison P. Coudert, 61–89.

II.        Marginalized Worthies and Private Letters

6.         Introduction, by Jean R. Brink, 93–94.

7.         Power, Politics, and Sexuality: Images of Elizabeth I, by Carole Levin, 95–110.

8.         The Virgin of Venice and Concepts of the Millennium in Venice, by Marion L. Kuntz, 111–30.

9.         Footnotes to the Canon: Maria von Wolkenstein and Argula von Grumbach, by Albrecht Classen, 131–49.

10.       Letters By Women in England, the French Romance, and Dorothy Osborne, by James Fitzmaurice and Martine Rey, 149–60.

 

Power and Gender in Renaissance Spain: Eight Women of the Mendoza Family, 1450–1650. Ed. Helen Nader. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2004.

Introduction: The World of the Mendozas, by Helen Nader, 1–26.

1.         Juana Pimentel, The Mendoza Family, and the Crown, by Cristian Berco, 27–47.

2.         In Search of Juana de Mendoza, by Ronald E. Surtz, 48–70.

3.         Rebel with a Cause, by Stephanie Fink, 71–92.

4.         Books in the Sewing Basket, by María del Carmen Vaquero Serrano, 93–112.

5.         On the Margins of the Mendozas: Luisa de la Cerda and María de San José (Salazar), by María Pilar Manero Sorolla, 113–31.

6.         Choosing her own Buttons: The Guardianship of Magdalena de Bobadilla, by Grace E. Coolidge, 132–51.

7.         Mother Love in the Renaissance: The Princess of Éboli’s Letters to Her Favorite Son, by Helen H. Reed, 152–76.

8.         Willing Desire: Luisa de Carvajal y Mendoza and Female Subjectivity, by Anne J. Cruz, 177–93.

The Practice and Representation of Reading in England. Ed. James Raven, Helen Small, and Naomi Tadmor. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

1.         Introduction: The Practice and Representation of Reading in England, by James Raven, Helen Small, and Naomi Tadmor, 1–21.

2.         “Let him read the satires of Horace”: Reading, Literacy, and Grammar in the Twelfth Century, by Suzanne Reynolds, 22–40.

3.         Into His Secret Chamber: Reading and Privacy in Late Medieval England, by Andrew Taylor, 41–61.

4.         The Place of Reading in the English Renaissance: John Dee Revisited, by William H. Sherman, 62–76.

5.         Reading and the Technology of Texual Affect: Erasmus’s Familiar Letters and Shakespeare’s King Lear, by Lisa Jardine, 77–101.

6.         The Editor as Reader: Constructing Renaissance Texts, by John Kerrigan, 102–24.

7.         Popular Verses and their Readership in the early Seventeenth Century, by Adam Fox, 125–37.

8.         The Physiology of Reading in Restoration England, by Adrian Johns, 138–61.

9.         “In the even my wife read to me”: Women, Reading and Household Life in the Eighteenth Century, by Naomi Tadmor, 162–74.

10.       From Promotion to Proscription: Arrangements for Reading in eighteenth-century Libraries, by James Raven, 175–201.

11.       Provincial Servants’ Reading in the late eighteenth century, by Jan Fergus, 202–25.

12.       Reconstructing the Reader: Prescriptions, Texts and Strategies in Anna Larpent’s Reading, by John Brewer, 226–45.

13.       Women, Men and the Reading of Vanity Fair, by Kate Flint, 246–62.

14.       A Pulse of 124: Charles Dickens and a Pathology of the mid-Victorian reading Public, 263–90.

 

Practices of Gender in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe. Ed. Megan Cassidy-Welch and Peter Sherlock. Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols, 2008.

1.         Introduction, by Megan Cassidy-Welch and Peter Sherlock, 1–6.

2.         Gender Theory and the Study of Early-Modern Europe, by Merry Wiesner-Hanks, 7–24.

3.         Pushing the Boundaries: Argula von Grumbach as a Lutheran Laywoman, 1492–1556/7, by Peter Matheson, 25–41.

4.         A Woman's Path to Literary: The Letters of Margherita Datini, 1384–1410, by Carolyn James, 43–56.

5.         Convent Culture in Early-Modern Italy: Laywomen and Religious Subversiveness in a Neapolitan Convent, by Camilla Russell, 57–76.

6.         Gender, Hybridity, and Violence on the Frontiers of Late-Medieval and Early-Modern Ireland, by Dianne Hall and Elizabeth Malcolm, 77–98.

7.         The Queen's Three Bodies: Gender, Criminality, and Sovereignty in the Execution of Mary, Queen of Scots, by Rayne Allinson, 99–116.

8.         The Royal Art of Conjugal Discord: A Satirical Double Portrait of Francis I and Eleanor of Austria, by Lisa Mansfield, 117–36.

9.         Engendering Lust in Early-Modern Italy: Pisanello's Luxuria, by Catherine Kovesi, 137–50.

10.       Cornelius Agrippa’s School of Love: Teaching Plato's Symposium at the Renaissance University, by Grantley Mcdonald, 151–76.

11.       “The richest man in Italy”: Aldo Manuzio and the Value of Male Friendships, by Rosa Salzberg, 177–98.

12.       Women, Work, and Power in the Female Guilds of Rouen, by Susan Broomhall, 199–214.

13.       Textile Workers, Gender, and the Organization of Production in the Pre-Industrial Dutch Republic, by Elise Van Nederveen Meerkerk, 215–34.

14.       Charitable Bodies: Clothing as Charity in Early-Modern Rural England, by Dolly Mackinnon, 235–60.

15.       Commemorating a Mortal Goddess: Maria Salviati de’ Medici and the Cultural Politics of Duke Cosimo I, by Natalie Tomas, 261–79.

16.       Patriarchal Memory: Monuments in Early-Modern England, by Peter Sherlock, 279–300.

17.       Agency, Women, and Witchcraft in Early-Modern England: Rye, 1607–11, by Elizabeth Kent, 301–16.

18.       Reflecting and Creating Gender in Late-Medieval and Early-Modern Europe, by Megan Cassidy-Welch and Peter Sherlock, 317–25.

 

A Princely Brave Woman: Essays on Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle. Ed. Stephen Clucas. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2003.

1.         Introduction, by Stephen Clucas, 1–17.

I.          Prose Fictions

2.         Contracting Readers: “Margaret Newcastle” and the Rhetoric of Conjugality, by Kate Lilley, 19–39.

3.         “How great is thy change”: Familial Discourses in the Cavendish Family, by Marion Wynne-Davies, 40–50.

4.         “Of Mixt Natures”: Questions of Genre in Margaret Cavendish’s The Blazing World, by Nicole Pohl, 51–68.

5.         Autobiography, Parody and the Sociable Letters of Margaret Cavendish, by James Fitzmaurice, 69–84.

II.        Drama

6.         Writing for the Brain and Writing for the Boards: The Producibility ofMargaret Cavendish’s Dramatic Texts, by Judith Peacock, 87–108.

7.         “Making a Spectacle”: Margaret Cavendish and the Staging of the Self, by Rebecca D’Monté, 109–26.

8.         “The Closet Opened”: A Reconstruction of “Private Space” in the Writings of Margaret Cavendish, by Julie Sanders, 127–40.

III.       Poetry

9.         Imagining the Mind: Cavendish’s Hobbesian Allegories, by Jay Stevenson, 143–55.

10.       Margaret Cavendish’s Poems and Fancies and Thomas Harriot’s Treatise on Infinity, by B. J. Sokol, 156–70.

11.       A Well-Spun Yarn: Margaret Cavendish and Homer’s Penelope, by Emma L. E. Rees, 171–82.

IV.       Natural Philosophy

12.       Margaret Cavendish and Henry Moore, by Sarah Hutton, 185–98.

13.       Variation, Irregularity and Probabilism: Margaret Cavendish and Natural Philosophy as Rhetoric, by Stephen Clucas, 199–209.

14.       Margaret Cavendish, the Doctors of Physick and Advice to the Sick, by Susan Fitzmaurice, 210–41.

15.       Paradigms and Politics: Hobbes and Cavendish Contrasted, by Neil Ankers, 242–53.

 

Printing and Parenting in Early Modern England. Ed. Douglas A. Brooks. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2005.

Introduction, by Douglas A. Brooks, 1–26.

I.          Reproductive Rhetorics

1.         Imprints: Shakespeare, Gutenberg, and Descartes, by Margreta de Grazia, 29–58

2.         Meaning, “Seeing,” Printing, by Anne Thompson and John O. Thompson, 59–86.

II.        Ink and Kin

3.         A Womb of His Own: Male Renaissance Poets in the Female Body, by Katharine Eisaman Maus, 89–108.

4.         Ben Jonson’s Branded Thumb and the Imprint of Textual Paternity, by Lynne Dickson Bruckner, 109–30.

5.         All Father: Ben Jonson and the Psychodynamics of Authorship, by David Lee Miller, 131–48.

III.       Issues of the Book Trade

6.         The Bastard Art: Woodcut Illustration in Sixteenth-Century England, by James A. Knapp, 151–72.

7.         Promiscuous Textualities: The Nashe-Harvey Controversy and the Unnatural Productions of Print, by Maria Teresa Micaela Prendergast, 173–96.

8.         The Birth of Advertising, by Michael Baird Saenger, 197–220.

9.         Printing Bastards: Monstrous Birth Broadsides in Early Modern England, by Aaron W. Kitch, 221–36.

10.       “Red Incke”: Reading and Bleeding on the Early Modern Page, by Bianca F. C. Calabresi, 237–64.

IV.       Parental Authorities

11.       Marginal Maternity: Reading Lady Anne Clifford’s A Mirror for Magistrates, by Stephen Orgel, 267–90.

12.       Checking the Father: Anxious Paternity and Jacobean Press Censorship, by Cyndia Susan Clegg, 191–302.

13.       Pater patriae: James I and the Imprint of Prerogative, by Howard Marchitello, 303–24.

V.        Textual Legacies

14.       How many children had Alice Walker? by Laurie E. Maguire, 327–50.

15.       Mothers and Authors: Johnson vs. Calvert and the New Children of Our Imagination, by Mark Rose, 351–70.

16.       In Locus Parentis, by Judith Roof, 371–94.

Afterword, by Jennifer Wynn Hellwarth, 395–401.

 

Privacy, Domesticity, and Women in Early Modern England. Ed. Corinne Abate. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2003.

1.         Introduction: Indistinguished Space, by Elizabeth Mozzola and Corine Abate, 1–18.

I.          “Concealing Continents”: Settings for Intimacy and Domesticity

2.         With the Skin Side Inside: The Interiors of the Duchess of Malfi, by Lisa Hopkins, 21–30.

3.         Neither a Tamer nor a Shrew Be: A Defense of Petruchio and Katherine, by Corinne Abate, 31–44.

4.         “Wounds still curelesse”: Estates of Loss in Mary Wroth’s Urania, by Kathryn Pratt, 45–62.

II.        “Hospitable Favors”: Rituals of the Household

5.         Trafficking in John Ford’s The Broken Heart, by Nancy A. Gutierrez, 65–82.

6.         Good Enough to Eat: The Domestic Economy of Women—Woman Eroticism in Margaret Cavendish and Andrew Marvell, 83–110.

7.         “Thy weaker Novice to perform thy will”: Female Dominion over Male Identity in The Faerie Queene, by Catherine G. Cannino, 111–28.

III.       “Scanted Courtesies”: Family Dynamics and Dispositions

8.         “Natural Boys” and “Hard Stepmothers”: Sidney and Elizabeth, by Elizabeth Mazzola, 131–50.

9.         Mystical Sororities: The Power of Supernatural Female Narratives in Lady Mary Wroth’s Urania, by Sheila T. Cavanaugh, 151–66.

10.       Looking for Goneril and Regan, by Cristina León Alfar, 167–97.

 

Privileging Gender in Early Modern England. Ed. Jean R. Brink. Sixteenth Century Essays and Studies, volume XXIII. Kirksville, MO: Northeast Missouri State University Press, 1993.

Introduction, by Jean R. Brink, 1–4.

1.         The Books and Lives of Three Tudor Women, by Mary Erler, 5–18.

2.         "Unlock my lipps": the Miserere mei Deus of Anne Vaughan Lok and Mary Sidney Herbert, Countess of Pembroke, by Margaret P. Hannay, 19–37.

3.         Historical Difference/ Sexual Difference, by Phyllis Rackin, 38–64.

4.         The Taming-School: The Taming of the Shrew as Lesson in Renaissance Humanism, by Margaret Downs-Gamble, 65–80.

5.         An Intertextual Study of Volumnia: From Legend to Character in Shakespeare's Coriolanus, by Catherine La Courreye Blecki, 81–92.

6.         Domesticating the Dark Lady, by Jean R. Brink, 93–108.

7.         Forming the Commonwealth: Including, Excluding, and Criminalizing Women in Heywood’s Edward IV and Shakespeare’s Henry IV, by Jean E. Howard, 109–22.

8.         Private and Public: The Boundaries of Women's Lives in Early Stuart England, by Retha M. Warnicke, 123–40.

9.         Resurrecting the Author: Elizabeth Tanfield Cary, by Donald W. Foster, 141–74.

10.       Dictionary English and the Female Tongue, by Juliet Fleming, 175–204.

11.       Re-Gendering Individualism: Margaret Fell Fox and Quaker Rhetoric, by Judith Kegan Gardiner, 205–24.

12.       “Marrying that Hated Object”: The Carnival of Desire in Behn’s The Rover, by Mark S. Lussier, 225–340.

 

Reading Mary Wroth: Representing Alternatives in Early Modern England. Ed. Naomi J. Miller and Gary Waller. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1991.

Introduction: Reading as Re-Vision, by Naomi J. Miller and Gary Waller, 1–13.

I.          Family Bonds

1.         “Your vertuous and learned Aunt”: The Countess of Pembroke as a Mentor to Mary Wroth, by Margaret P. Hannay, 15–34.

2.         Mary Wroth and the Sidney Family Romance: Gender Construction in Early Modern England, by Gary Waller, 15–65.

II.        Con / Texts

3.         “Shall I turne blabb?”: Circulation, Gender, and Subjectivity in Mary Wroth’s Sonnets, by Jeff Masten, 67–87.

4.         Mary Wroth’s Love’s Victory and Pastoral Tragicomedy, by Barbara K. Lewalski, 88–108.

5.         “The Knott Never to Bee Untide”: The Controversy Regarding Marriage in Mary Wroth’s Urania, by Josephine A. Roberts, 109–33.

III.       Rewriting the Renaissance

6.         Designing Women: The Self as Spectacle in Mary Wroth and Veronica Franco, by Ann Rosalind Jones, 135–53.

7.         Engendering Discourse: Women’s Voices in Wroth’s Urania and Shakespeare’s Plays, by Naomi J. Miller, 154–73.

IV.       In Different Voices

8.         Mary Wroth and the Invention of Female Poetic Subjectivity, by Nona Fienberg, 175–90.

9.         Theatricality and Female Identity in Mary Wroth’s Urania, by Heather L. Weidemann, 191–209.

10.       Women Readers in Mary Wroth’s Urania, by Mary Ellen Lamb, 210–27.

 

Readings in Renaissance Women’s Drama: Criticism, History, and Performance, 1594–1998. Ed. S. P. Cerasano and Marian Wynne Davies. New York: Routledge, 1998.

Introduction, by S. P. Cerasano and Marian Wynne Davies, 1–5.

I.          Early Commentaries

Introduction, 9

1.         Mary Sidney is praised to Elizabeth (1594), 10

2.         Samuel Daniel to Mary Sidney, 10

3.         John Davies of Hereford Commends Mary Sidney and Elizabeth Cary (1612), 13

4.         William Shears to Elizabeth Cary (1633), 14

5.         Jonson and Wroth (1640), 15

6.         Elizabeth Cary’s Biography (1643–49), 16

7.         Celebrating Several Ladies (1752), 16

8.         The Cavalier’s Lady and her Plays (1872), 18

9.         The First Scholarly Edition of Mary Sidney’s Antonie (1897), 18

10.       Lumley’s Play First Published (1909), 18

11.       The First Modern Edition of Mariam (1914), 19

12.       Early Critical Recognition of Elizabeth Cary and Margaret Cavendish (1920), 20

13.       Woolf on Margaret Cavendish (1925), 21

14.       T. S. Eliot on Senecan Drama (1927), 21

15.       Virginia Woolf on “Judith Shakespeare” (1929), 23

16.       The First Edition of The Concealed Fancies (1931), 24

17.       Cary and “A Woman’s Duty” (1940), 26

18.       Mary Sidney: Philip’s Sister (1957), 27

II.        Contexts and Issues, 29

Introduction, 31

1.         Women Playwrights in England, Renaissance Noblewomen, by Nancy Cotton, 32–46.

2.         The Arts at the English Court of Anna of Denmark, by Leeds Barroll, 47–59.

3.         “My seeled chamber and dark parlous room”: The English Country House and and Renaissance Women Dramatists, by Marion Wynne Davies, 69–68.

4.         Women as Patrons of English Renaissance Drama, by David M. Bergeron, 69–80.

5.         Women as Spectators, Spectacles, and Paying Customers, by Jean E. Howard, 81–86.

6.         Women as Theatrical Investors: Three Shareholders and the Second Fortune Playhouse, by S. P. Cerasano, 87–94.

7.         “Why may not a lady write a good play”: Plays by Early Modern Women Reassessed as Performance Texts, by Gweno Williams, 95–106.

III.       Early Modern Women Dramatists, 109

Introduction, 111

Elizabeth I:

1.         “We Princes I tell you, are set on stages”: Elizabeth I and Dramatic Self-Representation, by Carole Levin, 113–24.

Jane/Joanna Lumley

2.         Joanna Lumley (1537?–1576/77), by Elaine V. Beilin, 125–28.

3.         Jane Lumley’s Iphigenia at Aulis: multum in parvo, or, less is more, by Stephanie Hodgson Wright, 129–41.

Mary Sidney

4.         “Patronesse of the Muses,” by Margaret P. Hannay, 142–55.

5.         Mary Herbert: Englishing a Purifies Cleopatra, by Tina Krontiris, 156–66.

Elizabeth Cary

6.         Elizabeth Cary (1585–1639), by Elaine V. Beilin, 167–81.

7.         The Specter of Resistance: The Tragedy of Mariam (1613), by Margaret W. Ferguson, 182–93.

8.         Resisting Tyrants: Elizabeth Cary’s Tragedy, by Barbara Kiefer Lewalski, 194–218.

Mary Wroth

9.         An Unknown Continent: Lady Mary Wroth’s Forgotten Pastoral Drama “Loves Victorie”, by Barbara Ann McLaren , 219–33.

10.       “Like one in a gay masque”: The Sidney Cousins in the Theaters of Court and Country, by Gary Waller, 234–45)

Jane Cavendish and Elizabeth Brackley

11.       “To be your daughter in your pen”: The Social Functions of Literature in the Writings of Lady Elizabeth Brackley and Lady Jane Cavendish, by Margaret J. M. Ezell, 246–58.

12.       “She gave you the civility of the house”: Household performance in The Concealed Fancies, by Alison Findlay, 259–71.

Margaret Cavendish

13.       “My brain the stage”: Margaret Cavendish and the Fantasy of Female Performance, by Sophie Tomlinson, 272–92.

14.       “A woman write a play!”: Jonsonian Strategies and the Dramatic Writings of Margaret Cavendish; or, did the duchess feel the anxiety of influence? by Julie Sanders, 293–305.


The Reception of Christine de Pizan from the Fifteenth through the Nineteenth Centuries: Visitors to the City. Ed. Glenda K. McLeod, 1991.

1.         Antoine de la Salle, Reader of Christine de Pizan, by Charity C. Willard, 1–10.

2.         A Case of Faulx Semblans: L’Epistre au Dieu d’Amours and The Letter of Cupid, by Glenda K. McLeod, 11–24.

3.         Christine de Pizan’s Book of War, by Frances Teague, 25–41.

4.         The Intellectual Circle of Isabel of Portugal, Duchess of Burgundy, and the Portuguese Translation of Le Livre des Trois Vertus (O Liuro dos Tres Vertudes), 43–58.

5.         Anne de France, Reader of Christine de Pizan, by Charity C. Willard, 59–70.

6.         Marguerite de Navarre as Reader of Christine de Pizan, by Paula Sommers, 71–82.

7.         The Boke of the Cyte of Ladyes and its Sixteenth-Century Readership, by John Rooks, 83–100.

8.         The Medieval femme auteur as a Provocation to Literary History: Eighteenth-Century Readers of Christine de Pizan, by Earl Jeffrey Edwards, 101–26.

 

Reclaiming Female Agency: Feminist Art History after Postmodernism. Ed. Norma Broude and Mary D. Garrard. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2005.

Introduction: Reclaiming Female Agency, by Norma Broude and Mary D. Garrard, 1–26.

1.         Here’s Looking at Me: Sofonisba Anguissola and the Problem of the Woman Artist, by Mary D. Garrard, 27–48.

2.         Learning to Be Looked At: A Portrait of (the Artist as) a Young Woman in Agnes Merlet’s Artemisia, by Sheila ffolliott, 49–62.

3.         Artemisia’s Hand, by Mary D. Garrard, 63–80.

4.         The Antique Heroines of Elisabetta Sirani, by Babette Bohn, 81–100.

5.         Pictures Fit for a Queen: Peter Paul Rubens and the Marie de’ Medici Cycle, by Geraldine A. Johnson, 101–20.

6.         The Portrait of the Queen: Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun’s Marie-Antoinette en chemise, by Mary D. Sheriff, 121–42.

7.         Depoliticizing Women: Female Agency, the French Revolution, and the Art of Boucher and David by Erica Rand, 143–58.

8.         Nudity a la grecque in 1799, by Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby, 159–86.

9.         A Woman's Pleasure: Ingres’s Grande Odalisque, by Carol Ockman, 187–202.

10.       Conduct Unbecoming: Daumier and Les Bas-Bleus, by Janis Bergman-Carton, 203–16.

11.       The Gendering of Impressionism, by Norma Broude, 217–34.

12.       Selling, Seduction, and Soliciting the Eye: Manet's Bar at the Folies-Bergere, by Ruth E. Iskin, 235–58.

13.       Mary Cassatt: Modern Woman or the Cult of True Womanhood? by Norma Broude, 259–76.

14.       The “Strength of the Weak” as Portrayed by Marie Laurencin, by Bridget Elliott, 277–300.

15.       New Encounters with Les Demoiselles d’Avignon: Gender, Race, and the Origins of Cubism, by Anna C. Chave, 301–24.

16.       The New Woman in Hannah Hoch’s Photomontages: Issues of Androgyny, Bisexuality, and Oscillation, by Maud Lavin, 325–42.

17.       Claude Cahun, Marcel Moore, and the Collaborative Construction of a Lesbian Subjectivity, by Julie Cole, 343–60.

18.       Louise Bourgeois's Femmes-Maisons: Confronting Lacan, by Julie Nicoletta, 361–72.

19.       Reconsidering the Stain: On Gender and the Body in Helen Frankenthaler's Painting, by Lisa Saltzman, 373–84.

20.       Minimalism and Biography, by Anna C. Chave, 385–408.

21.       The “Sexual Politics” of The Dinner Party: A Critical Context, by Amelia Jones, 409–34.

22.       Cultural Collisions: Identity and History in the Work of Hung Liu, by Allison Arieff, 435–46.

23.       Shirin Neshat: Double Vision, by John B. Ravenal, 447–58.

 

Recovering Spain’s Feminist Tradition. Ed. Lisa Vollendorf. New York: MLA, 2001.  [Nineteenth- and twentieth-century essays are omitted.]

Introduction, by Lisa Vollendorf, 1–29.

I.          Medieval and Early Modern Periods (Fifteenth through Seventeenth Century)

1.         The Critics and Florencia Pinar: The Problem with Assigning Feminism to a Medieval Court Poet, by Barbara F. Weissberger, 31–47.

2.         Feminist Attitudes and Expression in Golden Age Spain: From Teresa de Jesús to María de Guevara, by María Isabel Barbeito Carneiro, 48–68.

3.         The Partial Feminism of Ana de San Bartolomé, by Alison Weber, 69–87.

4.         Juana and her Sisters: Female Sexuality and Spirituality in Early Modern Spain and the New World, byAnne J. Cruz, 88–102.

5.         “No Doubt It Will Amaze You”: María de Zayas’s Early Modern Feminism, by Lisa Vollendorf, 103–21.

II.        Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries

6.         Playing with Saint Isabel: Drama from the Pen of an Unknown Adolescent, by Teresa S. Soufas with 12 others, 123–41.

7.         Constructing Her Own Tradition: Ideological Selectivity in Josefa Amar y Borbón’s Representtion of Female Models, by Constance A. Sullivan, 142–59.

8.         Becoming “Angelic”: María Pilar Sinués and the Woman Question, by María Cristina Urruela, 160–75.

9.         Rosalía de Castro: Cultural Isolation in a Colonial Context, by Catherine Davies, 176–97.

 

Refiguring Woman: Perspectives on Gender and the Italian Renaissance. Ed. Marilyn Migiel and Juliana Schiesari. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1991.

Introduction, by Marilyn Migiel and Juliana Schiesari, 1–16.

I.          The Hermeneutics of Gender

1.         Inter Musam et ursam moritur: Folingo and the Gaping “Other” Mouth, by Barbara Spackman, 19–34.

2.         Patriarchal Ideology in the Renaissance Iconography of Judith, by Elena Ciletti, 35–70.

3.         The Visual Language of Gender in Sixteenth-Century Garden Sculpture, by Claudia Lazzaro, 71–113.

4.         Chastity on the Page: A Feminist Use of Paleography, by Stephanie H. Jed, 114–30.

II.        The Political Economy of Gender

5.         “The Most Serious Duty”: Motherhood, Gender, and Patrician Culture in Renaissance Venice, by Stanley Chojnacki, 133–54.

6.         Funerals and the Politics of Gender in Early Renaissance Florenc, by Sharon T. Strocchia, 155–68.

7.         No Longer Virgins: Self-Presentation by Young Women in Late Renaissance Rome, by Elizabeth S. Cohen, 169–91.

8.         Economy, Woman, and Renaissance Discourse, by Carla Freccero, 192–209.

III.       Woman and the Canon

9.         The Dignity of Man: A Feminist Perspective, by MarilynMigiel, 211–32.

10.       The Gendering of Melancholia: Torquato Tasso and Isabella di Morra, by Juliana Schiesari, 233–62.

11.       New Songs for the Swallow: Ovid’s Philomela in Tullia d’Aragona and Gaspara Stampa, by Ann Rosalind Jones, 263–77.

 

Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan. Ed. Earl Jeffrey Richards, with Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1992.

I.          Christine and the Beginnings of Feminist Thought

1.         The Representation and Functions of Feminine Speech in Christine de Pizan’s Livre des Trois Vertus, by Liliane Dulac (trans. by Christine Reno), 13–22.

2.         Did Christine Have a Sense of Humor? The Evidence of the Epistre au dieu d’Amours, by Thelma Fenster, by 23–36.

3.         Poetics and Antimisogynist Polemics in Christine de Pizan’s Le Livre de la Cité des Dames, by Glenda McLeod, 37–47.

4.         Christine de Pizan’s Livre de la Cité des Dames: The Reconstruction of Myth, by Eleni Stecopoulos with Karl D. Uitti, 48–62.

5.         Fathers and Daughters: Christine de Pizan as Reader of the Male Tradition of Clergie in the Dit de la Rose, by Lori Walters, 63–76.

6.         A Mirror for Misogynists: John of Salisbury’s Policraticus (8.11) in the Translation of Denis Foulechat (1372), by Eric Hicks, 77–107.

II.        Christine and Medieval French Literature

7.         Elegant Closures: The use of the Diminutive in Christine de Pizan and jean de Meun, by Naida Margolis, 111–23.

8.         Stylistic Conventions in Le Livre de la Mutacion de Fortune, by Jeanette M. A. Beer, 124–36.

9.         Reopening the Case: Machaut’s Jugement Poems as a Source in Christine de Pizan, by Barbara K. Altmann, 137–56.

10.       “La Pioche d’Inquisicion”: Legal-Judicial Content and Style in Christine de Pizan’s Livre de la Cité des Dames, by Maureen Cheney Curnow, 157–72.

11.       Christine de Pizan and Antoine de la Sale: The Dangers of Love in Theory and Fiction, by Allison Kelly, 173–86.

III.       Christine between the Church Fathers and the Humanists

12.       Compilation and Legitimation in the Fifteenth Century: Le Livre de la Cité des Dames, by Joël Blanchard, trans. Earl Jeffrey Richards, 228–49.

13.       Christine de Pizan, the Conventions of Courtly Diction, and Italian Humanism, by Earl Jeffrey Richards, 250–71.

 

Renaissance Bodies: The Human Figure in English Culture, c.1540–1660. Ed. Lucy Gent and Nigel Llewellyn. London: Reaktion Books, 1990.

Introduction, by Lucy Gent and Nigel Llewellyn, 1–10.

1.         Icons of Divinity: Portraits of Elizabeth I, by Andrew Belsey and Catherine Belsey, 11–35.

2.         Lady Elizabeth Pope: The Heraldic Body, by Ellen Chirelstein, 36–59.

3.         In Memory: Lady Dacre and Pairing  by Hans Eworth, by Elizabeth Honig, 60–85.

4.         “Magnetic Figures”: Polemical Prints of the English Revolution, by Tamsyn Williams, 86–110.

5.         The Fate of Marsyas: Dissecting the Renaissance Body, by Jonathan Sawday, 111–35.

6.         The Rhetoric of Status: Gesture, Demeanour and the Image of the Gentleman in Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century England, by Anna Bryson, 136–53.

7.         Inigo Jones as a Figurative Artists, by John Peacock, 154–80.

8.         ‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore Representing the Incestuous Body, by Susan J. Wiseman, 180–97.

9.         Self-Fashioning and the Classical Moment in Mid-Sixteenth-Century English Architecture, by Maurice Howard, 198–217.

10.       The Royal Body: Monuments to the Dead, For the Living, by Nigel Llewellyn, 218–40.

Notes, 241–82.

 

The Renaissance Englishwoman in Print: Counterbalancing the Canon. Ed. Anne M. Haselkorn and Betty Travitsky. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1990.

Introduction: Placing Women in the English Renaissance, 3–42.

I.          The Outspoken Woman

1.         Counterattacks on “the Bayter of Women”: Three Pamphleteers of the Early Seventeenth Century, by Ann Rosalind Jones, 45–62.

2.         The Power of Integrity in Massinger’s Women, by Ira Clark, 63–79.

3.         “Maydes are simple, some men say”: Thomas Campion’s Female Persona Poems, by Gail Reitenbach, 80–96.

II.        Women on the Renaissance Stage

4.         “Strike all that look upon with mar[b]le”: Monumentalizing Women in Shakespeare’s Plays, by Abbe Blum, 99–118.

5.         Sin and the Politics of Penitence: Three Jacobean Adulteresses, by Anne M. Haselkorn, 119–36.

6.         Style and Gender in Elizabeth Cary’s Edward II, by Tina Krontiris, 137–54.

III.       The Woman Ruler

7.         Representing Political Androgyny: More on the Siena Portrait of Queen Elizabeth, by Constance Jordan, 157–76.

8.         The Queen’s Two Bodies and the Divided Emperor: Some Problems of Identity in Antony and Cleopatra, by Clare Kinney, 177–86.

9.         Radigund Revisited: Perspectives on Women Rulers in Lady Mary Wroth’s Urania, by Josephine A. Roberts, 187–208.

IV.       The Private Woman

10.       Griselda, Renaissance Woman, by Judith Bronfman, 211–23.

11.       Puritan Preaching and the Politics of the Family, by R. Valerie Lucas, 224–40.

12.       “His wife’s prayers and meditations”: MS Egerton 607, by Betty S. Travitsky, 241–60.

V.        Women and the Sidneian Tradition

13.       “To the Angell Spirit”: Mary Sidney’s Entry into the “World of Words,” by Beth Wynne Fiskin, 263–75.

14.       An Unknown Continent: Lady Mary Wroth’s forgotten Pastoral Drama Loves Victorie, by Margaret Anne McLaren, 276–94.

15.       Rewriting Lyric Fictions: The Role of the Lady in Lady Mary Wroth’s Pamphilia to Amphilanthus, by Naomi J. Miller, 295–310.

16.       Feminine Endings: The Sexual Politics of Sidney’s and Spenser’s Rhyming, by Maureen Quilligan, 311–26.

17.       The Countess of Pembroke and Gendered Reading, by Gary Waller, 327–46.

18.       Current Bibliography of English Women Writers 1500–1640, by Elaine V. Beilin, 347–60.

 

Renaissance Women Writers: French Texts/American Contexts. Ed. Anne R. Larsen and Colette H. Winn. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1994.

Introduction, by Anne R. Larsen and Colette H. Winn, 11–20.

I.          Coming to Writing: Women’s Exclusionary and Revisionary Practices

1.         Women Addressing Women: The Differentiated Text, by Deborah N. Losse, 23–37.

2.         Poolside Transformations: Diana and Actaeon Revisited by French Renaissance Women Lyricists, by Kirk D. Read, 38–54.

3.         Catherine des Roches’s La Ravissement de Proserpine: A Humanist/Feminist Translation, by Tilde Sankovitch, 55–66.

4.         Marguerite de Valois and the Problematics of Female Self-Representation, by Patricia Francis Cholakian, 67–82.

II.        Writing the Body and the Poetics of Feminine Desire

5.         Louise Labé: The Mysterious Case of the Body in the Text, by Paula Sommers, 85–98.

6.         “Trop en corps”: Marguerite de Navarre and the Transgressive Body, by Collette H. Winn, 99–114.

7.         Carpe Diem, Poetic Immortality, and the Gendered Ideology of Time, by CathyYandell, 115–29.

8.         Patriarchy and the Maternal Text: The Case of Marguerite de Navarre, by Carla Freccero, 130–40.

III.       Literary Camouflages and the Politics of Reception

9.         Gendered Oppositions in Marguerite de Navarre’s Heptameron: The Rhetoric of Seduction and Resistance in Narrative and Society, by Gary Ferguson, 143–59.

10.       Engendering Letters: Louise Labé Polygraph, by Tom Conley, 160–71.

11.       Chastity and the Mother-Daughter Bond: Odet de Turnèbe’s Response to Catherine des Roches, 172–88.

12.       Les Puissances de Vostre Empire: Changing Power Relations in Marie de Gournay’s Le Proumenoir de Monsieur de Montaigne from 1594 to 1626, by Cathleen M. Bauschatz, 189–207.

 

The Representation of Women’s Emotions in Medieval and Early Modern Culture. Ed. Lisa Perfetti. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2005.

Introduction, by Lisa Perfetti, 1–22.

1.         Theories of the Passions and the Ecstasies of Late Medieval Religious Women, by E. Ann Matter, 23–42.

2.         The Allegorical Construction of Female Feeling and Forma: Gender, Diabolism, and Personification in Hildegard of Bingen’s Ordo Virtutumby James J. Paxson, 43–62.

3.         The Spiritual Role of the Emotions in Mechthild of Magdeburg, Angela of Foligno, and Teresa of Avila, by Elena Carrera, 63–89.

4.         “Us for to wepe no man may lett”: Resistant Female Grief in the Medieval English Lazarus Plays, by Katharine Goodland, 90–118.

5.         Constant Sorrow: Emotions and the Women Trouveres, by Wendy Pfeffer, 119–32.

6.         A Pugnacious Pagan Princess: Aggressive Female Anger and Violence in Fierabras, by Kristi Gourlay, 133–63.

7.         Calefurnia’s Rage: Emotions and Gender in Late Medieval Law and Literature, by Sarah Westphal, 164–90.

8.         Waxing Red: Shame and the Body, Shame and the Soul, by Valerie Allen, 191–210.

 

Representing Women in Renaissance England. Ed. Claude J. Summers and Ted-Larry Pebworth. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1997.

Introduction, by Claude J. Summers and Ted-Larry Pebworth, 1–8.

1.         “My Soule in silence”? Devotional Representations of Renaissance Englishwomen, 9–23.

2.         Complications of Intertextuality: John Fisher, Katherine Parr, and “The Books of the Crucifix”, 24–41.

3.         Translating Italian Thought about Women in Elizabethan England: Harington’s Orlando Furioso, by Pamela Joseph Benson, 42–58.

4.         Women and Magic in English Renaissance Love Poetry, by Gareth Roberts, 59–75.

5.         Women in the Lyric Dialogue of Courtship: Whitney’s Admonition to al yong Gentilwomen and Donne’s”The Legacie”, by Ilona Bell, 76–92.

6.         Donne’s Incarnate Muse and His Claim to Poetic Control in “Sapho to Philaenis”, by Cecilia Infante, 93–106.

7.         Witches, King James and the Masque of Queens, by Lawrence Normand, 107–20.

8.         Aemilia Lanyer and the Pathos of Literary History, by Judith Scherer Herz, 121–35.

9.         Female Text, Male Reader Response: Contemporary Marginalia in Rachel Speght’s A Mouzell for Melastomus, by Barbara K. Lewalski, 136–62.

10.       Deciphering Women’s Pastoral: Coded Language in Wroth’s Love’s Victory, by Josephine A. Roberts, 163–74.

11.       Deference and Defiance: The “Memorandum” of Martha Moulsworth, by Robert C. Evans, 175–86.

12.       Richard Crashaw, Mary Collet, and the “Arminian Nunnery” of Little Gidding, by Paul A. Parrish, 187–200.

13.       Robert Herrick’s Housekeeper: Representing Ordinary Women in Renaissance Poetry, by Roger B. Rollin, 201–15.

14.       An Collins and the Experience of Defeat, by Sidney Gottlieb, 216–26.

15.       Katherine Philips, Aphra Behn, and the Female Pindaric, by Stella P. Revard, 227–41.

 

Rereading Aphra Behn: History, Theory, and Criticism. Ed. Heidi Hutner. Charlottesville:  University Press of Virginia, 1993.

Rereading Aphra Behn: An Introduction, by Heidi Hutner, 1–13.

I.          Beginnings and Endings

1.         Aphra Behn and the Ideological Construction of Restoration Literary Theory, by Laurie Finke, 17–43.

2.         “Good, Sweet, Honey, Sugar-Candied Reader”: Aphra Behn’s Foreplay in Forewords, by Jessica Munns, 44–62.

II.        Drama

3.         Who Was That Masked Woman? The Prostitute and the Playwright in the Comedies of Aphra Behn, by Catherine Gallagher, 65–85.

4.         “Deceit, Dissembling, all that’s Woman”: Comic Plot and Female Action in The Feigned Courtesans, by Jane Spencer, 86–101.

5.         Revisioning the Female Body: Aphra Behn’s The Rover, Parts I and II, by Heidi Hutner, 102–20.

6.         Semiotic Modalities of the Female Body in Aphra Behn’s The Dutch Lover, by Susan Green, 121–47.

III.       Fiction

7.         Beyond Incest: Gender and the Politics of Transgression in Aphra Behn’s Love-Letters between a Nobleman and His Sister, by Ellen Pollak, 151–86.

8.         “Pretences of State”: Aphra Behn and the Female Plot, by Ros Ballaster, 187–211.

9.         The Other Problem with Women: Reproduction and Slave Culture in Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko, by Charlotte Sussman, 212–33.

10.       The History of The History of the Nun, by Jacqueline Pearson, 234–52.

11.       Aphra Behn’s Love: Fiction, Letters, and Desire, by Ruth Salvaggio, 253–70

IV.       Poetry

12.       Liberty, Equality, Fraternity: Utopian Longings in Behn’s Lyric Poetry, by Judith Kegan Gardiner, 273–300.

13.       Contestations of Nature: Aphra Behn’s “The Golden Age” and the Sexualizing of Politics, by Robert Markely and Molly Rothenberg, 301–22..

 

Resurrecting Elizabeth I in Seventeenth-Century England. Ed. Elizabeth H. Hageman and Katherine Conway. Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2007. [DA355.R47 2007]

Chronology (p. 9)

Introduction, by Elizabeth H. Hageman, 15–30.

1.         “Almost always smiling”: Elizabeth's Last Two Years, by Katherine Duncan-Jones, 31–47.

2.         “Tongue-tied our Queen?”: Queen Elizabeth's Voice in the Seventeenth Century, by Steven W. May, 48–67.

3.         The Phoenix Reborn: The Jacobean Appropriation of an Elizabethan Symbol, by Alan R. Young, 68–81.

4.         Re-Membering Gloriana: The Revenger's Tragedy, by Peter Hyland, 82–94.

5.         “Her burning face, Declines apace”: Ben Jonson and the Specter of Elizabeth, by Hardin L. Aasand, 95–110.

6.         A Second Phoenix: The Rebirth of Elizabeth I in Elizabeth Stuart, by Georgianna Ziegler, 111–31.

7.         Forgetting Elizabeth in Henry VIII, by Jonathan Baldo 132–48.

8.         “Elizian” Fields: Elizabeth, Essex, and the Politics of Dissent in 1624, by Elizabeth Pentland, 149–67.

9.         Representing the “Phoenix Queen”: Elizabeth I in Writings by Anna Maria van Schurman and Anne Bradstreet, by Lisa Gim, 168–84.

10.       Bonum Theatrale: The Matter of Elizabeth I in Francis Bacon’s Of Tribute and Margaret Cavendish's Blazing World by Brandie R. Siegfried, 185–204.

11.       Unpropping the Princess: John Banks's Revision of Shakespeare's Elizabeth, by Kim H. Noling, 205–19.

12.       “Take from me first the softness of a Woman”: Rewriting Elizabeth’s Execution of Mary Stuart during the Seventeenth-Century Succession Crisis, by Erika Mae Olbricht, 220–38.

13.       Re-Sounding Elizabeth in Seventeenth-Century Music: Morley to Purcell, by Leslie C. Dunn, 239–60.

14.       “Is there any harme in that?”: Foxe, Heywood, and Shekhar Kapur’s Elizabeth, by Susanne L. Wofford, 261–77.

 

Rewriting the Renaissance: The Discourses of Sexual Difference in Early Modern Europe. Ed. Margaret Ferguson, Maureen Quilligan, and Nancy J. Vickers. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987.

Introduction, by Ferguson, Quilligan, and Vickers, xv–xxxi.

I.          The Politics of Patriarchy: Theory and Practice

1.         Fatherly Authoritiy: The Politics of Stuart Family Images, by Jonathan Goldbert, 3–32.

2.         The Absent Mother in King Lear, by Coppélia Kahn, 33–49.

3.         Prospero’s Wife, by Stephen Orgel, 50–64.

4.         A Midsummer Night’s Dream and the Shaping Fantasies of Elizabethan Culture: Gender, Power, Form, by Louis A. Montrose, 65–87.

5.         Puritanism and Maenadism in A Mask, by Richard Halpern, 88–105.

6.         Dalila’s House: Samson Agonistes and the Sexual Division of Labor, by John Guillory, 106–22.

7.         Patriarchal Territories: The Body Encloses, by Peter Stallybrass, 123–42.

II.        The Rhetorics of Marginalization: Consequences of Patriarchy

8.         The Other and the Same: The Image of the Hermaphrodite in Rabelais, by Carla Freccero, 145–58.

9.         Usurpation, Seduction, and the Problematics of the Proper: A “Deconstructive,” “feminine” Rereading of the Seductions of Richard and Anne in Shakespear’s Richard III, by Marguerite Waller, 159–74.

10.       The Beauty of Woman: Problems in the Rhetoric of Renaissance Portraiture, by Elizabeth Cropper, 175–90.

11.       Spinsters and Seamstresses: Women in Cloth and Clothing Production, by Merry E. Wiesner, 191–205.

12.       A Woman’s Place was in the Home: Women’s Work in Renaissance Tuscany, by Judith C. Brown, 206–24.

III.       The Works of Women: Some exceptions to the Rule of Patriarchy

13.       Cathereine de’ Medici as Artemisia: Figuring the Powerful Widow, by Sheils ffolliott, 227–41.

14.       Feminism and the Humanists: The Case for Sir Thomas Elyot’s Defense of Good Women, by Constance Jordan, 242–58.

15.       Singing Unsung Heroines: Androgynous Discourse in Book 3 of The Faerie Queene, by Lauren Silberman, 259–71.

16.       Stella’s Wit: Penelope Rich as Reader of Sidney’s Sonnets, by Clark Hulse, 272–86.

17.       Gender vs. Sex Difference in Louise Labé’s Grammar of Love, by François Rigolot, 287–98

18.       City Women and Their Audiences: Louise Labé and Veronica Franco, by Ann Rosalind Jones, 299–315.

 

Rhetoric, Women, and Politics in Early Modern England. Ed. Jennifer Richards and Alison Thorne. London: Routledge, 2006.

1.         Introduction, by Jennifer Richards and Alison Thorne, 1–24.

2.         Spelling Backwards, by Patricia Parker, 25–50.

3.         Caught in medias res: Female Intercession, “Regulation” and “Exchange”, by Rachel Heard, 51–69.

4.         Speaking Women: Rhetoric and the Construction of Female Talk, by Danielle Clarke, 70–88.

5.         Letter Writing Lucrece: Shakespeare in the 1590s, by Huw Griffiths, 89–110.

6.         “Presbyterian Sibyl”: Truth-Telling and Gender in The Third Advice to a Painter, by Martin Dzelzainis, 111–28.

7.         Exemplarity, Women and Political Rhetoric, by Susan Wiseman, 129–48.

8.         The Rhetoric of (In)fertility: Shifting Responses to Elizabeth I's Childlessness, by Helen Hackett, 149–71.

9.         Women’s Letters of Recommendation and the Rhetoric of Friendship in Sixteenth-Century England, by James Daybell, 172–90.

10.       Embodied Rhetoric: Quaker Public Discourse in the 1650s, by Hilary Hinds, 191–211.

11.       Afterword, by Neil Rhodes, 212–21.

 

The Rule of Women in Early Modern Europe. Ed. Anne J. Cruz and Mihoko Suzuki. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009.

Introduction, by Anne J. Cruz and Mihoko Suzuki, 1–10.

I.          The Rule of Women: Theories and Constructions

1.         Notions of Late Medieval Queenship: Christine de Pizan’s Isabeau of Bavaria, by Tracy Adams, 13–29.

2.         “Satisfaite de soy en soy mesme”: The Politics of Self-Representation in Jeanne d’Albret’s Ample déclaration, by Mary C. Ekman, 30–42.

3.         Tanto monta: The Catholic Monarchs’ Nuptial Fiction and the Power of Isabel I of Castille, by Barbara E. Weissberger, 43–63.

4.         Sword and Wimple: Isabel Clara Eugenia and Power, by Magdalena S. Sánchez, 64–79.

5.         “Princeps non Principissa”: Catherine of Brandenburg, Elected Prince of Transylvania (1629–30), by Éva Deák, 80–120.

II.        Sovereignty and Representation

6.         Juana of Austria: Patron of the Arts and Regent of Spain, 1554–59, by Anne J. Cruz, 103–22.

7.         Elizabeth I as Sister and “Loving Kinswoman”, by Carole Levin, 123–41.

8.         Fashioning Monarchy: Women, Dress, and Power at the Court of Elizabeth I, 1558–1603, by Catherine L. Howey, 142–56.

9.         Thrice Royal Queen: Katherine de Valois and the Tudor Monarchy in Henry V and Englands Heroicall Epistles, by Sandra Logan, 157–73.

10.       Warning Elizabeth with Catherine de’ Medici’s Example: Anne Dowriche’s French Historie and the Politics of Counsel, by Mihoko Suzuki, 174–93.

11.       History, Power, and the Representation of Elizabeth I in La Princesse de Clèves, by Elizabeth Ketner, 194–204.

 

Seeking the Woman in Late Medieval and Renaissance Writings: Essays in Feminist Contextual Criticism. Ed. Sheila Fisher and Janet E. Halley. Knoxville: The University of Tennessee Press, 1989.

Introduction:   The Lady Vanishes: The Problem of Women’s Absence in Late Medieval and Renaissance Texts, by Sheila Fisher and Janet E. Halley, 1–20.

I.          Exchanging Women: Male Texts and Homosocial Contexts

1.         Double Jeopardy: The Appropriation of Woman in Four Old French Romances of the “Cycle de la Gageure”, by Roberta L. Krueger, 21–50.

2.         The Feminization of Men in Chaucer’s Legend of Good Women, by Elaine Tuttle Hansen, 51–70.

3.         Taken Men and Token Women in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, by Sheila Fisher, 71–107.

II.        Informing Women: Medieval, Early Modern, and Postmodern

4.         The Rule of the Body: The Feminine Spirituality of the Ancrene Wisse, by Elizabeth Robertson, 109–34.

5.         Sexual Enclosure, Textual Escape: The Picara as Prostitute in the Spanish Female Picaresque Novel, by Anne J. Cruz, 135–60.

6.         The Empire’s New Clothes: Refashioning the Renaissance, by Marguerite Waller, 160–85.

III.       Writing Woman / Reading Women: Historical Women and the Masculine Production of Meaning

7.         Textual Intercourse: Anne Donne, John Donne, and the Sexual Poetics of Textual Exchange, by Janet E. Halley, 187–206.

8.         The Identity of the Reader in Marie de Gournay’s Le Proumenoir de Monsieur de Montaigne [1594], by Patricia Francis Cholakian, 207–32.

9.         Reading Ben Jonson’s Queens, by Margaret Maurer, 233–64.

 

Sex and Gender in Historical Perspective (Selections from Quaderni storici). Ed. Edward Muir and Guido Ruggiero. Trans. Margaret A. Gallucci with Mary M. Gallucci and Carole C. Gallucci. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1990.

Introduction, by Guido Ruggiero, vii–xxii.

1.         “Menstruum Quasi Monstruum”: Monstrous Births and Menstrual Taboo in the Sixteenth Century, by Ottavia Niccoli, trans. Mary M. Gallucci, 1–25.

2.         The New and the Old: The Spread of Syphilis (1494–1530), by Anna Foa, trans. Carole C. Gallucci, 26–45.

3.         Honor Regained: Women in the Casa del Soccorso di San Paolo in Sixteenth-Century Bologna, by Lucia Ferrante, trans. Margaret A. Gallucci, 46–72.

4.         Female Honor and the Social Control of Reproduction in Piedmont between 1600 and 1800, by Sandra Cavallo and Simona Cerutti, trans. Mary M. Gallucci, 73–109.

5.         The Spirit of Fornication: Virtue of the Soul and Virtue of the Body in Friuli, 1600–1800, by Luisa Accati, trans. Margaret A. Gallucci, 110–40.

6.         One Saint Less: The tory of Angela Mellini, a Bolognese Seamstress (1667–17[?]), by Luisa Ciammitti, trans. Margaret A. Gallucci, 141–76.

7.         Mothers-in-law, Daughters-in-law, and Sisters-in-law at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century in P. Of Friuli, by Flaviana Zanolla, trans. Margaret A. Gallucci, 171–99.

8.         Women in the Factory: Women’s Networks and Social Life in America (1900–1915), by Giulia Calvi, trans. Margaret A. Gallucci, 200–34.


Sex and Gender in Medieval and Renaissance Texts: The Latin Tradition. Ed. Barbara Gold, Paul Allen Miller, and Charles Platter. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1997.

Introduction by Gold, Miller, and Platter, 1–14.

5.         Petrarch’s Sofonisba: Seduction, Sacrifice, and Patriarchal Politics, by Donald Gilman, 111–38.

6.         Laurel as the Sign of Sin: Laura’s Textual Body in Petrarch’s Secretum, by Paul Allen Miller, 139–64.

7.         Woman, Space, and Renaissance Discourse, by Diana Robin, 165–88.

8.         In Praise of Woman’s Superiority: Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa’s De nobilitate (1529), by Diane S. Wood, 189–206.

9.         The Artificial Whore: George Buchanan’s Apologia pro Lena, by Charles Platter, 207–22.

10.       “She Never Recovered Her Senses”: Roxana and Dramatic Representations of Women at Oxbridge in the Elizabethan Age, by Elizabeth Richmond-Garza, 223–46.

11.       Latin and Greek Poetry by Five Renaissance Italian Women Humanists, by Holt Parker, 247–85.

 

Sexuality and Culture in Medieval and Renaissance Europe. Ed. Philip M. Soergel. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance History, Third Series, Volume II [Old Series Vol. 27, New Series, Vol. 17]. New York: AMS, 2005.

Introduction, by Philip M. Soergel, xi

Forum: The History of Sexuality at a Crossroads

1.         Bodies, Gender, Health, Disease: Recent Work on Medieval Women’s Medicine, by Monica Green, 1–46.

2.         The Mathematics of Sex: One to Two, or Two to One?, by Helen King, 47–58.

Articles

3.         A Medieval Territory for Touch, by Fernando Salmón, 59–82.

4.         Sexuality and the Sexual Organs in Latin Physiognomy 1200–1500, by Joseph Ziegler, 83–108.

5.         Donna con Donna? A 1295 Inquest into Female Sodomy, by Carol Lansing, 109–48.

6.         “Lustful Luther”: Male Libido in the Writings of the Reformer, by Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks, 123–48.

7.         An Unmarried Mother-to-be Weighs Her Options in Sixteenth-Century Nuremberg, by Joel F. Harrington, 149–204.

8.         The Performativity of Gender in Early Modern Spain: The Case of the Lactating Breast, by Charlene Villaseñor Black, 205–56.

9.         The Marriages of Women Rulers in Sixteenth-Century Britain: Gender and Cultural Analysis, by Retha M. Warnicke, 257–76.

 

Sexuality and Gender in Early Modern Europe: Institutions, Texts, Images. Ed. James Grantham Turner. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1992.

Introduction: A History of Sexuality?, by James Grantham Turner, 1–9.

1.         Marriage, Love, Sex, and Renaissance Civic Morality, by Guido Ruggiero, 10–30.

2.         Typology, Sexuality, and the Renaissance Esther, by Cristelle L. Baskins, 31–54.

3.         Artifice as Seduction in Titian, by Mary Pardo, 55–89.

4.         Renaissance Women and the Question of Class, by Constance Jordan, 90–106.

5.         Venetian Women Writers and Their Discontents, by Margaret F. Rosenthal, 107–32.

6.         The Ambiguity of Beauty in Tasso and Petrarch, by Naomi Yavneh, 133–57.

7.         The Ladies’ Man and the Age of Elizabeth, by Juliet Fleming, 158–81.

8.         Troping Utopia: Donne’s Brief for Lesbianism, by Janel Mueller, 182–207.

9.         Staging Gender: William Shakespeare and Elizabeth Cary, by Maureen Quilligan, 208–32.

10.       The Semiotics of Masculinity in Renaissance England, by David Kuchta, 233–46.

11.       Recuperating Women and the Man Behind the Screen, by Domna C. Stanton, 247–65.

12.       A Womb of His Own: Male Renaissance Poets in the Female Body, by Katharine Eisaman Maus, 266–88.

13.       The Geography of Love in Seventeenth-Century Women’s Fiction, by James F. Gaines and Josephine A. Roberts, 289–309.

14.       Gender and Conduct in Paradise Lost, by Michael C. Schoenfeldt, 310–338.

 

Sexuality and Marriage in Colonial Latin America. Ed. Asunción Lavrin. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1989.

Introduction: The Scenario the Actors, and the Issues, by Asunción Lavrin, 1–46.

I.          Sexuality

1.         Sexuality in Colonial Mexico: A Church Dilemma, by Asunción Lavrin, 47–95.

2.         Individualization and Acculturation: Confession among the Nahuas of Mexico from the Sixteenth to the Eighteenth Century, by Serge Gruzinski, 96–117.

3.         Honor, Sexuality, and Illegitimacy in Colonial Spanish America, by Ann Twinam, 118–55.

4.         The Sinners and the Bishop in Colonial Venezuela: The Visita of Bishop Mariano Marti, 1771–1784, by Kathy Waldron, 156–76.

II.        Marriage

5.         Acceptable Partners: Marriage Choice in Colonial Argentina, 1778–1810, by Susan M. Socolow, 209–51.

6.         Women, La Mala Vida, and the Politics of Marriage, by Richard Boyer, 252–87.

7.         The Warmth of the Hearth: Seventeenth-Century Guadalajara Families, by Thomas Calvo, 287–312.

8.         Divorce in Colonial Brazil: The Case of Sao Paulo, by Maria Beatriz Nizza da Silva, 313–40.

 

Sibling Relations and Gender in the Early Modern World: Sisters, Brothers, and Others. Ed. Naomi Miller and Naomi Yavneh. Women and Gender in the Early Modern World. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2006.

1.         Introduction: Thicker than Water: Evaluating Sibling Relations in the Early Modern Period, by Miller and Yavneh, 1–12

I.          Divine Devotion

2.         Making a Saint out of a Sibling, by Susan B. Laningham, 15–27.

3.         Recusant Sisters: English Catholic Women and the Bonds of Learning, by Kari Boyd McBride, 28–39.

4.         Families, Convents, Music: The Power of Sisterhood, by Craig A. Monson, 40–52.

5.         “Liebe Schwester...”: Siblings, Convents, and the Reformation, by Merry Wiesner-Hanks, 51–62.

II.        Ties That Bind

6.         Resisting Henry IV: Catherine de Bourbon and Her Brother, by Jane Couchman, 64–76.

7.         Sister-Subject/Sister-Queen: Elizabeth I among her Siblings, by Carole Levin, 77–88.

8.         Mary Sidney’s Other Brothers, by Margaret P. Hannay, 89–102.

III.       Drawing the Line

9.         The Politics of Private Discourse: Familial Relations in Lady Mary Wroth’s Urania, by Sheila T. Cavanagh, 104–15.

10.       When the Mirror Lies: Sisterhood Reconsidered in Moderata Fonte’s Thirteen Cantos of Floridoro, by Valeria Finucci, 116–28.

11.       Andrea and Giovanni Gabrieli: Musicians and Sororal Relations in Later Sixteenth-Century Venice, by Rebecca Edwards, 129–39.

12.       Shame of Siblings in David and Bethsabe, by Stephen Guy-Bray, 140–49.

13.       Sibling Bonds and Bondage in (and beyond) Shakespeare’s The Tempest, by Naomi J. Miller, 150–63.

IV.       Hand in Hand

14.       Playing the Game: Sisterly Relations in Sofonisba Anguissola’s The Chess Game, by Naomi Miller, 166–81.

15.       “My Deare Sister”: Sainted Sisterhood in Early Modern England, by Kathryn R. McPherson, 182–94.

16.       Sisterly Feelings in Cavendish and Brackley’s Drama, by Alison Findlay, 195–205.

17.       “Thy Passionately Loving Sister and Faithfull Friend”: Anne Dormer’s Letters to her Sister, Lady Trumbull, by Sara Mendelson and Mary O’Connor, 206–15.

18.       Siblings, Publications, and the Transmission of Memory: Johann Albert Hinrich and Elise Reimarus, by Almut Spalding, 216–27.

19.       Thicker Than Blood: l’oltr’altra, by Naomi J. Miller and Naomi Yavneh, 228–30.

 

Silent but for the Word: Tudor Women as Patrons, Translators, and Writers of Religious Works. Ed. Margaret Hannay. Kent, OH:  Kent State University Press, 1985.

1.         Introduction, by Margaret P. Hannay, 1–14.

2.         Some Sad Sentence: Vives’ Instruction of a Christian Woman, 15–29.

3.         Margaret More Roper’s Personal Expression in the Devout Treatise Upon the Pater Noster, by Rita Verbrugge, 30–42.

4.         Patronage and Piety: The Influence of Catherine Parr, by John N. King, 43–60.

5.         The Pearl of the Valois and Elizabeth I: Marguerite de Navarre’s Miroir and Tudor England, by Anne Lake Prescott, 61–76.

6.         Anne Askew’s Self-Portrait in the Examinations, by Elaine V. Beilin, 77–91.

7.         Lady Jane Grey: Protestant Queen and Martyr, by Carol Levin, 92–106.

8.         The Cooke Sisters: Attitudes toward Learned Women in the Renaissance, by Mary Ellen Lamb, 107–25.

9.         The Style of the Countess of Pembroke’s Translation of Philippe de Mornay’s Discours de la vie et de la mort, by Diane Bornstein, 126–48.

10.       “Doo What Men May Sing”: Mary Sidney and the Tradition of Admonitory Dedication, by Margaret P. Hannay, 149–65.

11.       Mary Sidney’s Psalmes: Education and Wisdom, by Beth Wynne Fisken, 166–83.

12.       Spenser and the Patronesses of the Fowre Hy6mnes: “Ornaments of All True Love and Beautie”, by Jon A. Quitslund, 184–202.

13.       Of God and Good Women: The Poems of Aemilia Lanyer, by Barbara K. Lewalski, 203–24.

14.       Elizabeth Cary and Tyranny, Domestic and Religious, by Sandra K. Fischer, 225–37.

15.       Struggling into Discourse: The Emergence of Renaissance Women’s Writing, by Gary F. Waller, 238–56.

 

The Single Woman in Medieval and Early Modern England: Her Life and Representation. Ed. Laurel Amtower and Dorothea Kehler. MRTS 263. Tempe, AZ: Center for Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 2003.

Introduction, by Laurel Amtower and Dorothea Kehle, ix.

I.          Celebrating Celibacy

1.         The Single Woman as Saint: Three Anglo-Norman Success Stories, by Jane Zatta,  1–20.

2.         I Want to Be Alone: The Single Woman in Fifteenth-Century Legends of St. Katherine of Alexandria, by Paul Price, 21–40.

3.         Gender, Marriage, and Knighthood: Single Ladies in Malory, by Dorsey Armstrong, 41–64.

II.        Repudiating Marriage

4.         To Be or Not to Be Married: Single Women, Money-lending, and the Question of Choice in Late Tudor and Stuart England, by Judith M. Spicksley, 65–96.

5.         A Strange Hatred of Marriage: John Lyly, Elizabeth I, and the Ends of Comedy, by Jacqueline Vanhoutte, 97–118.

III.       Imaginary Widowhood

6.         Chaucer's Sely Widows, by Laurel Amtower, 119–32.

7.         (Re)creations of a Single Woman: Discursive Realms of the Wife of Bath, by Jeanie Grant Moore, 133–46.

8.         Good Grief: Widow Portraiture and Masculine Anxiety in Early Modern England Allison Levy, 147–66.

IV.       Sexuality and Revirgination

9.         Working Girls: Status, Sexual Difference, and Disguise in Ariosto, Spenser, and Shakespeare, by Tracey Sedinger, 167–92.

10.       “News from the Dead”: The Strange Story of a Woman Who Gave Birth, Was Executed, and Was Resurrected as a Virgin, by Susan C. Staub, 193–210.

11.       Frances Howard and Middleton and Rowley's The Changeling: Trials, Tests, and the Legibility of the Virgin Body, by Mara Amster, 211–31.

 

Singlewomen in the European Past, 1250–1800. Ed. Judith M. Bennett and Amy M. Froide.  Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1999.

1.         A Singular Past, by Judith M. Bennett and Amy M. Froide, 1–37.

2.         Singlewomen in Medieval and Early Modern Europe: The Demographic Perspective, by Maryanne Kowaleski, 38–81. Tables for this chapter, 325–44.

3.         “It is not good that [wo]man should be alone”: Elite Responses to Singlewomen in High Medieval Paris, by Sharon Farmer, 82–105.

4.         Single by Law and Sustom, by Susan Mosher Stuard, 106–26.

5.         Sex and the Singlewoman, by Ruth Mazo Karras, 127–45.

6.         Transforming Maidens: Singlewomen’s Stories in Marie de France's Lais and later French Courtly Narratives, by Roberta L. Krueger, 146–91.

7.         Having Her Own Smoke: Employment and Independence for Singlewomen in Germany, 1400–1750, by Merry E. Wiesner, 192–216.

8.         Singlewomen in Early Modern Venice: Communities and Opportunities, by Monica Chojnacka, 217–235.

9.         Marital Status as a Category of Difference: Singlewomen and Widows in Early Modern England, by Amy M. Froide, 236–69.

10.       The Sapphic Strain: English Lesbians in the Long Eighteenth Century, by Margaret R. Hunt, 270–96.

11.       Singular Politics: The Rise of the British Nation and the Production of the Old Maid, by Susan S. Lanser, 297–323.

Strong Voices, Weak History: Early Women Writers and Canons in England, France, and Italy. Ed. Pamela J. Benson and Victoria Kirkham. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005.

Introduction, by Pamela J. Benson and Victoria Kirkham, 1–13.

1.         Women Writers and the Canon in Sixteenth-Century Italy: The Case of Vittoria Colonna, by Virginia Cox, 14–31.

2.         A Female Tradition: Women’s Dialogue Writing in Sixteenth-Century France, by Janet Levarie Smarr, 32–57.

3.         Strong Voices, Weak Minds: The Defenses of Eve by Isotta Nogarola and Christine de Pizan, Who Found Themselves in Simone de Beauvoir’s Situation, by Thelma S. Fenster, 58–77.

4.         The Canon of Religious Life: Maria Domitilla Galluzzi and the Rule of St. Clare of Assisi, by E. Ann Matter, 78–99.

5.         Christine de Pizan: Gender and the New Vernacular Canon, by Kevin Brownlee, 99–120.

6.         Women Writers in Renaissance Italy: Courtly Origins of New Literary Canons, by Fabio Finotti, 121–45.

7.         The Stigma of Italy Undone: Aemilia Lanyer’s Canonization of Lady Mary Sidney, by Pamela Joseph Benson, 146–75.

8.         Sappho on the Arno: The Brief Fame of Laura Battiferra, by Victoria Kirkham, 176–98.

9.         The Place of Female Mysticism in the Italian Literary Canon, by Armando Maggi, 199–215.

10.       Thomas Bentley’s Monument of Matrons: The Earliest Anthology of English Women’s Texts, by John N. King, 216–38.

11.       The Collector’s Cabinet: Lodovico Domenichi’s Gallery of Women, by Deanna Shemek, 239–62.

12.       Recollecting the Renaissance: Luisa Bergalli’s Componimenti Poetici (1726), by Stuart Curran, 263–86.

13.       Bad Press: Modern Editors versus Early Modern Women Poets (Tullia d’Aragona, Gaspara Stampa, Veronica Franco), by Ann Rosalind Jones, 287–313.

14.       Fascist Appropriations: The Case of Jolanda De Blasi’s Le scrittici italiane, by Lina Insana, 314–40.

15.       A Woman for all Seasons: The Reinvention of Anne Askew, by Elaine V. Beilin, 341–64.

Structures and Subjectivities: Attending to Early Modern Women. Ed. Joan E. Hartman and Adele Seeff. Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2007.

Introduction, by Joan Hartman, 3–19.

I.          Geographies and Polities

1.         Renaissance Genderscapes, by Adrian W. B. Randolph, 21–49.

2.         Locating Holiness in Early Modern Spain: Convents, Caves, and Houses, by Alison Weber, 50–74.

3.         Representing Women in Early Modern Italian Economic History, by Joanne M. Ferraro, 75–90.

II.        Keynote Address

4.         The Perilous Enchanting Allure of Convent Singing, by Craig A. Monson, 111–33.

III.       Degree, Priority, and Place

5.         Shoes and Fashion: The Cosmology of Female Desires in China, by Dorothy Ko, 135–56.

6.         The Political Economy of Same-Sex Desire, by Susan S. Lancer, 157–74.

7.         Women in Ottoman and Western European Law Courts: Were Western Women really the luckiest women in the world?, by Margaret R. Hunt, 176–202.

IV.       The Built Environment

8.         Inhabiting the Great Man’s House: Women and Space at Monticello, by Elizabeth V. Chew, 223–52.

9.         Picture Perfect: Female Performance and Social Liminality in the Florentine Renaissance City, by Carole Collier Frick, 253–78.

10.       A Womb of One’s Own: Constructing Maternal Space in Early Modern England and Beyond, by Naomi J. Miller, 279–96.

V.        Pedagogies

11.       The Early Modern Woman in the Twenty-First-Century Museum, by Julia Marciari Alexander, 315–23.

12.       But is it any good? The Value of Teaching Early Modern Writers, by Susanne Woods, 321–40.

13.       Managing Stress: Connecting Research and Pedagogy in Women’s History, by Alyson Poska, 341–58.

 

Teaching Judith Shakespeare. Ed. Elizabeth H. Hageman and Sara Jayne Steen. Special Issue of  Shakespeare Quarterly 47:4 (1996).

1.         Judith Shakespeare Reading, by Frances Teague, 361–73.

2.         “For solace a twinne-like sister”: Teaching Themes of Sisterhood in As You Like It and Beyond, by Jan Stirm, 374–86.

3.         Single sex retreats in two early modern dramas: Love’s Labor’s Lost and Convent of Pleasure, Irene G. Dash, 387–95.

4.         Judith Shakespeare’s Reading: Teaching The Concealed Fancies, 396–406.

5.         “Thou maist have thy Will”: The sonnets of Shakespeare and his stepsisters, by Josephine A. Roberts, 407–23.

6.         Why William and Judith both need their own rooms, by Nancy Gutierrez, 424–32.

7.         Credible consorts: What happens when Shakespeare’s sisters enter the syllabus? by Megan Machinske, 433–50.

8.         The family is a little commonwealth: Teaching Mariam and Othello in a special-topics course on domestic England, by Theresa D. Kemp, 451–60.

9.         Beauty and the Beast of Whiteness: Teaching race and gender, by Kim F. Hall, 461–75.

10.       Teaching Shakespeare in the context of Renaissance women’s culture, by Jane Donawerth, 476–89.

 

Teaching Other Voices: Women and Religion in Early Modern Europe. Ed. Margart L. King and Albert Rabil, Jr. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007.

Introduction:   Women and Religion in Early Modern Europe, by Margaret L. King and Albert Rabil, Jr.

A.        The Historical Context, 1–22.

B.        Chronology, 23–24.

C.        Courses and Modules, 25–28.

1..        Italian Holy Women of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries

A.        Teaching Women’s Devotion in Medieval and Early Modern Italy, by Lance Lazar, 31–43.

B.        Reading Sister Bartolomea, by Daniel Bornstein, 44–52.

2.         Elite Women of the High Renaissance

A.        Teaching Tornabuoni’s Troublesome Women, by Jane Tylus, 55–74.

B.        Antonia Pulci (ca. 1452–1501), the First Published Woman Playwright, by Elissa Weaver, 75–85.

C.        Vittoria Colonna, Sonnets for Michelangelo, by Abigail Brundin, 86–97.

D.        Marguerite de Navarre: Religious Reformist, by Rouben Cholakian, 98–109.

3.         Women and the Reformation

A.        Marie Dentière: An Outspoken Reformer Enters the French Literary Canon, by Mary McKinley, 113–26.

B.        Reading Jean de Jussie’s Short Chronicle with First-Year Students, by Carrie F. Klaus, 127–36.

C.        Teaching Katharina Schütz Zell (1498–1562), by Elsie McKee, 137–53.

4.         Holy Women in the Age of the Inquisition

A.        Francisca de los Apóstoles: A Visionary Speaks, by Gillian T. W. Ahlgren, 157–66.

B.        “Mute Tongues Beget Understanding”: Recovering the Voice of María de San José, by Alison Weber, 167–75.

C.        Cecilia Ferrazzi and the Pursuit of Sanctity in the Early Modern World, by Elizabeth Horodowich, 176–82.

5.         Post-Reformation Currents

A.        Convent and Doctrine: Teaching Jacqueline Pascal, by John J. Conley, SJ, 185–92.

B.        Johanna Eleonora Petersen (1644–1724): Pietism and Women’s Autobiography in Seventeenth-Century Germany, by Barbara Becker-Cantarino, 193–201.

Appendix:       Approaches to Teaching Presented in the Volume, by Margaret L. King and Albert Rabil, Jr., 203–15.

Teaching Tudor and Stuart Women Writers. Ed. Susanne Woods and Margaret P. Hannay. New York: MLA, 2000.

Introduction, by Margaret P. Hannay and Susanne Woods, 1–20.

I.          Women’s Lives and Women's Texts

1.         Constructions of Women Readers, by Mary Ellen Lamb, 23–34.

2.         Circulating Texts in Early Modern England, by Wendy Wall, 35–51.

3.         Women's Manuscript Miscellanies in Early Modern England, by Elizabeth Clarke, 52–60.

4.         Women Writing Literature in Italy and France, by Pamela J. Benson, 61–71.

5.         Writing History, by Elaine V. Beilin, 72–83.

6.         Writing Religion, by John N. King and Frances E. Dolan and Elaine Hobby, 84–103.

7.         Writing Society, by Naomi J. Miller, 104–16

II.        Selected Authors

8.         Queen Elizabeth I, by Janel Mueller, 119–126.

9.         Anne Vaughan Lock, by Susan M. Felch, 127–35.

10.       Mary Sidney, Countess of Pembroke, by Margaret P. Hannay, 135–44.

11.       Lady Mary Wroth, by Josephine A. Roberts and Margaret P. Hannay, 145–54.

12.       Aemilia Lanyer, by Susanne Woods, 155–63.

13.       Elizabeth Cary, Lady Falkland, by Barry Weller, 164–73.

14.       Rachel Speght, by Barbara K. Lewalski, 174–84.

15.       Katherine Philips, by Elizabeth H. Hageman, 185–94.

16.       Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle, by Anne Shaver, 195–203.

17.       Aphra Behn, by Germaine Greer, 204–16.

II.        Models for Teaching Introduction, 217.

18.       Theoretical Issues Teaching the Writings of Early Modern Women from a Theoretical Perspective, by Gary F. Waller, 221–26.

19.       Theory in the Teaching of Early Modern Women Writers, by Paula Loscocco, 227–34.

20.       Early Modern Women Writing Race, by Kim F. Hall and Gwynne Kennedy, 235–42.

21.       Strategies Juxtaposing Genders: Jane Lead and John Milton, by Betty S. Travitsky and Anne Lake Prescott, 243–47.

22.       Portraits: Self and Other, by Erna Kelly, 248–52.

23.       Archival Studies: Retrieving the “Nonexistent” Women Writers of the English Renaissance, by Ann Hurley, 253–60.

24.       Types of Courses Illuminating the Margins of the Early Modern Period:

25.       Using Women's Voices in the History Class, by Carole Levin, 261–65.

26.       Teaching (Early Modern Women's) Writing, by Bernadette Andrea, 266–70.

27.       Canons and Course Packs: Teaching Seventeenth-Century Women's Writing in Belfast, by Ramona Wray, 271–78.

28.       Teaching Specific Texts Teaching Class: Whitney's “Wyll and Testament” and Nashe's “Litany in Time of Plague”, by Patricia Brace, 279–82.

29.       Isabella Whitney and the Ideologies of Writing and Publication, by Lynette F. McGrath. 283–88.

30.       Seven Faces of Cleopatra, by Elizabeth Patton, 289.

31.       Aemilia Lanyer and Virtue, by Mary V. Silcox, 295–98.

32.       Diabolic Dreamscape in Lanyer and Milton, by Josephine A. Roberts, 299–302.

33.       Teaching Aphra Behn’s “The Disappointment”, by Stephen C. Behrendt, 303–7.

34.       Teaching Aphra Behn’s The Rover, by Robin Ikegami, 308–13.

IV.       Resources for Further Study

35.       Lost in the Archives? Searching for Records of Early Modern Women, by Georgianna Ziegler, 315–47.

36.       Traditional Studies of Early Women Writers, by Suzanne W. Hull, 348–56.

37.       “My Bookes and Pen I Wyll Apply”: Recent Studies of Early Modern British Women Writers, by Sara Jayne Steen, 357–

 

The Single Woman in Medieval and Early Modern England: Her Life and Representation. Ed. Dorothea Kehler and Laurel Amtower. Tempe, AZ: MRTS, 2002.

Introduction, by Laurel Amtower and Dorothea Kehler, ix.

I.          Celebrating Celibacy

1.         The Single Woman as Saint: Three Anglo-Norman Success Stories, by Jane Zatta, 1–20.

2.         I Want to Be Alone: The Single Woman in Fifteenth-Century Legends of St. Katherine of Alexandria, by Paul Price, 21–40.

3.         Gender, Marriage, and Knighthood: Single Ladies in Malory, by Dorsey Armstrong, 41–63.

II.        Repudiating Marriage

4.         To Be or Not to Be Married: Single Women, Money-lending, and the Question of Choice in Late Tudor and Stuart England, by Judith M. Spicksley, 65–96.

5.         A Strange Hatred of Marriage: John Lyly, Elizabeth I, and the Ends of Comedy, by Jacqueline Vanhoutte, 97–117.

III.       Imaginary Widowhood

6.         Chaucer’s Sely Widows, by Laurel Amtower, 119–32.

7.         (Re)creations of a Single Woman: Discursive Realms of the Wife of Bath, by Jeanie Grant Moore, 133–46.

8.         Good Grief: Widow Portraiture and Masculine Anxiety in Early Modern England, by Allison Levy, 147–65.

IV.       Sexuality and Revirgination

9.         Working Girls: Status, Sexual Difference, and Disguise in Ariosto, Spenser, and Shakespeare, Tracey Sedinger, 167–92.

10.       “News from the Dead”: The Strange Story of a Woman Who Gave Birth, Was Executed, and Was Resurrected as a Virgin, by Susan C. Staub, 193–210.

11.       Frances Howard and Middleton and Rowley's The Changeling: Trials, Tests, and the Legibility of the Virgin Body, by Mara Amster, 211.

 

“This Double Voice”: Gendered Writing in Early Modern England. Ed. Danielle Clarke and Elizabeth Clarke. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2000.

Introduction, by Danielle Clark, 1–15.

1.         Female Authority and Authorization Strategies in Early Modern Europe, by Jane Stevenson 16–40.

2.         “In a mirrour clere”: Protestantism and Politics in Anne Lok’s Misere mei Deus, by Rosalind Smith, 41–60.

3.         “Formed into words by your divided lips”: Women, Rhetoric and the Ovidian Tradition, by Danielle Clarke, 61–87.

4.         The Voices of Anne Cooke, Lady Anne and Lady Bacon, by Alan Stewart, 88–102.

5.         Old Wives’ Tales Retold: the Mutations of the Fairy Queen, by Diane Purkiss, 103–22.

6.         Giving Time to Women: the Eternizing Project in Early Modern England, by Amy Boesky, 123–41.

7.         The “Double Voice” of Renaissance Equity and the Literary Voices of Women, by Lorna Hutson, 142–63.

8.         “For Worth, not Weakness, Makes in Use but One”: Literary Dialogues in an English Renaissance Family, by Marion Wynne-Davies, 164–84.

9.         “Whom the Lord with love affecteth”: Gender and the Religious Poet, 1590–1633, by Helen Wilcox, 185–207.

10        Ejaculation or Virgin Birth? The Gendering of the Religious Lyric in the Interregnum, by Elizabeth Clarke, 208–29.

11        Unfettered Organs: the Polemical Voices of Katherine Philips, by James Loxley, 230–48.

12.       A Voice for Hermaphroditical Education, by Frances Teague, 149–69.

 

Time, Space, and Women’s Lives in Early Modern Europe. Ed. Anne Jacobson Schutte, Thomas Kuehn, and Silvana Seidel Menchi. Kirksville, MO: Truman State University Press, 2001.

Introduction, by Thomas Kuehn and Anne Jacobson Schutte, vii–xvii.

I.         

1.         Women’s History and Social History: Are Structures Necessary?, by Merry Wiesner-Hanks, 3–16.

2.         The Querelle des Femmes as a Cultural Studies Paradigm, by Margarete Zimmermann, 17–28.

3.         Grammar in Arcadia, by Gabriele Beck-Busse, 29–40.

4.         The Girl and the Hourglass: Periodization of Women’s Lives in Western Preindustrial Societies, by Silvana Seidel Menchi, 41–74.

II.

5.         Getting Back the Dowry: Venice, c. 1360–1530, by Stanley Chojnacki, 77–96.

6.         Daughters, Mothers, Wives, and Widows: Women as Legal Persons, by Thomas Kuehn, 97–116.

7.         Women Married Elsewhere: Gender and Citizenship in Italy, by Julius Kirshner, 117–49.

III.

8.         “Saints” and “Witches” in Early Modern Italy: Stepsisters or Strangers?, by Anne Jacobson Schutte, 153–64.

9.         The Dimensions of the Cloister: Enclosure, Constraint, and Protection in Seventeenth-Century Italy, by Francesca Medioli, 165–80.

10.       The Third Status, by Gabriella Zarri, 181–99.

IV.

11.       “Non lo volevo per marito: in modo alcuno”: Forced Marriages, Generational Conflicts, and the Limits of Patriarchal Power in Early Modern Venice, c. 1580–1680, by Daniela Hacke, 203–22.

12.       Becoming a Mother in the Seventeenth Century: The Experience of a Roman Noblewoman, by Marina d’Amelia, 223–44.

13.       Space, Time, and the Power of Aristocratic Wives in Yorkist and Early Tudor England, 1450–1550, by Barbara J. Harris, 245–64.

14.       Eighteenth-Century Marriage Contracts: Linking Legal and Gender History, by Gunda Barth-Scalmani, 265–81.

V.

15.       En-Gendering Selfhood: Defining Differences and Forging Identities in Early Modern Europe, by Kristin Eldyss Sorensen Zapalac, 285–304.

16.       Construction of Masculinity and Male Identity in Personal Testimonies: Hans Von Schweinichen (1552–1616) in his Memorial, by Heide Wunder, 305–23.

 

Translating Desire in Medieval and Early Modern Literature. Ed. Craig Berry and Heather Hayton. MRTS 294. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005.

1.         Translating Desire: An Introduction, vii

I.          Translating Bodies: Materiality, Suffering Concealment

2.         Resisting the Father in Pearl, by Daniel T. Kline, 1–30.

3.         Victim of Love: The Poetics and Politics of Violence in Le Printemps of Theodore Agrippa d’Aubigné, by Kathleen Long, 31–48.

4.         Body Politics in Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso, by Albert R. Ascoli, 49–87.

II.        Translating Form: Gender, Genre, Identity

5.         Desire in Language and Form: Heloise’s Challenge to Abelard, by Suzanne Wayne, 89–108.

6.         Translating Petrarchan Desire in Vittoria Colonna and Gaspara Stampa, by V. Stanley Benfell, 109–32.

7.         “Odious ballads”: Fallen Women’s Laments and All’s Well that Ends Well, by Mary Trull, 133–55.

III.       Translating Power: City, Lineage, Ideology

8.         Teaching How to Translate: Love and Citizenship in Brunetto Latini's Tesoretto, by Heather Richardson Hayton, 157–90.

9.         What Silence Desires: Female Inheritance and the Romance of Property in the Roman de Silence, by Craig A. Berry, 191–206.

10.       Resisting Translation: Britomart in book 3 of Spenser’s Faerie Queene, by Harry Berger Jr., 207–49.

Virtue, Liberty, and Toleration: Political Ideas of European Women 1400–1700. Ed. Karen S. Broad and Karen Green. Dordrecht: Springer, 2007.

Introduction, by Jacqueline Broad and Karen Green, xv

1.         Political Thought as Improvisation: Female Regency and Mariology in Late Medieval French Thought, by Earl Jeffrey Richards, 1–22.

2.         Phronesis Feminised: Prudence from Christine de Pizan to Elizabeth I, by Karen Green, 23–38.

3.         Catherine d’Amboise’s Livre des Prudents et Imprudents: Negotiating Space for Female Voices in Political Discourse, by Catherine M. Müller, 39–56.

4.         “Machiavelli in Skirts”: Isabella d’Este and Politics, by Carolyn James, 57–76.

5.         Liberty and the Right of Resistance: Women’s Political Writings of the English Civil War Era, by Jacqueline Broad, 77–94.

6.         Margaret Cavendish and the False Universal, by Hilda L. Smith, 95–110.

7.         The Social and Political Thought to Damaris Cudworth Masham, by Regan Penaluna, 111–22.

8.         “Our Religion and Liberties”: Mary Astell’s Christian Political Polemics, by Michal Michelson, 123–36.

9.         Virtue, God, and Stoicism in the Thought of Elizabeth Carter and Catharine Macaulay, by Sarah Hutton, 137–48.

10.       Catharine Macaulay and Mary Wollstonecraft on the Will, by Martina Reuter, 149–70.

11.       Keeping Ahead of the English? A Defence of Jews by Cornélie Wouters, Baroness of Vasse (1790), by Carrie F. Klaus, 189–203.

 

Voicing Women: Gender and Sexuality in Early Modern Writing. Ed. Kate Chedgzoy, Melanie Hansen, and Suzanne Trill. Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press, 1996, 1998

Introduction: “Voice that is Mine”, by Kate Chedgzoy, 1–9.

1.         The Word and the Throne: John Knox’s The First Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous Regiment of Women, by Melanie Hansen, 11–24.

2.         Engendering Penitence: Nicholas Breton and “the Countesse of Penbrooke”, by Suzanne Trill, 25–44.

3.         Women Writers and Women Readers: The Case of Aemilia Lanier, by Jacqueline Pearson, 45–54.

4.         The Canonization of Elizabeth Cary, by Stephanie Wright, 55–68.

5.         Dionys Fitzherbert and the Anatomy of Madness, by Katherine Hodgkin, 69–92.

6.         The Torture of Limena: Sex and Violence in Lady Mary Wroth’s Urania, by Helen Hackett, 93–110.

7.         The Iconography of the Blush: Marian Literature of the 1630s, by Danielle Clarke, 111–28.

8.         Playing the “Masculine Part”: Finding a Difference within Behn’s Poetry, by Bronwen Price, 129–52.

9.         Read Within: Gender, Cultural Difference and Quaker Women’s Travel Narratives, by Susan Wiseman, 153–72.

10.       Contra-dictions: Women as Figures of Exclusion and Resistance in John Bunyan and Agnes Beaumonth’s Narratives, by Tamsin Spargo, 173–84.

11.       Seditious Sisterhood: Women Publishers of Opposition Literature at the Restoration, by Maureen Bell, 185–95.

 

Widowhood and Visual Culture in Early Modern Europe. Ed. Allison Levy. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2003.

1.         Widow’s Peek: Looking at Ritual and Representation, by Allison Levy, 1–16.

I.          Representing Widowhood: Mourning Models

2.         “Widowhood was the time of her greatest perfection”: Ideals of Widowhood and Sanctity in Florentine Art, by Catherine Lawless, 19–38.

3.         Memento Mori: Death, Widowhood and Remembering in Early Modern England, by J. S. W. Helt, 39–54.

4.         Mourning Widows: Portraits of Widows and Widowhood in Funeral Sermons from Brunswick-Wolfenbuettel, by Marina Arnold, 55–74.

II.        Re-Presenting Widowhood: Fashionable Choices

5.         Casting Her Widowhood: The Contemporary and Posthumous Portraits of Caterina Sforza, by Joyce de Vries, 77–92.

6.         A Widow’s Tears, a Queen’s Ambition: The Variable History of Marie de Médicis’s Bereavement,” by Elizabeth McCartney, 93–108.

7.         Conceptualizing the Kaiserenwitwe: Empress Maria Theresia and her Portraits, by Michael E. Yonan, 109–26.

III.       Widowhood and Representation: Building Memories

8.         Individual Fame and Family Honor: The Tomb of Dogaressa Agnese da Mosto Venier, by Holly S. Hurlburt, 129–44.

9.         Margaret of Austria and the Encoding of Power in Patronage: The Funerary Foundation at Brou, by Laura D. Gelfand, 145–60.

10.       A Widow Building in Elizabethan England: Bess of Hardwick at Hardwick Hall, by Sara French, 161–76.

11.       Constructing Convents in Sixteenth-Century Castile: Toledan Widows and Patterns of Patronage, by Stephanie Fink De Backer, 176–94.

IV.       Widowhood and Re-Presentation: Constructing Histories

12.       Trecento Rome: The Poetics and Politics of Widowhood, by Cristelle L. Baskins, 197–210.

13.       Framing Widows: Mourning, Gender and Portraiture in Modern Florence, by Allison Levy, 211–32.

14.       Contested Narratives: Elisabeth of Austria and a Relic of St. Leopold, by Amelia Carr, 233–48.

V.        Afterword

15.       Last Rites: Mourning Identities (?), by Allison Levy, 251–56.

 

Widowhood in Medieval and Early Modern Europe. Ed. Sandra Cavallo and Lydan Warner. New York: Longman, 1999.

I.          Defining Widowhood, 1–2.

1.         Introduction, by Sandra Cavallo and Lyndan Warner, 3–23.

2.         Men, Women and Widows: Widowhood in pre-Conquest England, by Julia Crick, 24–36.

3.         Finding Widowers: Men without Women in English Towns before 1700, by Margaret Pelling, 37–54.

II.        Models and Paradoxes, 55–56.

4.         The Widow’s Options in Medieval Southern Italy, by Patricia Skinner, 57–65.

5.         The Virtuous Widow in Protestant England, by Barbara J. Todd, 66–83.

6.         Widows, Widowers and the Problem of “Second Marriages” in Sixteenth-Century France, by Lyndan Warner, 84–107.

7.         Marrying the Experienced Widow in Early Modern England: The Male Perspective, by Elizabeth Foyster, 108–124.

III.       Marital and Family Constraints, 125–26.

8.         Lineage Strategies and the Control of Widows in Renaissance Florence, by Isabelle Chabot, 127–44.

9.         Property and Widowhood in England 1660–1840, by Amy Louise Erickson, 145–63.

10.       Religious Difference and the Experience of Widowhood in Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Germany, by Dagmar Freist, 164–78.

IV.       Narratives and Constructions of Widowhood, 179

11.       Elite Widows and Religious Expression in Early Modern Spain: The View from Avila, by Jodi Bilinkoff, 181–92.

12.       Widows at Law in Tudor and Stuart England, by Tim Stretton, 193–208.

13.       Widows, the State and the Guardianship of Children in Early Modern Tuscany, by Giulia Calvi, 209–19.

14.       Survival Strategies and Stories: Poor Widows and Widowers in Early Industrial England, by Pamela Sharpe, 220–39.

Suggestions for Reading on Widowhood, 240–61.

 

Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe: Studies in Culture and Belief. Ed. Jonathan Barry, Marianne Hester, and Gareth Roberts. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

1.         Introduction: Keith Thomas and the Problem of Witchcraft, by Jonathan Barry, 1–47.

I.          The Crime and Its History

2.         “Many Reasons Why”: Witchcraft and the Problem of Multiple Explanation, by Robin Briggs, 49–63.

3.         Witchcraft Studies in Austria, Germany and Switzerland, by Wolfgang Behringer, 64–95.

4.         State-Building and Witch Hunting in Early Modern Europe, by Brian P. Levack, 96–117.

II.        Witchcraft and Religion

5.         The Devil’s Encounter with America, by Fernando Cervantes, 119–44.

6.         “Saints or Sorcerers”: Quakerism, Demonology and the Decline of Witchcraft in Seventeenth-Century England, by Peter Elmer, 145–81.

III.       The Making of a Witch

7.         The Descendants of Circe: Witches and Renaissance Fictions, by Gareth Roberts, 183–206.

8.         Witchcraft and Fantasy in Early Modern Germany, by Lyndal Roper, 207–36.

9.         The Devil in East Anglia: The Matthew Hopkins Trials Reconsidered, by Jim Sharpe, 237–55.

IV.       Witchcraft and the Social Environment

10.       Witchcraft in Early Modern Kent: Stereotypes and the Background to Accusations, 257–87.

11.       Patriarchal Reconstruction and Witch Hunting, by Marianne Hester, 288–307.

V.        Decline

12.       Witchcraft Repealed, by Ian Bostridge, 309–34.

13.       On the Continuation of Witchcraft, by Willem de Blécourt, 335–51.

 

Women and Faith: Catholic Religious Life in Italy from Late Antiquity to the Present. Ed. Lucetta Scaraffia and Gabrielle Zarri. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1999.

Introduction, by Lucetta Scaraffia and Gabrielle Zarri, 1–7

3.         Society and Women’s Religiosity, 750–1450, by Giulia Barone, trans. Keith Botsford, 42–71.

4.         Women, Faith, and Image in the Late Middle Ages, by Dominique Rigaux, trans. Keith Botsford, 72–82.

5.         From Prophecy to Discipline, 1450-–1650, by Gabriella Zarri, trans. Keith Botsford,  83–112.

6.         Spiritual Letters, by Adriana Prosperi, trans. Keith Botsford, 113–28.

7.         The Convent Muses: Secular Writing of Italian Nuns, 1450–1650, by Elissa Weaver, 129–43.

8.         Little Women, Great Heroines: Simulated and Genuine Female Holiness in Early Modern Italy, by Anne Jacobson Schutte, 144–58.

9.         Models of Female Sanctity in Renaissance and Counter-Reformation Italy, by Sara F. Matthews Gricco, 159–75.

10.       From the Late Baroque Mystical Explosion to the Social Apostolate, 1650–1850, by Marina Caffiero, trans. Keith Botsford, 176–204.

11.       Mystical Writing, by Marilena Modica Vasta, trans. Keith Botsford, 205–18.

12.       Female Dynastic Sanctity, 1650–1850, by Sara Cabibbo, trans. Keith Botsford, 219–30.

13.       Sacred Imagery and the Religious Lives of Women, 1650–1850, by Karen-edis Barzman, 231–48.

 

 

Women and the Feminine in Medieval and Early Modern Scottish Writing. Ed. Sarah M. Dunnigan, C. Marie Harker, and Evelyn S. Newlyn. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004.

Introduction, by Sarah M. Dunnigan, xiv

I.          Written Woman

1.         The Dangers of Manly Women: Late Medieval Perceptions of Female Heroism in the Second War of Scottish Independence, by Elizabeth Ewan, 3–18.

2.         War and Truce: Aspects of Women in The Wallace, by Inge B. Milfull, 19–30.

3.         Chrystis Kirk and Peblis: Textual Containment of the Burghal Woman, by C. Marie Harker, 31–46.

4.         Women Fictional and Real in Sir David Lyndsay's Poetry, by Janet Hadley Williams, 47–60.

5.         Chastity in the Stocks: Sex in Lyndsay’s Satyre of the Thrie Estaitis, by Garrett P. J. Epp, 61–73.

6.         The ‘Feinit’ and the Feminine: Henryson’s Orpheus and Eurydice and the Gendering of Poetry, by Keven J. McGinley, 74–86.

II.        “Writing Women”

7.         A Methodology for Reading Against the Culture: Anonymous, Women Poets, and the Maitland Quarto Manuscript, by Evelyn S. Newlyn, 89–103.

8.         An Unequal Correspondence: Epistolary and Poetic Exchanges between Mary Queen of Scots and Elizabeth I, by Morna R. Fleming, 104–19.

9.         Daughterly Desires: Representing and Reimagining the Feminine in Anna Hume’s Triumphs, by Sarah M. Dunnigan, 120–35.

10.       “Neither Out Nor In”: Scottish Gaelic Women Poets, 1650–1750, by Colm Ó. Baoill, 136–52.

11.       Holy Terror and Love Divine: The Passionate Voice in Elizabeth Melville's Ane Godlie Dreame, by Deanna Delmar Evans

12.       Lilias Skene: A Quaker Poet and Her “Cursed Self,” by Gordon DesBrisay, 162–77.

13.       Scottish Women's Religious Narrative, 1660–1720: Constructing the Evangelical Self, by David George Mullan, 178–92.

III.       “Archival Women”

14.       Elizabeth Melville, Lady Culcross: 3500 New Lines of Verse, by Jamie Reid-Baxter, 195–200.

15.       Early Modern Women’s Writing in the Edinburgh Archives, c. 1550–1740: A Preliminary Checklist, by Suzanne Trill, 201–26.

 

Women and Literature in Britain, 1500–1700. Ed. Helen Wilcox. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996.

Introduction, by Helen Wilcox, 1–8.

I:          Constructing Women in Early Modern Britain

1.         Humanist Education and the Renaissance Concept of Woman, by Hilda L. Smith, 9–29.

2.         Religion and the Construction of Femininity, by Suzanne Trill, 30–55.

3.         Advice for Women from Mothers and Patriarchs, by Valerie Wayne, 56–80.

4.         Women Reading, Reading Women, by Jacqueline Pearson, 80–99.

5.         Women/‘Women’ and the Stage, by Ann Thompson, 100–116.

6.         Feminine Models of Knowing and Scientific Enquiry: Margaret Cavendish’s Poetry as Case Study, by Bronwen Price, 117–39.

II.        Writing Women in Early Modern Britain

7.         Renaissance Concepts of the ‘Wom